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Stanford Medicine’s free community event scheduled for May 20


On Saturday, May 20, Stanford Medicine will open its doors for Health Matters, an annual free community day. This popular event draws guests from across the Bay Area to the Stanford campus for the opportunity to interact with faculty leaders and Stanford Health Care professionals and to learn about the latest advances in medicine.

Among the highlights of this year's event:

  • A session on longevity from Abby C. King, PhD, with the Stanford Prevention Research Center
  • A talk on the latest research and treatments from ophthalmologists Jeffrey Goldberg, MD, PhD, and Alfredo Dubra, MSc, PhD
  • A presentation on "reclaiming sleep to live your best life" from sleep expert Rafael Pelayo, MD
  • A discussion on "how heart doctors stay heart healthy" from Joshua Knowles, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine
  • A thought-provoking talk, “The opioid epidemic: Causes and solutions for the prescription drug crisis," from addiction expert and bestselling author Anna Lembke, MD

The event will also feature “Med School Morning," a program designed for teenagers interested in a career in medicine, and an interactive Health Pavilion with exhibits and booths showcasing cutting-edge medical technologies, cooking demonstrations by nutrition and wellness experts, health screenings, Stanford’s Life Flight helicopter and crew, and healthy food trucks.

The event runs from 9 AM - 2 PM, and registration is highly recommended; you can sign up and learn about the full program on the event website. And for non-local readers: Videos of the talks will be posted shortly after the event.

Previously: Videos and podcasts from Health Matters 2016 now available and Stanford Medicine's community day, Health Matters, in pictures
Photo by CM Howard Photography

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