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At Match Day, 70 doctors-to-be embark upon “a tremendously exciting period”

Friday was a big day in the life of 70 soon-to-be graduating Stanford medical students, who found out where they'll be heading for residency. My colleague Tracie White joined the nervous doctors-to-be and their families on the morning of Match Day and had this to report:

“You kind of put all your eggs in one basket, and today you’re going to see if they hatch,” said Kelsey Hirotsu, who dressed up in heels and curls to find out where she would be matching in dermatology. Her parents’ flight from Ohio was delayed due to bad weather, and her mom was “freaking out,” Hirotsu said, laughing as she repeated her mom’s frenzied cry, “We’re not going to be there for the envelopes!”

Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine, opened the ceremonies, applauding the accomplishments of the students, and congratulating them: “You’re embarking upon a tremendously exciting period in your career and your life of medicine,” he said. “Congratulations to all of you.”

...

Then with just one minute left before the big moment, [Charles Prober, MD, senior associate dean for medical education] gave the crowd a few clues as to what was waiting inside the soon-to-be opened envelopes. The 70 students would be matching into 20 different disciplines. About 47 percent were matching into general disciplines, such as family medicine and pediatrics, while the remaining 53 percent were matching into sub-specialties, such as neurology, plastic surgery and ophthalmology.

As White goes on to report, the students began ripping open their envelopes right at 9, "and the screams erupted, followed by hugs, tears and dozens of photos."

Previously: Match Day 2017: What will the envelope reveal?, The envelope please: Stanford medical students open next chapter of their lives at Match DayMatch Day at Stanford sizzles with successful matches & good cheer and Stanford Medicine's Match Day, in pictures
Photo by John Green

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