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This challenge asks participants to recognize when negative thoughts are occurring and try to diffuse them when they turn worrisome or distracting.

This challenge asks participants to recognize when negative thoughts are occurring and try to diffuse them when they turn worrisome or distracting.

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More than a third of patients who are prescribed statins fail to take them regularly, and they are dying at higher rates as a result.

More than a third of patients who are prescribed statins fail to take them regularly, and they are dying at higher rates as a result.

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A Stanford researcher has found that patients with heart failure, even if it's relatively mild, are more likely to die within three months after surgery.

A Stanford researcher has found that patients with heart failure, even if it's relatively mild, are more likely to die within three months after surgery.

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Type 1 diabetes starts out as a sneak attack by bad-actor antibodies. But scientists at Stanford and UCSF have developed an early-warning system.

Type 1 diabetes starts out as a sneak attack by bad-actor antibodies. But scientists at Stanford and UCSF have developed an early-warning system.

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Experts studying nicotine and e-cigarette norms say that Juul has instigated a "nicotine arms race," causing a shift across the e-cigarette industry.

Experts studying nicotine and e-cigarette norms say that Juul has instigated a "nicotine arms race," causing a shift across the e-cigarette industry.

Patients who are taking the most common type of antidepressant may feel more pain when taking certain opioids, Stanford researchers have found.

Patients who are taking the most common type of antidepressant may feel more pain when taking certain opioids, Stanford researchers have found.

Stanford scientists have dug up a defect at the heart of rheumatoid arthritis: a faulty "anchor" that should be tethering a key molecule to the spot inside immune cells where it has to be in order to do its job.  It seems this defect can be reversed with a not yet commercially available small-molecule drug.

Stanford scientists have dug up a defect at the heart of rheumatoid arthritis: a faulty "anchor" that should be tethering a key molecule to the spot inside immune cells where it has to be in order to do its job.  It seems this defect can be reversed with a not yet commercially available small-molecule drug.

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Alvin Roth, a Nobel laureate and Stanford faculty member, explains how the economic concept of repugnant markets applies to heroin in the United States.

Alvin Roth, a Nobel laureate and Stanford faculty member, explains how the economic concept of repugnant markets applies to heroin in the United States.

Stanford psychologist Ian Gotlib is examining how depression develops and working to identify potential opportunities for intervention.

Stanford psychologist Ian Gotlib is examining how depression develops and working to identify potential opportunities for intervention.

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A Stanford historian explains how frequent yellow fever epidemics in 19-century Louisiana generated cultural and social norms in its fatal wake.

A Stanford historian explains how frequent yellow fever epidemics in 19-century Louisiana generated cultural and social norms in its fatal wake.