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Breast cancer in men and women differ in levels of cancer-associated gene expression and the relative risk of recurrence after initially successful treatment. Some men have a higher risk than women, whereas others have a much lower risk.

Breast cancer in men and women differ in levels of cancer-associated gene expression and the relative risk of recurrence after initially successful treatment. Some men have a higher risk than women, whereas others have a much lower risk.

Stanford’s Cancer Genetics Program helps assess families' hereditary cancer risks and guide patients to make informed choices about prevention and treatment.

Stanford’s Cancer Genetics Program helps assess families' hereditary cancer risks and guide patients to make informed choices about prevention and treatment.

According to Stanford pediatric oncologist Crystal Mackall, a pediatric oncologist with Stanford Children's Health, immunotherapy with CAR T cells is more precise, more specific and just as potent a treatment for leukemia as chemotherapy.

According to Stanford pediatric oncologist Crystal Mackall, a pediatric oncologist with Stanford Children's Health, immunotherapy with CAR T cells is more precise, more specific and just as potent a treatment for leukemia as chemotherapy.

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On the Future of Everything radio show, Stanford bioengineer Jennifer Cochran discusses her development of "tumor-targeting missiles" that deliver chemotherapy as "cargo" to more effectively kill cancer.

On the Future of Everything radio show, Stanford bioengineer Jennifer Cochran discusses her development of "tumor-targeting missiles" that deliver chemotherapy as "cargo" to more effectively kill cancer.

A new radioactive agent developed at Stanford can identify whether a widely used lung cancer drug is likely to be effective.

A new radioactive agent developed at Stanford can identify whether a widely used lung cancer drug is likely to be effective.

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A new technique gives doctors an early view of which pediatric leukemia patients will relapse, and may point the way toward better cancer drugs.

A new technique gives doctors an early view of which pediatric leukemia patients will relapse, and may point the way toward better cancer drugs.

Loss of taste sensation occurs in about 85 percent of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. A new Stanford study explored the problem.

Loss of taste sensation occurs in about 85 percent of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. A new Stanford study explored the problem.

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