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Patient Care, Pediatrics, Stanford News, Videos

Pediatric patients create vibrant mural with help from Hewlett-Packard and DreamWorks Animation

Pediatric patients create vibrant mural with help from Hewlett-Packard and DreamWorks Animation

Here’s a feel-good story that will lift your spirits. Over at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, patients are working with volunteers from Hewlett-Packard and DreamWorks Animation to construct a unique piece of artwork designed digitally or drawn by hand. As described in the above video, the DreamWorks team worked with children in the hospital’s onsite school to create imaginary creatures, and next built a background and composited the patients’ art into a large mural. Then, Hewlett-Packard printed the custom designs onto PVC-free wallpaper. The final mural now hangs in Hewlett-Packard’s Palo Alto headquarters.

Previously: Ensuring young dialysis patients make the grade

Neuroscience, Research, Stanford News

Non-invasive technique uses lasers and carbon nanotubes to provide view of blood flow in the brain

Non-invasive technique uses lasers and carbon nanotubes to provide view of blood flow in the brain

When researchers want to explore the brain of living animals, they have two options: surgically remove part of the skull, a procedure that can alter its function or trigger an immune response, or use CT or MRI scans, which isn’t effective for visualizing activity of individual vessels or groups of neurons. But a new approach developed by Stanford chemists holds the promise of offering a third option that is non-invasive and captures “an unprecedented look at blood flowing through a living brain.”

The technique involves injecting water-soluble carbon nanotubes into the subject’s bloodstream, in this case mice, and using near-infrared light to illuminate the brain vasculature and track cerebral blood flow. The work, which was published in Nature Photonics, could be useful in advancing the study of stroke and migraines, as well as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. According to a recent Stanford Report story:

Amazingly, the technique allows scientists to view about three millimeters underneath the scalp and is fine enough to visualize blood coursing through single capillaries only a few microns across, said senior author Hongjie Dai, a professor of chemistry at Stanford. Furthermore, it does not appear to have any adverse affect on innate brain functions.

….

The technique could eventually be used in human clinical trials, Hong said, but will need to be tweaked. First, the light penetration depth needs to be increased to pass deep into the human brain. Second, injecting carbon nanotubes needs approval for clinical application; the scientists are currently investigating alternative fluorescent agents.

Previously: Lightning strikes twice: Optogenetics pioneer Karl Deisseroth’s newest technique renders tissues transparent, yet structurally intact, Peering into the brains of freestyle rappers to better understand creativity and Brain imaging, and the “image management” cells that make it possible

Behavioral Science, Mental Health, Research

Pump up the bass, not the volume, to feel more powerful

Pump up the bass, not the volume, to feel more powerful

runner_iPodAs any seasoned athlete or fitness fanatic knows, a meticulously curated playlist is key when staying focused before a big game or getting through a tough workout. But what is it about music that transforms our psychological state and make us feel more powerful?

To answer this question, researchers at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University identified so-called “highest power” songs (such as Queen’s “We Will Rock You“) and “lowest power” tunes (such as Fatboy Slim’s “Because We Can“) and then performed a series of experiments designed to ascertain how the music affected individuals’ sense of power, perceived sense of control, competitiveness and abstract thinking. According to a release, their findings showed “that the high-power music not only evoked a sense of power unconsciously, but also systematically generated the three downstream consequences of power.”

Since participants didn’t report increased feelings of empowerment after reading the lyrics of the songs, researchers turned their attention to how manipulation of bass levels impacted listeners. More from the release:

In the bass experiments, the researchers asked participants to listen to novel instrumental music pieces in which bass levels were digitally varied. In one experiment, they surveyed participants about their self-reported feelings of power, and in another, they asked them to perform a word-completion task designed to test implicit, or unconscious, feelings of power. They found that those who listened to the heavy-bass music reported more feelings of power and generated more power-related words in the implicit task than those listening to the low-bass music.

The effects of the bass levels support one possible explanation for why music makes people feel more powerful: the “contagion hypothesis.” The idea is that when people hear specific music components that express a sense of power, they mimic these feelings internally. “Importantly, because we used novel, never-before-heard music pieces in these experiments, it suggests that the effect may sometimes arise purely out of contagion,” [Dennis Hsu, PhD,] says. “Of course, this does not preclude the possibility that music could induce a sense of power through other processes, such as conditioning.”

The “conditioning hypothesis” suggests that certain pieces of music might trigger powerful experiences because these experiences are often paired with that particular music. For example, music used frequently at sports events may elicit powerful feelings because of the association with power, rewards, and winning (e.g., “We Are the Champions” is often played to celebrate victory).

Previously: Why listening to music boosts fitness performance, Can music benefit cancer patients? and Prescription playlists for treating pain and depression?
Photo by Bert Heird

In the News, Pediatrics, Stanford News, Surgery, Transplants

Parents’ heroic effort help 12-year-old daughter receive a new heart and lungs

Parents' heroic effort help 12-year-old daughter receive a new heart and lungs

Fewer than 10 children received a heart-lung transplant in the United States last year. One of them was 12-year-old Katie Grace Groebner, who was diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension in 2008 and given a year to live.

Determined to save their daughter’s life, Katie Gracie’s parents sold their house in Minnesota and most of their belongings and moved to the Bay Area so she could be treated by Jeffrey Feinstein, MD, director of the Center for Pulmonary Vascular Disease at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford.

As reported in the NBC Bay Area segment above, the Groebners understandably call Katie’s doctors and nurses “heroes,” but Feinstein says it’s the other way around. “You want to find a hero? Talk about the parents,” he says in the video. “If you look at the amount of work that I did, compared to amount of work Katie Grace’s parents did? There’s no comparison.”

Previously: Living long term with transplanted organs: One patient’s story, Stanford study in transplant patients could lead to better treatment, Anatomy of a pediatric heart transplant and ‘Genome transplant’ concept helps Stanford scientists predict organ rejection

In the News, Medical Education, Medical Schools, Stanford News

Rethinking the traditional four-year medical curriculum

Rethinking the traditional four-year medical curriculum

In an effort to meet the needs of medical students, physicians and patients, a number of universities are considering ways to shorten the traditional four-year medical curriculum without compromising quality of care. The New York Times reports that “a recent, unpublished survey of 120 medical schools, conducted by the New York University School of Medicine, found that 30 percent were considering or already planning to start three-year programs” and notes that the American Medical Association is among those advocating for such innovative approaches. Denise Grady writes:

More than a dozen medical schools already have programs to move students more quickly from the classroom to the clinic, but by shortening premedical studies rather than medical school. Among them are Albany Medical College, Northeast Ohio Medical University and the medical schools at Boston University, Drexel, George Washington, Howard, Jefferson, Meharry and Northwestern. Gifted high school seniors or early college students are guaranteed admission to medical school if they perform well during freshman year of college. Combined bachelors/M.D. programs have been around for half a century, but these students complete both degrees in six or seven years instead of the usual eight.

“I absolutely think it’s doable,” said Dr. Charles G. Prober, senior associate dean for medical education at Stanford School of Medicine, which is considering such a program. Well-designed programs to accelerate doctors’ training “don’t send them out prematurely, but send them out with adequate tools, recognizing that they will grow,” said Dr. Prober, who writes and speaks extensively on medical education reform. “Real learning begins when you are actually beginning to take care of patients, doing what you were trained to do.”

While research is scant, a few studies show promising results. Comparisons of graduates of three-year programs at the University of Calgary and McMaster University to graduates of four-year Canadian medical schools found “equivalent performance.” And a small study at Marshall University in the 1990s, which for almost a decade incorporated fourth-year requirements with the first year of residency in family practice, declared it a success for “carefully selected candidates.”

Indeed, educators make clear that not all students can handle the accelerated curriculum. Dr. Prober notes that with the explosion of medical information, students more than ever must learn to work smart, figuring out what they need to memorize and how to find out the rest. Part of the education process today is learning to collaborate and tap the expertise of others.

Previously: A closer look at using the “flipped classroom” model at the School of Medicine, Combining online learning and the Socratic method to reinvent medical school courses, Rethinking the “sage on stage” model in medical education and Stanford professors propose re-imagining medical education with “lecture-less” classes

Medicine X, Stanford News, Technology, Videos

Medicine X symposium focuses on how patients, providers and entrepreneurs can ignite innovation

Medicine X symposium focuses on how patients, providers and entrepreneurs can ignite innovation

A special Medicine X event on Sept. 4 will explore how patients, providers and entrepreneurs can help ignite innovation in the health-care industry. During the daylong symposium, James Hereford, chief operating officer at Stanford Hospital & Clinics, will be presenting crucial opportunities for innovation in medicine today, and challenging physicians, patients and entrepreneurs to collaborate and build partnerships in an effort to create impact and change.

In the above Medicine X film, Hereford discusses the importance of patient-centered care, the need to treat the whole person and not just the illness and how including patients in pivotal discussions is crucial to transform health care. “I don’t think the world should be defined around us,” said Hereford. “I think the world should be defined around our patients.”

The brief conversation offers a taste of the thoughtful commentary that attendees can expect at this event. Other speakers include: Robert Pearl, MD, executive director and chief executive officer of The Permanente Medical Group; Stanford radiologist Lawrence Hoffman, MD; Mark Tomaino, senior industry executive at Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe; Vivian Lee, MD, PhD, chief executive officer of University of Utah Health Care; and Alexandra Drane, co-founder of Eliza Corp. For more information or to register for the symposium visit the conference website.

Previously: Medicine X spotlights mental health, medical team of the future and the “no-smartphone” patient, Medicine X Live! to host Hangout on design thinking for patient engagement and Quite the reach: Stanford Medicine X set record for most number of tweets at a health-care conference

Neuroscience, Parenting, Pediatrics, Research

Can’t remember being a baby? Rapid growth of new neurons in young brains may explain why

Can't remember being a baby? Rapid growth of new neurons in young brains may explain why

baby_073014A close friend once told me that one of her favorite aspects about being a parent is that she could experience what it was like to be a baby and toddler. “As adults, we have no recollection of what it was like to be that young,” she said. “Watching my son grow up offers me a window into that part of my life.”

The inability to remember memories in early childhood is known as “infantile amnesia”. Few adults can remember events in their lifetime that occurred before the age of three. A past study shows that these memories tend to fade away around the age of seven.

But why can’t we remember our days as a crawling, toddling, babbling youngster? Recent research suggests the answer many have to do with how quickly the brain develops during this stage in our lives. According to a Scientific American article published earlier this week:

In a new experiment, the scientists manipulated the rate at which hippocampal neurons grew in young and adult mice. The hippocampus is the region in the brain that records autobiographical events. The young mice with slowed neuron growth had better long-term memory. Conversely, the older mice with increased rates of neuron formation had memory loss.

Based on these results, published in May in the journal Science, [neuroscientists Paul Frankland, PhD, and Sheena Josselyn, PhD] think that rapid neuron growth during early childhood disrupts the brain circuitry that stores old memories, making them inaccessible. Young children also have an underdeveloped prefrontal cortex, another region of the brain that encodes memories, so infantile amnesia may be a combination of these two factors.

Previously: Study finds age at which early-childhood memories fade and Individuals’ extraordinary talent to never forget could offer insights into memory
Photo by D Sharon Pruitt

Addiction, In the News, Public Health, Public Safety

Can the “24/7 sobriety” model reduce drunken disorderly conduct and violence in London?

beer_london_pubIn an article published yesterday in the Telegraph, Stanford addiction expert Keith Humphreys, PhD, discusses how public officials in London are turning to the United States’ “24/7 sobriety” model in an effort to reduce repeat offenders convicted of alcohol-related crimes. The program, which combines mandatory sobriety and daily breathalyser tests, was created under Humphreys’ guidance. He writes:

Research by the RAND Corporation – a US-based non-profit global policy think tank – found that 24/7 sobriety dropped repeat drink driving arrests by 12 per cent. The same study also yielded a pleasant surprise: domestic violence arrests dropped by 9 per cent, despite not being a focus of the programme. Removing alcohol from the lives of criminals can apparently have radiating benefits beyond those directly related to their most recent offence.

In light of its positive results, judges across the U.S. have been adopting the 24/7 sobriety approach. This week, under the leadership of Mayor Johnson and his team, a pilot of the programme will be launched in South London. Leaping the pond will come with some challenges, particularly around delivering sanctions swiftly within the constraints of British law, but local tailoring of innovations is always an essential part of making them spread.

In any event, with over one million alcohol-related assaults occurring nationally each year and many London boroughs being regularly marred by violence and disorder on weekend evenings, the time for new approaches to binge drinking criminal offenders has clearly arrived. The judges and probation officers who are undertaking this pilot should be applauded for refusing to accept the status quo.

Previously: Text messages after ER visit could reduce young adults’ binge drinking by more than 50 percent, Study shows legal drinking age of 21 saves lives and reduces health risks for young adults, Alcoholism: Not just a man’s problem and Stopping criminal men from drinking reduces domestic violence
Photo by Paul Downey

Events, Medicine X, Mental Health, Stanford News, Technology

Medicine X spotlights mental health, medical team of the future and the “no-smartphone” patient

Medicine X spotlights mental health, medical team of the future and the “no-smartphone” patient

Larry_ChuInnovative thinkers and thought leaders engaged in using emerging technologies to enhance health-care delivery and advance the practice of medicine will gather here in early September for Stanford Medicine X.

As Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine, comments in a release today, Larry Chu, MD, associate professor of anesthesia at Stanford and executive director of the conference, “has made this the go-to event for e-patients, physicians and innovators who want to get together to map out the future of health care.” Chu also notes that the conference  “has distinguished itself through a singular commitment to inclusivity and by finding new ways to bring every voice and perspective into important conversations about health care.”

Now in its third year, Medicine X is building on this inclusive spirit by exploring a variety of new themes during its 2014 program. More from our release:

This year’s program will spotlight the relationship between physical and mental well-being with three breakout panels. Psychologist Ann Becker-Shutte, PhD, will moderate a session on how mental health affects overall health. A conversation about emerging technologies in mental health will be led by Malay Gandhi, managing director of Rock Health, a business accelerator for health-care technology startup companies. Additionally, patient advocate Sarah Kucharski will direct a discussion about depression caused by chronic disease and about coping through online communities.

“Mental health is imperative to address in the overall conversation about the future of health care,” said Chu. “We need to be thinking about the health of the whole person, not just a patient’s individual symptoms or disease.”

The three-day event will also feature panels on what the medical team of the future may look like; how patients with chronic diseases can use self-tracking tools to improve their health and support one another; ways for the pharmaceutical industry to partner with patients in the drug discovery and clinical trial process; and opportunities to connect with “no-smartphone” patients — those who don’t have the access or resources to fully engage with health-enhancing technologies.

Keynote speakers for this year’s conference, being held Sept. 5-7, include Daniel Siegel, MD, clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California-Los Angeles; Barron Lerner, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and population health at New York University School of Medicine; and Charles Ornstein, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and senior reporter at ProPublica.

For information about the program or to  register the Medicine X website. Last year’s conference sold out, and space is limited for this year’s event.

Previously: Medicine X Live! to host Hangout on design thinking for patient engagement, Quite the reach: Stanford Medicine X set record for most number of tweets at a health-care conference, Videos from Medicine X now available and “You belong here”: A recap of Stanford Medicine X
Photo of Larry Chu by StanfordMedicineX

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Cardiovascular Medicine, Research, Videos

Researchers capture detailed three-dimensional images of cardiac dynamics in zebrafish

Researchers capture detailed three-dimensional images of cardiac dynamics in zebrafish

The stunning video above depicts a reconstructed beating heart of a zebrafish embryo with the muscle layer shown in red and the endothelium highlighted in blue. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Germany created the video using a new three-dimensional imaging technique, which holds the promise of leading to a better “understanding of congenital heart defects as well in future experiments on cardiac function and development”. As explained in a release:

[Researchers] developed a high-speed, selective plane illumination microscope that manages to do just that. By gently illuminating the fish heart with a thin light sheet and observing the emitted fluorescence with a fast and sensitive camera the researchers have achieved fast, non-invasive imaging of labelled heart tissue. The process involves taking multiple movies, each covering individual planes of the heart (movie stacks), then using the correlations between the individual planes to generate a synchronised, dynamic 3D image of the beating heart.

“These renderings allow us to further follow characteristic structures of the heart throughout the cardiac cycle,” says Michaela Mickoleit, PhD student who performed the experiments in [Jan Huisken's] lab.

Via Medgadget
Previously: An advancement in optogenetics: Switching off cells with light now as easy as switching them on and New York Times profiles Stanford’s Karl Deisseroth and his work in optogenetics

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