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Cancer, Health and Fitness, Pediatrics, Public Health, Research, Women's Health

Examining the long-term health benefits for women of exercise in adolescence

Examining the long-term health benefits for women of exercise in adolescence

soccer_8.4.15Sometime around the age of five, I distinctly remember my mother telling me, “You have to play a sport. You can pick any sport you want, but you have to play a sport.” I recall this encounter vividly because I really, really didn’t want to play sports. At the time, I was the “everything-has-to-be-pink, Barbie-doll-playing, glitter-loving” type. But I picked a sport, soccer, and surprisingly stuck with it through college.

Fast forward to today, when I came across new research touting the health benefits of exercise during adolescence and was compelled to send a “Thanks, mom” text for her fitness mandate. The findings, which were recently published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, show that women who regularly exercised as teenagers had a decreased risk of dying from cancer, cardiovascular disease and other causes during middle-age and later in life.

The study was conducted by Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the Shanghai Cancer Institute and involved the analysis of data from the Shanghai Women’s Health Study, a large ongoing prospective cohort study of 74,941 Chinese women ages 40 to 70.

Researchers defined regular exercise as occurring a minimum of once a week for three consecutive months. Lead author Sarah Nechuta, PhD, said in a release, “In women, adolescent exercise participation, regardless of adult exercise, was associated with reduced risk of cancer and all-cause mortality.”

More details about the study results:

Investigators found that participation in exercise both during adolescence and recently as an adult was significantly associated with a 20 percent reduced risk of death from all causes, 17 percent for cardiovascular disease and 13 percent for cancer.

While there have been several studies of the role of weight gain and obesity on overall mortality later in life, the authors believe this is the first cohort study of the impact of exercise during adolescence on later cause-specific and all-cause mortality among women.

The authors note that an important next step is to evaluate the role of adolescent exercise in the incidence of major chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and major cancers, which will also help provide more insight into the mechanisms of disease.

Previously: Study finds teens who play two sports show notably lower obesity rates, Exercise may lower women’s risk of dementia later in life, How physical activity influences health and Stanford pediatrician discusses developing effective programs to curtail childhood obesity
Photo by Ole Olson

Big data, BigDataMed15, Precision health, Public Health, Research, Videos

How the FDA is promoting data sharing and transparency to support innovations in public health

How the FDA is promoting data sharing and transparency to support innovations in public health

Keynote talks and presentations from the 2015 Big Data in Biomedicine conference at Stanford are now available on the Stanford YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to improve the practice of medicine and enhance human health, we’re featuring a selection of the videos on Scope.

At the 2014 Big Data in Biomedicine conference, Taha Kass-Hout, MD, chief health informatics officer for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, announced that the federal agency was launching OpenFDA, a scalable search and big-data analytics platform. In May, he returned to the Big Data in Biomedicine stage to offer an update on the initiative and discuss how the FDA is continuing to foster access and transparency of big data in government.

During his talk, Kass-Hout shared some eye-popping statistics about the information available through OpenFDA. The platform houses close to 70,000 product labels for pharmaceuticals; nearly four million reports on adverse events or malfunctions of medical devices; 41,000 records on recalls of foods, pharmaceuticals or devices and over four and a half million reports of adverse events or side-effects of drugs.

He outlined future plans to build a similar public, cloud-based platform to compliment the Obama Administration’s Precision Medicine Initiative. Watch the full talk to learn more about these exciting efforts to unlock the rapidly growing reservoir of biomedical data and spur innovation in public health.

Previously: A look at the MyHeart Counts app and the potential of mobile technologies to improve human health, Discussing patient participation in medical research: “We had to take this into our own hands,” A look at aging and longevity in this “unprecedented” time in history, Mining Twitter to identify cases of foodborne illness and Discussing access and transparency of big data in government

Big data, BigDataMed15, Cardiovascular Medicine, Medical Apps, Stanford News, Videos

A look at the MyHeart Counts app and the potential of mobile technologies to improve human health

A look at the MyHeart Counts app and the potential of mobile technologies to improve human health

Keynote talks and presentations from the 2015 Big Data in Biomedicine conference at Stanford are now available on the Stanford YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to improve the practice of medicine and enhance human health, we’re featuring a selection of the videos on Scope.

At last count, the number of iPhone owners who have downloaded the MyHeart Counts app and consented to participate in a large-scale, human heart study had reached 40,000. The first-of-its-kind mobile app was designed by Stanford Medicine cardiologists as a way for users to learn about their heart health while simultaneously helping advance the field of cardiovascular medicine.

Built on Apple’s ResearchKit framework, the app leverages the iPhone’s built-in motion sensors to collect data on physical activity and other cardiac risk factors for a research study. The MyHeart Counts study also draws on the strength of Stanford Medicine’s Biomedical Data Science Initiative.

At the 2015 Big Data in Biomedicine conference, Euan Ashley, MD, a cardiologist at Stanford and co-investigator for the MyHeart Counts study, shared some preliminary findings with the audience. Check out the full talk to learn more about how the app is helping researchers better understand Americans’ health habits and what states have the happiest, most physically active and well-rested residents.

Previously: On the move: Big Data in Biomedicine goes mobile with discussion on mHealth, MyHeart Counts shows that smartphones are catching on as new research tool, Lights, camera, action: Stanford cardiologist discusses MyHeart Counts on ABC’s Nightline, MyHeart Counts app debuts with a splash and Stanford launches iPhone app to study heart health.

Global Health, Medical Education

A behind the scenes look at the Stanford-ABC News Fellowship in Media and Global Health

A behind the scenes look at the Stanford-ABC News Fellowship in Media and Global Health

Since arriving at Stanford, third-year medical student Michael Nedelman has pursued his passion for film by producing a number of documentaries, including projects about LGBT veterans experiences of trauma and recovery and health-care access in post-typhoon Philippines. This year, he is embarking on a new journey as the 2015-2016 Stanford-ABC News Global Health Media Fellow where he will explore how multiple media platforms can have a significant impact on global health work.

Nedelman is chronicling his fellowship experience on his blog. Currently, he is working for the World Health Organization (WHO) in Delhi as part of team responsible for the organization’s media output for the Southeast Asia region. His first entry focuses on the role of media at the WHO and includes a podcast with Vismita Gupta-Smith, a public information and advocacy officer at the WHO in Southeast Asia. Listen to their full conversation above.

Previously: After Haiyan: Stanford med student makes film about post-typhoon Philippines, Stanford Storytellers: Medical students write a children’s book to comfort and educate and Stanford med student discusses his documentary on LGBT vets’ health

Health and Fitness, Nutrition, Obesity, Research

Can food mentions in newspapers predict national obesity rates?

Can food mentions in newspapers predict national obesity rates?

New_York_TimesFood words trending in today’s newspapers could help predict a country’s obesity rates in three years, according to findings recently published in the journal BMC Public Health. 

In the study, researchers examined whether media mentions of food predate obesity prevalence by analyzing mentions of foods in New York Times and London Times articles over the past 50 years. Using this data, they statistically correlated it with each country’s annual Body Mass Index, or BMI. Brennan Davis, PhD, lead author of the study and an associate professor of marketing at California Polytechnic State University, said in a release that results showed:

The more sweet snacks are mentioned and the fewer fruits and vegetables that are mentioned in your newspaper, the fatter your country’s population is going to be in 3 years, according to trends we found from the past fifty years … But the less often they’re mentioned and the more vegetables are mentioned, the skinnier the public will be.

Researchers say the research could help public health officials better understand the effectiveness of current obesity interventions.

Previously: Adventurous eaters more likely to be healthy, new study shows, Want kids to eat their veggies? Researchers suggest labeling foods with snazzy names, Can edible “stop signs” revive portion control and curb overeating? and Can dish color influence how much you eat?
Photo by Jaysin Trevino

Big data, BigDataMed15, Chronic Disease, Videos

Discussing patient participation in medical research: “We had to take this into our own hands”

Discussing patient participation in medical research: "We had to take this into our own hands"

Keynote talks and presentations from the 2015 Big Data in Biomedicine conference at Stanford are now available on the Stanford YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to improve the practice of medicine and enhance human health, we’re featuring a selection of the videos on Scope.

Two days before Christmas in 1994, Sharon Terry’s two young children were diagnosed with pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), a rare condition that causes calcium and other minerals to be deposited in the body’s tissue. As Terry told the audience at the 2015 Big Data in Biomedicine conference, “[My husband and I] quickly learned that we, in fact, had to take this into our own hands, like many parents have done before us and many parents have done after us.” Despite not having a science background, Terry co-discovered the gene associated with PXE and created a diagnostic test for the disease; over the years, she has conducted clinical trials and authored 140 peer-reviewed papers, of which 30 are PXE clinical studies.

In the above video, Terry recounts the inspiring journey of how she and her husband worked for two decades with scientists worldwide to advance research on PXE in hopes of developing therapeutic treatments. She also explains her current work as president and CEO of Genetic Alliance to help individuals, families and communities participate in scientific research and promote the sharing of health data to improve health.

Previously: A look at aging and longevity in this “unprecedented” time in history, Parents turn to data after son is diagnosed with ultra-rare disease, Nobel Laureate Michael Levitt explains why “biology is information rich” at Big Data in Biomedicine, At Big Data in Biomedicine, Stanford’s Lloyd Minor focuses on precision health and  Experts at Big Data in Biomedicine: Bigger, better datasets and technology will benefit patients

Neuroscience, Stanford News, Videos

Are decisions driven by subconscious desires or shaped by conscious goals?

Are decisions driven by subconscious desires or shaped by conscious goals?

Throughout our lives, we often encounter perplexing situations involving other individuals or read in the news about someone’s seemingly irrational decision and say to ourselves: What were they thinking? In this Stanford+Connects video, Bill Newsome, PhD, director of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute, and his wife Brie Linkenhoker, PhD, a neuroscientists-turned-strategist who directs Worldview Stanford, examine the process of decision making and the role of impulses and self-control. Watch the full talk to learn more about the mechanisms driving us to make decisions.

Previously: Exploring the science of decision making and Exploring the intelligence-gathering and decision-making processes of infants

Chronic Disease, Research, Stanford News, Videos

“This is probably one of the last major diseases we know nothing about”: A look at CFS

“This is probably one of the last major diseases we know nothing about": A look at CFS

Chronic fatigue syndrome affects between 836,000 to 2.5 million people in the United States, and 25 percent of them are confined to their bed. Earlier this year, the Institute of Medicine released a report acknowledging that chronic fatigue syndrome is a real and serious disease and renaming the disorder “systemic exertion intolerance disease” to better reflect its key symptoms.

The current issue of Palo Alto Weekly focuses on the disease and tells the story of local resident Whitney Dafoe, a promising 31-year-old photographer whose career was cut short when he began experiencing crushing fatigue, dizziness, gastrointestinal problems and dramatic weight loss:

Dafoe’s disease has progressed to the point that he cannot talk, read or use the Internet. His joint pain became so severe some time ago that he could no longer walk and needed to use a wheel chair. Now he rarely gets out of bed. On a good day, he’ll show his gratitude by pointing to his heart, his mother said.

His parents have stuck a few brief messages he’s scrawled on notes to the door frame outside his room. The yellow squares of paper are the only way he can communicate these days.

“I don’t know what to say. I just feel pretty hopeless about all this. I never get a break from bad things,” he wrote on one note.

“It’s so hard not being able to take care of my stuff. The feeling of helplessness it gives me is so stressful,” another states.

Dafoe, who is also featured in the above video, is the son of Ronald Davis, PhD, a genetics researcher who was instrumental in the Human Genome Project and directs Stanford’s Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Research Center. A second article details how Davis and colleagues are working to better understand the debilitating disease and develop diagnostic tests and treatments:

Davis and his team plan to use technologies developed for the Human Genome Project to sequence the entire genome of chronic fatigue patients, including 1,600 mitochondrial genes, more than 20,000 other genes and control regions that regulate genes. They hope to identify proteins that are found in immune cells, blood and spinal fluid; search for infectious agents in blood, bone marrow, spinal fluid and saliva and changes to gastrointestinal tract flora; and find evidence of autoimmune responses. The research could reveal DNA sequences that are altered in chronic fatigue patients.

The detailed approach is more comprehensive than that of other research, which has only looked at a fraction of the genes, according to the center’s website.

Davis is working with numerous collaborators across many fields, hoping the collaborative effort will attract the best minds in their fields.

“This is probably one of the last major diseases we know nothing about. This is your last chance to be a pioneer,” he said.

Previously: ME/CFS/SEID: It goes by many aliases, but its blood-chemistry signature is a giveawayChronic fatigue syndrome gets more respect (and a new name), Studies on ME/chronic fatigue syndrome continue to grab headlines, spur conversation, Unbroken: A chronic fatigue syndrome patient’s long road to recovery and Deciphering the puzzle of chronic fatigue syndrome

Health and Fitness, Videos

A day in the life of your body, in video

A day in the life of your body, in video

Most of us give little thought to the daily inner workings of our bodies. We’re more focused on the tasks of getting ourselves, and the kids, out the door in the morning; tackling the to-do items filling up our inboxes; carving out a few minutes for exercise; and battling traffic on the commute home. But it’s worth a moment to hit pause and watch the latest ASAP Science video about the range of biological activities taking place in our bodies morning, noon and night. The short video is packed with surprising statistics, including the factoids that the majority of us are mentally sharpest 2.5-4 hours after waking and that research shows you can gain 20 percent more muscle strength by working out in the afternoon.

Previously: MeDesign Human Health Book: human anatomy diagrams with sleek new look, Stanford partnering with Google [x] and Duke to better understand the human body and Touring the microscopic worlds of the human body

Aging, BigDataMed15, Videos

A look at aging and longevity in this “unprecedented” time in history

A look at aging and longevity in this "unprecedented" time in history

Keynote talks and presentations from the 2015 Big Data in Biomedicine conference at Stanford are now available on the Stanford YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to improve the practice of medicine and enhance human health, we’re featuring a selection of the videos on Scope.

Life expectancy dramatically increased in the 20th century and has reached an all-time high in the United States. At this year’s Big Data in Biomedicine conference, Laura Carstensen, PhD, director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, called this point in history “unprecedented” in terms of longevity. She told attendees, “Our ancestors in the 20th century added more years to life expectancy than all years added across all prior millennia of human evolution combined.” She also noted that for the first time in the history of our species, “the vast majority of babies born in the developing world have the opportunity to grow old.”

In the above talk, she explains the changes that led to this “stunning achievement” and presents data to explore what aging now looks like – and what it might look like in the future.

Previously: Parents turn to data after son is diagnosed with ultra-rare disease, Nobel Laureate Michael Levitt explains why “biology is information rich” at Big Data in Biomedicine, At Big Data in Biomedicine, Stanford’s Lloyd Minor focuses on precision health, Experts at Big Data in Biomedicine: Bigger, better datasets and technology will benefit patients and On the move: Big Data in Biomedicine goes mobile with discussion on mHealth

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