Skip to content

Why become a doctor? Research plus caregiving equals “an incredibly exciting career”

Stanford physician James Ford, MD, might just be a jazz bass player now, had he not fallen hard for biomedical science as an undergraduate.

As Ford explains in this Stanford Health Care video, he became hooked on the biology of cancer and, as he progressed through his training, he discovered he liked working with patients as well. Here's Ford:

I was always interested in taking care of cancer patients both because the disease is fascinating and challenging, but also because of the really deep internal medicine involvement with families and individuals that’s part of that specialty.

Now, as a medical oncologist and geneticist who directs the Stanford Cancer Genetics Program, Ford said he's glad his interests led him to “an incredibly exciting career.”

Previously: Why become a doctor? “Fixing the brain is not impossible”, Why become a doctor? A personal story from a Stanford oncologist, Why become a doctor? A personal story from a Stanford plastic surgeon

Popular posts

Sex biology redefined: Genes don’t indicate binary sexes

The scenario many of us learned in school is that two X chromosomes make someone female, and an X and a Y chromosome make someone male. These are simplistic ways of thinking about what is scientifically very complex.