Published by
Stanford Medicine


Nutrition, Pediatrics, Stanford News, Videos

Where is the love? A discussion of nutrition, health and repairing our relationship with food

Where is the love? A discussion of nutrition, health and repairing our relationship with food

Maya Adam, MD, a lecturer on child health and nutrition in Stanford’s Program in Human Biology, associates food with love. “Through food, we learn about where we come from, who we are, and in many ways who we want to be,” she said in a recent TEDxStanford talk. But, as in human relationships involving love, our encounters with food may involve fighting – and even tragedy and betrayal, she noted. She pointed to an antacid commercial’s presentation of a “food fight” between foods we consume to taste but that cause us indigestion and larger health problems over time.

Early in her medical training, Adam said, she learned that “pain is a protective sensation; it helps us to avoid things that could cause damage to our bodies.” Ignoring pain or masking it with antacids, as the ad suggests, sends the message that “we should medicate that sensation away and continue consuming the foods that are hurting us.” What’s more, she said, a cultural “war on food” is depleting our time, energy and joy around eating, all in the midst of an obesity epidemic.

In her talk, Adam, who teaches a massive open online course called “Child Nutrition and Cooking,” recommends examining our modern-day relationship with food, which has grown distant. Regaining a healthy relationship involves learning where food comes from and what’s inside it, and taking care to prepare and cook real food for yourself and loved ones, she said: “May the foods you eat be worthy of you, and may they be made with love.”

Previously: A spotlight on TEDxStanford’s “awe-inspiring” and “deeply moving” talks and Free Stanford online course on child nutrition & cooking

In the News, Science, Stanford News

Internships expose local high-schoolers to STEM careers and academic life

Internships expose local high-schoolers to STEM careers and academic life

beakersIt’s summertime: Do you know where your teenagers are? A piece in the Palo Alto Weekly discusses some of the choice science internships available to local high-school students at Stanford and other universities in the region. Shadowing scientists in the lab and even contributing to research, the young interns learn real-world applications for subjects they learn in school. They also gain work experience and exposure to academic careers in STEM fields. And a high-profile internship couldn’t hurt to include on college applications.

From the piece:

Coordinators often have to sift through hundreds of applications from students applying from all over the country and internationally. One of the most sought after is the Stanford Institutes of Medicine Summer Research Program, which alone received about 1,400 applications this year to fill about 70 to 75 openings. Decisions are based on academic grounds to help narrow down the number of prospective candidates — a tough task in a pool of extremely well-educated candidates.

But coordinators also recognize the need to provide opportunities for students who don’t have the chance to join accelerated science programs and express that oftentimes the most important quality of an applicant is a passion for science.

The article notes that internships gained through family and friend connections can be unevenly distributed, and  how programs like Stanford’s Raising Interest in Science and Engineering (RISE) Summer Internship Program have made the experiences more accessible. More from the piece:

“Typically those are kids with very educated parents who speak fluent English and who are comfortable poking around Stanford a little bit … or have a network and know somebody who works in a lab here. The RISE students typically just don’t have family members that can help them in that way,” [Kate Storm] says. “I think it’s important to serve all students, not just the privileged gifted students who are going to thrive and do well no matter what because they’ve got the backing of their school and parents and siblings.”

These types of opportunities are important to start curbing the racial disparities that exist in STEM occupations. Roughly 70 percent of the people in STEM occupations were Caucasian, 14 percent Asian, 6.5 percent Hispanic and 6.4 percent African American, according to an American Community Survey Report from the U.S. Census Bureau in 2011. Since 2008, Storm says about 80 percent of RISE graduates have gone on to major in math, engineering or science in college.

Researchers are also passionate about increasing the number of girls in labs since women are also largely underrepresented in STEM fields. The same 2011 U.S. Census Bureau report stated that roughly 25.8 percent of those in STEM occupations are women, compared to 45.7 percent of all jobs.

Previously: Residential learning program offers undergrads a new approach to scientific inquiry, The “transformative experience” of working in a Stanford stem-cell lab, Image of the Week: CIRM intern Brian Woo’s summer projectImage of the Week: CIRM intern Christina Bui’s summer project and Stanford’s RISE program gives high-schoolers a scientific boost
Photo by Amy

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of July 6

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

It’s time for innovation in how we pay for medical schoolJoanne Conroy, MD, chief executive officer of Lahey Clinic & Medical Center in Burlington, Mass., discusses options to decrease undergraduate medical school debt. This post originally appeared on Wing of Zock.

Without exercise, Americans are growing more obese, according to Stanford researchers: Inactivity rather than overeating could be driving the surge in Americans’ obesity, according to a study by Stanford researchers that includes first author Uri Ladabaum, MD.

The behavioral consequences of overindulgence: Researchers from the Stanford Graduate School of Business have conducted a series of experiments on how overindulgence affects our pleasure in food. Their findings offer insights for both individuals that have trouble eating and drinking in moderation and those who are picky eaters.

Fewer than six degrees of separation: the small world of higher education: In this entry of the SMS Unplugged series, med student Hamsika Chandrasekar discusses the need to address diversity of undergraduate institutions in medical school.

Stanford patient on having her genome sequenced: “This is the right thing to do for our family”: Patient Julie Prillinger’s genome was among the first to be sequenced through a pilot program of the new Clinical Genomics Service at Stanford Hospital & Clinics. The pilot phase of the service is limited to specific patient groups.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Ethics, Genetics, Medicine and Society, Parenting, Pediatrics, Stanford News

Genome testing for children: What parents should consider

Genome testing for children: What parents should consider

Genome testing: Would you do it?

Okay, next question: Would you have your child’s whole genome tested?

In the recent issue of Stanford Medicine News, Louanne Hudgins, MD, chief of medical genetics and director of perinatal genetics at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, weighs in on the issue: “I strongly advise parents against whole-genome testing for their children unless performed in the context of a medical evaluation following formal counseling regarding its utility, limitations and possible unrelated findings,” she said.

In the piece, Hudgins comments on privacy and ethics considerations, and explains why what we partially know (for instance, if your child is found to have a gene predisposing him or her to a disease) can sometimes provide more cause for worry or false hope than helpful or conclusive information.

The whole piece (a short one) is worth a read.

Previously: Stanford patient on having her genome sequenced: “This is the right thing to do for our family”, Personal molecular profiling detects diseases earlier, Stanford geneticist discusses genomics and medicine in TEDMED talk and Medical practice, patents, and “custom children”: A look at the future of reproductive medicine

Medicine and Society, Science, Stanford News, Technology

Residential learning program offers undergrads a new approach to scientific inquiry

Residential learning program offers undergrads a new approach to scientific inquiry

SIMILE studentsTwenty-two Stanford freshmen spent the last school year living, studying and socializing immersed in scientific inquiry. In its inaugural year, the residential education program SIMILE: Science in the Making Integrated Learning Environment drew interest from and selected a diverse group representative of the student body, many of whom don’t intend to become physicians or scientists or even plan to major in related fields. SIMILE students take pre-major requisites including writing, rhetoric and breadth requirements focused on the historical, cultural and social contexts of science. They also complete hands-on projects, attend field trips and regularly interact with faculty and guest lecturers in the program. Housed in the all-freshman Burbank House with ITALIC (Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture), SIMILE students attend lectures and discussion sections in-house and have some shared activities with the new arts-focused residential academic program there.

A recent Stanford Report piece notes:

In the fall, Paula Findlen, [PhD,] a professor of Italian history and director of SIMILE, and Reviel Netz, a professor of classics, team-taught Inventing Science, Technology and Medicine. The class explored how those scientific fields emerged from the human desire to understand nature – empirically, mathematically and philosophically – and to control the environment.

Findlen said the program offered a “big picture view” of how human interactions have changed over the centuries, using history as the lens to understand the invention of science, technology and medicine.

“Fundamentally, SIMILE is a program about the history of knowledge,” she said.

Previously: Exploring global health through historical literatureThoughts on the arts and humanities in shaping a medical career and Intersection of arts and medicine a benefit to both, report finds
Photo by Jeremy Moffett

Health and Fitness, Nutrition, Obesity, Parenting, Pediatrics, Stanford News

Childhood obesity expert to parents: Reduce your child's screen time

Childhood obesity expert to parents: Reduce your child's screen time

screen-tvTake a few minutes to read a brief and informative piece about the negative health effects of too much screen time for children and how you can set boundaries for your kids – or perhaps yourself. In a Stanford Medicine News Q&A, pediatrician Thomas Robinson, MD, MPH, director of the Center for Healthy Weight at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, explains how watching TV or playing video games contributes to inactivity, overeating and obesity. Robinson also speaks to the modern-day concern of restricting access to screen devices that can also be educational tools, such as the iPad.

From the Q&A:

What’s the relationship between excessive screen time and childhood obesity?

It’s a true cause-and-effect relationship. The more time kids spend with screens, the less time they are spending being active. The best evidence supports two primary mechanisms—that kids eat more while watching screens and that exposure to food advertising leads to an increased eating of high-sugar, high-fat and calorie-dense foods. Lots of research shows that kids—and adults—eat more when distracted by a screen. So one of the most important things a family can do is eliminate eating while watching TV and other screens.

Previously:  Talking to kids about junk food ads, This is your 4-year-old on cartoons, Study: Too much TV, computer could hurt kids’ mental health, Does TV watching, or prolonged sitting, contribute to child obesity rates? and Paper explores effects of electronic media on kids’ health

Global Health, Medicine and Literature, Stanford News

Exploring global health through historical literature

Exploring global health through historical literature

deskPhysician-authors, including Abraham Verghese, MD, and efforts such as Stanford’s Arts, Humanities and Medicine Program draw the general public’s attention to issues important to the medical field. They may also elicit reader empathy by discussing real-world problems, even in fictional contexts, while situating literature and the arts in an influential position.

This relationship between medicine and literature is longstanding and complex. A Stanford News article discusses some examples of public health and humanism in historical literature and profiles the work of Alvan Ikoku, MD, PhD, an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in the Humanities at Stanford.

From the piece:

As a scholar of 19th- and 20-century movements in international literature and health, [Ikoku] studies the place of long narrative forms, especially novels, in the development of tropical medicine and global health.

In his current book project, Forms of Global Health, Ikoku reads not Dickens or Gaskell, but writers such as Joseph Conrad and Andre Gide, who added to a “library of metaphors about the tropics and colonial spaces,” one that was referenced by “the fathers of tropical medicine” – returnees from colonial medical services, particularly malariologists, who wrote and lectured publicly about the need to establish a new medical specialty for the colonies.

Ikoku points out that literature provided an opportunity for readers to not simply feel an emotion, but to also actively help define a medical field and its knowledge base.

The article notes that Ikoku taught a course for Stanford students from many disciplines this spring called “The Literature of Global Health,” examining “how literary and medical writers have used narrative to explore the ethics of care in the developing world.”

Previously: Thoughts on the arts and humanities in shaping a medical careerMedical students and author Khaled Hosseini share their muse with Stanford community and Intersection of arts and medicine a benefit to both, report finds
Photo by Ben Sutherland

Public Health

Another reason to skirt traffic: health risks associated with noise pollution

trafficMapping out a 4th of July weekend adventure, I’m scheduling my drive down the I-5 by counting backward from arrival in time for a 10:30 a.m. yoga class. And, like many Californians, while planning my life around yoga I’m also thinking about alternate driving routes and factoring in time for road congestion. With tomorrow’s commute front-of-mind, I was interested to read about a recent report on the unhealthy effects of noise pollution from traffic – something I hadn’t considered. (But yoga seems like a good return to center following a sympathetic nervous system-stimulating drive.)

Scientists at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden have recommended strategies to improve urban environments in ways that reduce traffic noise and stress-related health effects such as stroke and heart disease that may be linked with it, according to a release.

More from the release:

Last fall, [Tor Kihlman, PhD,] and [Wolfgang Kropp, PhD,] initiated a meeting between international experts from the automotive industry, universities and government agencies in Innsbruck to discuss technical possibilities to achieve better urban environments.

“Many of the needed measures are ideal for implementation in dense cities. They are often in line with what is required to tackle climate change. Here are double benefits to point to,” says Tor Kihlman, mentioning three examples: the procurement of quiet public transport, reduced speed, and the usage of buildings as as effective noise barriers, through good urban planning.

The new report describes the first steps needed, politically, for society to move towards substantially reduced health effects caused by traffic noise.

Previously: Study shows link between traffic noise, heart attackCan commuting by car or public transit negatively impact your health? and The hazards of sitting in traffic
Photo by Samantha Bilodeau

Aging, Mental Health, Research, Stanford News

Everyday conversations may help older adults bounce back from hardship

JapaneseLadyAs a fan of obituaries, oral histories and encounters with people who have had long lives, I was delighted to come across a humanities study finding that conversation is good for the subjects of the stories, too. Yoshiko Matsumoto, PhD, a Stanford professor of Japanese language and linguistics, has been studying conversations of older people, who, with long lives, have faced challenges such as health problems and losses of loved ones. Her research documents which types of conversation play a particularly important role in supporting the subjects’ well-being and can provide family members and care providers “potential tools for building resiliency following change.”

More from a recent Stanford Report article:

Matsumoto’s most recent work specifically focuses on older women’s discourse about the illness or death of their husbands, with particular attention to conversations that also include humor and laughter. “These instances are not uncommon in my data, although they are a surprising combination,” Matsumoto says.

Matsumoto’s linguistic analyses of more than 60 hours of recorded conversations illustrate that there is in fact a structure to such discourse. Her findings suggest that by reframing a serious story through an ordinary, or “quotidian,” perspective, the women she studied infused their dialogue with cathartic smiles.

In one instance, a woman jokingly described how she used to chide her husband about his smoking and drinking habits – the very cause of his death. Matsumoto notes that by shifting the narrative perspective from somber to the ordinary, the speaker helped everyone involved regain the feeling of normality.

Previously: Depression, lifestyle choices shown to adversely affect memory across age groups, Helping older adults live independently using mobile-health technology and How social media and online communities can improve clinical care for elderly patients
Photo by Debs

Behavioral Science, Mental Health, Stanford News

Using mindfulness-based programs to reduce stress and promote health

Using mindfulness-based programs to reduce stress and promote health

JamesLeeIn a Stanford BeWell Q&A, Mark Abramson, DDS, the founder and facilitator of Mindfulness-Meditation Based Stress Reduction programs at Stanford Hospital & Clinics and the Stanford School of Medicine, discusses the origins of such practices and how they can be applied in health settings and other areas such as business and education. Abramson leads an eight-week mindfulness meditation course through Stanford’s Health Improvement Program.

From the Q&A:

What is Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction?

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction was originated by Jon Kabat-Zinn, [PhD,] who applied the traditional meditation practice of mindfulness (defined here as non-judgmental awareness) to medical centers. He created an eight-week treatment program for medical illnesses as well as general stress issues. In his program, he used a combination of mindfulness meditation, body awareness, and yoga to assist people with pain and a range of conditions and life issues. MBSR is now a common part of the treatment regimen in many hospital settings.

Meditation looks easy, but can be quite difficult. What is the simplest way to get started?

There are two phenomena that make meditation difficult. The first is the expectation people have that they’re going to go into a mystical, magical place where the mind shuts off and they will be in a special state. This expectation has ruined people’s practice more than anything else. Mindfulness is really just observing yourself through your natural senses — such as your taste, hearing, smelling and feeling. Even the thoughts you have are observable experiences.

The second difficulty is the habitual tendency for our minds to go off on tangents. It is difficult to stay focused; we slip away and we come back. I try to see that as part of the practice.

Previously: Med students awarded Schweitzer Fellowships lead health-care programs for underserved youthA campus-wide call to pause and reflect, Learning tools for mindful eating and Stress, will-power top reasons why Americans fail to adopt healthy habits
Photo of James Lee by Emily Hite

Stanford Medicine Resources: