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Big Data in Biomedicine Conference kicks off on Wednesday

Stanford Medicine's two-day Big Data in Biomedicine Conference begins this morning. The conference, now in its fifth year, focuses on the intersection of data science, technology and medicine centered on "transforming lives through precision health." It features a slate of speakers from academia, health care, industry and government. The agenda is available online.

Introductory remarks will be delivered by Dean Lloyd Minor, MD, and Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne, PhD, with the morning keynote being delivered by Eric Topol, MD, founder and director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute. Other first-day sessions include panels on artificial intelligence, cardiovascular big data and the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. The day will conclude with a reception, poster session and corporate technical showcase and a dinner.

Thursday's sessions include talks on cancer, clinical trials, digital health and network sciences, among other topics. Patricia Brennan, RN, PhD, and Valerie Florance, PhD from the National Library of Medicine and Nancy Brown from the American Heart Association, will deliver keynote addresses.

The event will be live streamed on the conference website. In addition, a selection of conference talks will be live tweeted from @StanfordMed and @StanfordCancer (follow along using the hashtag #bigdatamed), and we'll have reports from the event right here on Scope.

Previously: Countdown to Big Data in Biomedicine: On personal data and sustainabilityCountdown to Big Data in Biomedicine: Heart wellness in an era of precision health and Countdown to Big Data in Biomedicine: Improving health using network science
Photo by Saul Bromberger

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