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Medicine X | ED explores the future of medical education in April 22-23 event

image.img.620.highTwo years ago, the Medicine X | ED conference made its debut as an academic event focusing on the future of medical education.

Until now, this event has shared the spotlight with its ‘elder sibling’ Medicine X — a wildly popular, patient-centered conference. Now, Medicine X | ED is all grown up and for the first time it's a stand-alone event taking place April 22-23 at Stanford’s School of Medicine.

The founder and director of Medicine X, Stanford anesthesiologist Larry Chu, MD, discussed the vision behind Medicine X | ED in a recent article by my colleague Tracie White:

Medicine X aims to transform health care by elevating under-heard voices from its front-line stakeholders, including patients, caregivers, providers — people with expertise to transform academic medicine from the bottom up.

We realized that in order to make real impactful change in health care, we needed to dedicate resources to reach the future leaders of tomorrow early enough to make a difference. Medicine X | ED is our answer to that unmet need.

This year's event includes keynote presentations from Neha Sangwan, MD, a developer of a program she calls “self-care in health care," and Erik Brodt, MD, who works to improve Native American health and medical training. The two-day program also includes workshops, learning labs and a breakout panel session on diversity and inclusion within medical education.

Registration is available online.

Previously: At Stanford Medicine X | ED, breakthroughs and a prescription for change and Medicine X aims to "fill the gaps" in medical education
Photo courtesy of Stanford Medicine X

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