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Stanford’s Big Data Conference returning

Bhatt at Big DataLate May brings Stanford Medicine’s fifth annual Big Data in Biomedicine conference, open to the public.

The May 24-25 meeting — titled “Big Data in Biomedicine: Transforming Lives through Precision Health” — will focus on putting big data to work in the service of precision health.

Talks will highlight the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative and the federal government's Precision Medicine Initiative, as well as panels on the role of artificial intelligence, networks and regulatory science in data science.

“We’re living in a time of unprecedented complexity — and historic opportunity,” said Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine, who will give introductory remarks at the conference. “Big data, artificial intelligence and other technological breakthroughs enable us to fulfill our promise to predict, prevent and cure — precisely — on a global scale.”

Last year, the conference attracted more than 500 attendees, while another 2,000 watched online.

Among the many speakers at the event are Marc Tessier-Lavigne, PhD, president of Stanford; Stephen Quake, PhD, professor of bioengineering at Stanford; Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association; Greg Moore, MD, PhD, vice president of Healthcare Google; Cori Bargmann, PhD, president of science for the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative; and Nikesh Kotecha, PhD, vice president of informatics for the Parker Institute.

To see the full list of speakers and register for the conference, visit the conference website.

Photo from last year's event by Saul Bromberger

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