Published by
Stanford Medicine

Author

Chronic Disease, Nutrition, Obesity, Videos

The role of nutrition in diabetes prevention and management

The role of nutrition in diabetes prevention and management

Can certain diets help patients prevent or manage their diabetes? Which foods are best for diabetics and which ones should they avoid? If you increase your coffee consumption, will it reduce your risk of diabetes? Kathleen Kenny, MD, a clinical associate professor at Stanford, and Jessica Shipley, a clinical dietitian at Stanford Hospital & Clinics, answered these questions and others about diabetes and nutrition in a recent Stanford Health Library talk.

In the above video, Kenny and Shipley also discuss the glycemic index and how it should be used to tailor dietary choices; examine how Mediterranean, low-carb and low-calorie diets affect diabetes; and explain how eating healthy can prevent or reverse the disease. The lecture is a must-watch for anyone wanting to make healthier food choices to benefit their health.

This video is the final lecture in a three-part series addressing important questions related to diabetes and lifestyle choices.

Previously: Diabetes and nutrition: Healthy holiday eating tips, red meat and disease risk, and going vegetarian, Diabetes and nutrition: Why healthy eating is a key component of prevention and management, Diabetes self-management program helps at-risk teens and their families make healthier choices and New evidence for a direct sugar-to-diabetes link, Examining how diet soft drinks impact your health

Health and Fitness, Orthopedics, Videos

Director of Stanford Runner’s Injury Clinic discusses advances in treating six common running injuries

Director of Stanford Runner's Injury Clinic discusses advances in treating six common running injuries

Running, as many athletes and fitness fanatics are well aware of, can often lead to foot, knee and hip injuries as a result of repetitive overload. But many of the aches and pains that nag runners can be easily avoided and remedied.

In the above Stanford Health Care video, Michael Fredericson, MD, director of the Stanford Runner’s Injury Clinic and head team physician with the Stanford Sports Medicine Program since 1992, provides an overview of prevention and treatment strategies for six of the most common running injuries. He also describes advancements in non-surgical treatment options for patients who don’t respond to standard therapies.

Previously: Director of Stanford Runner’s Injury Clinic discusses treating and preventing common injuries, Watching your phone or tablet while working out may diminish form, Stanford physician discusses prevalence of overuse injuries among college athletes and A closer look at how stretching may benefit the body

Cancer, Genetics, Stanford News, Videos, Women's Health

Stanford specialists discuss latest advancements in breast cancer screening and treatment

Stanford specialists discuss latest advancements in breast cancer screening and treatment

Invasive breast cancer will affect one in eight women in the United States during their lifetime. Many women, and men, may believe that if they don’t have a family history of breast cancer, then they’re not at risk of developing the disease. However, this is a common myth: About 90 percent of patients diagnosed with the disease have no family history of breast cancer.

But the good news is that breast cancer detected in the early stages can be very effectively treated. Additionally, breast-cancer death rates have been falling over the past 25 years as a result of increased awareness, improvements in treatments and earlier detection.

During a recent Stanford Health Library talk, captured in the above video, breast-cancer specialists discussed the latest advancements in genetic testing, diagnostic imaging, reconstructive surgery and treatments and adjunct therapies to surgery.

Previously: Don’t hide from breast cancer – facing it early is key, Despite genetic advances, detection still key in breast cancer and Ask Stanford Med: Radiologist responds to your questions about breast cancer screening

Cancer, Stanford News, Videos

Evidence-based tips and tools for helping cancer survivors manage fatigue

Evidence-based tips and tools for helping cancer survivors manage fatigue

There are an estimated 14.5 million cancer survivors in the United States, and this figure is expected to grow to almost 19 million in the next decade, according to the latest data (.pdf) from American Cancer Society.

At a recent Stanford Health Library talk, Kelly Bugos, a nurse practitioner and manager of the Stanford Cancer Survivorship Program, discussed managing fatigue, one of the most common side effects of cancer treatment. The above video offers an overview of the many cause of cancer-related fatigue, a discussion of how nutrition and exercise can help boost patients’ energy levels, and evidence-based tips and tools to help survivors feel more energetic and focused.

Previously: Practicing Qigong may help older prostate cancer survivors fight fatigue, pilot study finds, Dramatic increase in number of older cancer survivors expected and Stanford-developed fitness program helps improve cancer survivors’ quality of life

Chronic Disease, Health and Fitness, Videos

The importance of regular exercise in delaying and treating diabetes

The importance of regular exercise in delaying and treating diabetes

Looking for motivation to exercise regularly? Consider this statistic: People who engage in physical activity for seven hours a week have a 40 percent lower risk of dying early than those who are active for 30 minutes or less a week. Among the many health benefits bestowed is helping prevent and manage diabetes.

In this Stanford Health Care video, Baldeep Singh, MD, a clinical professor at Stanford who focuses on chronic disease management, explains how exercise can lower blood sugar during your workout and afterwards and help insulin work better. He says in the talk:

[Exercise] is one of the most important things that you can do as you get older because it really has all plus and no minuses … One of the keys is consistency. You want to be consistent in your regiment – even the same time of day … It’s much better to make small incremental changes and be consistent with them, than to make a huge change and than do nothing the rest of the year.

This video is the second lecture in a three-part series addressing important questions related to diabetes and lifestyle choices.

Previously: Examining the role of exercise in managing and preventing diabetesWithout exercise, Americans are growing more obese, according to Stanford researchers, Preventing pre-diabetes from turning into diabetes and Fighting a fatalistic attitude toward diabetes 

Behavioral Science, Health and Fitness, Nutrition, Obesity, Public Health, Research

Perceptions about progress and setbacks may compromise success of New Year’s resolutions

3336185391_60148a87fa_zMy physical therapist is constantly telling me to pause during the workday and take stretch breaks to counter act the damage of being hunched over a computer for hours on end. After every visit to his office, I vow to follow his advice, but then life gets busy and before I know it I’ve forgotten to keep my promise.

So I decided that one of my New Year’s resolutions will be to set an alarm on my phone to serve as a reminder to perform simple stretches throughout the day. Keeping in mind that a mere eight percent of people who make resolutions are successful, I began looking for strategies help me accomplish my goal. My search turned up new research about how the perception of setbacks and progress influence achievement of behavior change. According to a University of Colorado, Boulder release:

New Year’s resolution-makers should beware of skewed perceptions. People tend to believe good behaviors are more beneficial in reaching goals than bad behaviors are in obstructing goals, according to a University of Colorado Boulder-led study.

A dieter, for instance, might think refraining from eating ice cream helps his weight-management goal more than eating ice cream hurts it, overestimating movement toward versus away from his target.

“Basically what our research shows is that people tend to accentuate the positive and downplay the negative when considering how they’re doing in terms of goal pursuit,” said Margaret C. Campbell, lead author of the paper — published online in the Journal of Consumer Research — and professor of marketing at CU-Boulder’s Leeds School of Business.

Given these findings, researchers suggest you develop an objective method for measuring your progress and monitor it regularly.

Previously: Resolutions for the New Year and beyond, How learning weight-maintenance skills first can help you achieve New Year’s weight-loss goals, To be healthier in the new year, resolve to be more social and Helping make New Year’s resolutions stick
Photo by Laura Taylor

Chronic Disease, Stanford News, Videos

A primer on preventing or delaying type 2 diabetes

A primer on preventing or delaying type 2 diabetes

Diabetes affects an estimated 29 million Americans, and one in four people don’t know they have the disease, according to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Stanford Health Library recently held a three-part lecture series about preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes. A the first event, Stanford primary care doctor Bryant Lin, MD, shared with the audience that diabetes is “a topic near and dear to his heart” and that he deals with the disease “in both his personal life and clinical life.” Lin’s family medical history puts him at high risk for the disease: His mother, her six siblings and his maternal grandparents were all diagnosed with diabetes. On the clinical side, he treats diabetic patients at Stanford Health Care.

In the above video, Lin provides an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk-assessment and diagnosis of diabetes.

This video is the first lecture in a three-part series addressing important questions related to diabetes and lifestyle choices.

Previously: Diabetes and nutrition: Healthy holiday eating tips, red meat and disease risk, and going vegetarian, Diabetes and nutrition: Why healthy eating is a key component of prevention and management and Examining the role of exercise in managing and preventing diabetes

Nutrition, Obesity, Stanford News, Videos

Easy-to-follow tips to avoid overeating this holiday

Easy-to-follow tips to avoid overeating this holiday

‘Tis the season for overindulging. A recent report showed that we can easily consume 2,000 calories (or more) during a holiday dinner, particularly if the celebration includes appetizers and a few glasses of wine. As Neha Shah, a registered dietitian at Stanford, explains in the above Stanford Health Care video, overeating during this time of year is tied to many factors. She says, “There is so much food available at one given social setting that it’s easy to overeat and not realize it.”

There are simple techniques, however, that can help you resist the temptation to pile your plate high and go back for seconds. Watch the full video to learn easy-to-follow tips for making healthier choices this holiday season as you eat, drink and be merry.

Previously: “Less is more:” Eating wisely, with delight, during the holidays, Eat well, be well and enjoy (a little) candy, Learning tools for mindful eating and Enjoying the turkey while watching your waistline
Photo in featured-entry box by George Redgrave

Mental Health, Research, Technology

Reducing your stress level could be as simple as checking email less frequently

Reducing your stress level could be as simple as checking email less frequently

4329363938_26522735d1_zAs the end of 2014 approaches, many of us are thinking about what changes we’re going to make come Jan. 1 to be healthier and happier. Those looking for ways to reduce their stress level in 2015 may want to consider adopting a New Year’s resolution to limit how often they check their email throughout the day.

A study (subscription required) recently published in Computers in Human Behavior suggests that there are psychological benefits to easing up on the number of times you click your inbox. For the experiment, researchers at the University of British Columbia instructed half the participants to read emails no more than three times a day for a week, while a second group was allowed to check their inbox as often as they wished. The groups’ instructions were then reversed the following week. New York Magazine reports:

Overall, “limiting the number of times people checked their email per day lessened tension during a particularly important activity and lowered overall day-to-day stress,” the researchers write, and was associated with various other positive measures of psychological well-being. Those who checked their email a lot also didn’t perceive themselves as any more productive than those who were on an email diet.

…This study, combined with a lot of prior research into things like the distractions imposed by task-switching, paint a pretty clear picture: Ceaselessly checking your email probably isn’t making you more productive, and it probably is making you more stressed.

Previously: What email does to your brain
Photo by Ian Lamont

Cancer, Mental Health, Research, Women's Health

Women with mental illness less likely to be screened for breast cancer

Women with mental illness less likely to be screened for breast cancer

Previous research has shown that women are up to 40 percent more likely to experience a mental-health condition than men. Now findings published in the British Journal of Psychiatry caution that women with depression, anxiety or other mood disorders are likely missing out on important breast-cancer screenings.

In the study, British researchers conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis and comparing rates of mammography screening between women with mental illness and those without. PsychCentral reports:

Researchers found that there were significantly reduced rates of mammography screening in women with mental illness, depression, and severe mental illness such as schizophrenia.

The effect was not present in women with distress alone, suggesting distress was not the explanation.

“In this study, we found that mental ill health was linked with 45,000 missed screens which potentially could account for 90 avoidable deaths per annum in the UK alone. Clearly patients with mental illness should receive care that is at least comparable with care given to the general population. Every effort should be made to educate and support women with mental illness called for screening,” [said Alex Mitchell, MD, who led the study.]

Previously: A new way of reaching women who need mammograms, Despite genetic advances, detection still key in breast cancer, Medicine X explores the relationship between mental and physical health: “I don’t usually talk about this”Examining link between bipolar disorder, early death and Examining the connection between mental and physical health

Stanford Medicine Resources: