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Ethics, Events, Medical Education, Medicine and Literature, Stanford News

During their first days at Stanford, medical students ponder the ethical challenges ahead

During their first days at Stanford, medical students ponder the ethical challenges ahead

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In an effort to help prepare this year’s crop of new medical students for the future challenges of keeping true to the spirit of the Hippocratic Oath – to first do no harm ‑ Stanford’s School of Medicine held a new discussion session during orientation.

In between learning about housing and schedules and all the necessary details of starting medical school, the 90 new students who started class on Monday joined with two deans of the school last week to discuss one of the most controversial topics in the world of medicine: euthanasia.

Included among the students’ summer reading assignment was the book Five Days at Memorial, a blow-by-blow account of the days medical staff and patients spent trapped in a New Orleans hospital after Hurricane Katrina struck. Left without electricity or sanitation, staff slept little and worked endlessly to care for the sick and dying patients not knowing if any of the patients – or anyone else trapped at the hospital — would survive. An online story explains why the book was assigned as summer reading:

Most [new students] had not yet faced the responsibilities they will encounter routinely as physicians. It was the ethical and emotional challenges ahead that [Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the medical school, and Charles Prober, MD, senior associate dean of medical education] hoped to explore during the book discussion. “I think one of the key lessons from this book: If we’re going to make progress in medicine, we’re going to have to face realistically when we make errors,” Minor said. “Progress only occurs when we are able to frankly address those situations and acknowledge those errors.”

The book describes health-care workers treating patients in a way that could arguably violate tenets of the Stanford Affirmation. “You will be reciting this later today after you receive your white coats and stethoscopes,” Prober said. “Hopefully, the affirmation will have more meaning to you. It will help you to reflect more deeply on the words as you ponder it into the future.”

The book describes how medical staff and patients had to fend for themselves in the days following Hurricane Katrina. After the waters receded, and authorities entered the hospital, 41 bodies were found. Three health-care professionals, including one physician, were arrested for murder. A New Orleans grand jury ultimately refused to indict them on charges of involuntary euthanasia and murder, but exactly what happened during those five days, when temperatures soared, sleep was rare and proper sanitation was nonexistent, remains unclear.

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Cancer, Events, Patient Care, Pediatrics

Girls’ Day Out event helps unite — and nurture — teens battling cancer

Untitled designThere are many treatments, therapies and drugs for cancer, but sometimes a day of pampering with friends is just what the doctor ordered.

That’s why nine teenage girls being treated for cancer at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford  were lavished with a bit of tender loving care — and some quality bonding time — at the seventh annual Girls’ Day Out.

The festivities began at 8:30 on Wednesday night with a limo ride from the hospital to TOVA Day Spa in the Fairmont Hotel in downtown San Jose. At TOVA, teens that had attended Girls’ Day Out events from years before had the opportunity to reconnect, chat and welcome newcomers as they received massages, pedicures, manicures, hairstyling and a gourmet lunch. This story in the San Jose Mercury News explains:

“It’s really fun and a great getaway; it’s really nice to be with people who won’t keep asking ‘what happened to your arm,’ ” said incoming Saratoga High School freshman Simran Mallik, 14. She was left with a scar on her arm after undergoing treatment for Ewing Sarcoma, a type of bone cancer. “I feel like I connect with them more; it’s just easier to communicate.”

Tova Yaron, the owner of TOVA Day Spa, has sponsored this event for the past seven years with support from the Children Having Exceptional Educational and Recreational Support (CHEERS) program that’s a part of the 19 for Life Foundation. At the event, Yaron and her staff donate their time and expertise to create a day of fun, and free spa treatments, for the girls.

TOVA’s spa treatments are a refreshing break from the kind of treatments and therapies the teens are used to receiving as cancer patients, but perhaps the most important gift the girls receive is the opportunity to relax and be themselves among friends who understand what it’s like to be a teenager battling cancer.

“It’s interesting to see how other people are after they’ve gone through (cancer treatment),” said Vivian Lou 15, a student at James Logan High School in Union City who was diagnosed with Wilms Tumor, a type of kidney cancer, five years ago. “It’s nice because I don’t have to feel weird about it because they’ve also been through it.”

“I wish I could do more,” said Yaron. “I am honored, they are lovely girls, they have amazing attitudes, they are brave beyond belief, they are amazing. They are inspiring us with their bravery.”

Previously: Not just for kids: A discussion of play and why we all need to do itHow social connection can improve physical and mental health and The scientific importance of social connections for your health
Photo by Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford

Events, Medical Education, Medical Schools, Stanford News

Aspiring young doctors learn the ropes during Stanford summer program

Aspiring young doctors learn the ropes during Stanford summer program

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Deep in the basement laboratory of Stanford’s Falk Cardiovascular Research Center, 31 high-school and college students stood in awed silence as surgeon Paul Chang, MD, demonstrated on the room’s large screen how to dissect a pig’s heart. After a moment of watching him point out the valves, atria, ventricles and arteries of the organ, students excitedly grabbed the surgical tools in front of them and began their work.

“This is so cool,” exclaimed Daria Arzy, a student at Harvard-Westlake High School in Los Angeles. “I’m more of a hands-on person, so I really enjoy this kind of thing.”

Heart dissection is just one sliver of the Stanford Medicine Clinical Summer Internship, a new program by the Division of General Medical Disciplines that was designed to provide a diverse group of students with an up-close and personal look at the field of medicine.

Department of Medicine Chair Bob Harrington, MD, greeted the participants on their first day and encouraged them to enjoy their time on the Stanford campus. “This is an amazing place,” he shared. “I’m still excited to come to work each day.”

Throughout the course of the two-week program, students learned the foundations of patient care, including how to take a patient’s medical history and vital signs, how to perform a physical exam, and how to administer ultrasounds and injections; practiced surgical techniques; and heard from cardiologists, neurologists, and other experts. “We encountered so many different perspectives,” said Kathy Zhang, a premed student at Vanderbilt University. “It was wonderful to meet medical professionals from different backgrounds and career pursuits.”

The students also had the opportunity to travel to the roof of Stanford Hospital to tour the school’s 50-foot Life Flight helicopter and to visit Stanford’s Center for Immersive and Simulation-based Learning, where they learned how to manage and treat infectious diseases.

During a guest lecture, Chloe Chien, MD, a Stanford medical student graduate and the COO of Homemade, a social healthy cooking program, shared her journey from medical student to startup co-founder. “When I was training to become a surgeon, I suddenly realized that I wanted to help prevent and heal lifestyle diseases like obesity and diabetes,” she said. “So I spoke to patients with chronic diseases to better understand what they were going through.” Chien later engaged the students in a lively discussion about the barriers to healthy lifestyle change, and offered three principles for healthy living: “Cook your own food, listen to your body, and eat whole, natural ingredients.”

On the final day, program organizers handed out certificates and offered their closing remarks to the group: “6 hours in the Stanford anatomy lab, 20 injected oranges, and 31 dissected sheep brains and pig hearts. By any numerical measure, this week has been impressive,” said Program Manager Misty Mazzara. “But this week was never about numbers.  It was about bringing bright young students together to introduce them to the practice of medicine.” Eva Weinlander, MD, who co-organized the internship with Sarita Khemani, MD, agreed, adding: “We have been lucky to spend time with all of you. You’ve all been so enthusiastic, professional, and supportive of each other during this journey.”

As the ceremony came to a close, participants lingered in the auditorium — hugging, taking photos, and exchanging contact information. One student echoed the sentiments of many when she yelled: “Don’t worry everyone, I’m coming back next year!”

Lindsey Baker is the communications manager for Stanford’s Department of Medicine. More photos from the internship program can be found on this Flickr page.

Previously: What’s it like to be an internal medicine resident at Stanford?At Stanford Cardiovascular Institute’s annual retreat, a glimpse into the future of cardiovascular medicine and A look at one high-school student’s summer internship experience at Stanford
Photo by Lindsey Baker

Events, Global Health, Haiti, Medicine and Literature, Patient Care, Stanford News

Physician writers share a “global perspective on healing”

Physician writers share a "global perspective on healing"

6319607736_156bcef31e_zWhen I saw that an event called “Medicine Around the World: Healing from a Global Perspective” was taking place on campus, I thought it would be right up my alley as a medical anthropologist.

The event, sponsored by Stanford’s Medicine and the Muse program and the Pegasus Physician Writers group, was a reading in which physicians shared some beautiful pieces they had written about their experiences providing medical services across the globe, including Haiti, Mexico, Austria, and Vietnam. The musings were less about culture than they were about poverty, conflict, disasters, and war, and what it’s like to seek health and healing in such overwhelming circumstances.

All five physicians’ writings brought to life a difficult scene. Julia Huemer, MD, a child and adolescent psychiatrist, wrote an aching piece about interviewing a young Somalian refugee in an Austrian winter just before Christmas. She conveys the utter incapacity of her survey to capture his experience, and an uneasy awareness that he is the one doing her a favor, indulging her intrusion. Here is a teenager too childlike to carry the weight of adulthood, yet who carries it with more grounded grace than many adults. Her holiday, once marked by stressful emptiness, is not transformed in any heartwarming sense, but at least becomes more heavy, more real.

Ali Tahvildari, MD, a radiologist, composed a “Ghazal for Global Health,” a poetic form used to convey love, loss, and longing, in this case pleading for the privileged to care about foreign suffering. Mali Mann, MD, a psychiatrist, chronicled her experience being one of “los medicos volodores” who fly to Mexico, where she works with orphaned children suffering severe emotional traumas. Henry Ward Trueblood, MD, a trauma surgeon, read an excerpt from his forthcoming book about being a surgeon in Vietnam during the war, where he worked in a tragically understaffed civilian hospital. The extreme environment pushed him to test the limits of his surgical competence, which both challenged him to grow and taught him to respect his own limits when he was way out of his league.

The piece that brought in the most “culture” in a classic anthropological sense was that of William Meffert, MD, a cardiovascular surgeon who read a fictional account of being trapped in a collapsed building in Haiti while on a medical mission after the earthquake. In it, he grappled with how religion – a Haitian mix of voodoo and Catholicism – played a vital role in the life of his assistant. As an atheist, the protagonist vacillated between being baffled, annoyed, and comforted in a way he couldn’t quite grasp; in a way that circled between dream and reality, the supernatural was a means toward healing.

Previously: Stanford doctor-author bring historic figure Jonas Salk to life, Stanford med student chronicles his experiences working in rural Kenya, Surgeon-author: “My intent is to let people know that the person next door could be intersex”, “Write what you know”: Anesthesiologist-author Rick Novak discusses his debut novel, For a group of Stanford doctors, writing helps them “make sense” of their experiences, and Exploring global health through historical literature
Photo by Hanna Sorensson

Events, Medicine and Literature, Medicine and Society, Patient Care, Sexual Health

Surgeon-author: “My intent is to let people know that the person next door could be intersex”

Surgeon-author: "My intent is to let people know that the person next door could be intersex"

None of the Above“How many of you know what intersex is?” surgeon and author Ilene Wong, MD, (who did her residency at Stanford and writes under the pen name I.W. Gregorio) asked an audience of medical students, doctors and community members at a recent panel discussion on the topic on Stanford’s campus.

Since we’d gathered at the event, which was sponsored by Stanford’s Medicine & the Muse Program and Pegasus Physician Writers, to listen to a book reading and discussion about intersex — a term that describes sex characteristics that are neither all female nor all male — you might think we were all well-informed about the topic. We were not, and our fidgety response to Gregorio’s opening question hinted at the problem we came to discuss: a widespread lack of knowledge in the medical, and general, community about intersex individuals.

As Gregorio and her fellow panelists, Jeanne Nollman, founder of the AIS-DSD Support Group, and Hillary Copp, MD, a pediatric urologist at the University of California, San Francisco, delved into the discussion topic – “Has the medical community failed the intersex community?” – we gained a better understanding of what it means to be intersex, why so little is known about it and what can be done to remedy this.

“I met my first intersex patient when I was pregnant with my first child,” Gregorio told us. “It made me think of what it means to be a woman and how your chromosomes determine so much.” At the time, medical students received little training on intersex, Gregorio said. “There’s still a huge gap in medical education on what intersex is. Too often intersex is distilled down to one line on the chalkboard or one question on an exam.”

Her experience inspired Gregorio to write None of the Above, a young adult book about an 18-year old girl who learns she is intersex. “Books help us think about and talk about difficult issues,” she explained. “My intent is to let people know that the person next door could be intersex.”

Intersex is more common than you may think, occurring in approximately one in every 2000 individuals. This means that a person is more likely to be intersex than they are to have cystic fibrosis – yet most people have heard of the latter condition.

So, why isn’t intersex more well known? Nollman and Copp offered some possible explanations. “Many people think [it’s] a dirty thing because it has the word ‘sex’ in it,” said Nollman. “They think it’s something shameful they can’t talk about.”

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Events, Imaging, Neuroscience, Research

Physician-monk leads Stanford doctors in meditation

Physician-monk leads Stanford doctors in meditation

Kerzin and Verghese - smallAfter he finished his recent Grand Rounds talk here at the medical school, and before he opened the room to questions, physician Barry Kerzin, MD, asked the audience of doctors, residents, and a PBS film crew, to silence their cell phones, focus on their breath, and join him for five minutes of meditation.

It made sense because Kerzin, who provides medical care to His Holiness the Dalai Lama and is also a Buddhist monk, had just spent time explaining the central ideas of mindfulness meditation and highlighting the results from various scientific studies on brain changes and the benefits that mindfulness training can bring. Kerzin’s familiarity with the work comes partly from his participation in two of these studies.

As Stanford’s Abraham Verghese, MD, said when introducing Kerzin, many people in the audience may have had their work published in journals like Nature or PNAS, but “who has had [their] brain appear in one of these publications?”

Kerzin’s brain was part of research that compared those of long-term meditators (people who had clocked more than 10,000 hours meditating) to novices’ brains. MRI brain scans revealed increases in size and activity in Kerzin’s and the other monks’ prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain involved with planning and reasoning, as well as empathy and imagination. In one of the studies, Kerzin was hooked up to an EEG machine to demonstrate that when engaged in mindfulness meditation, his brain gave out bursts of high frequency signals called gamma waves, an unusual brain pattern thought to be linked to neural synchrony.

While these studies’ findings pertained to experienced meditators, Kerzin also presented a study where beginners were given either meditation training or health education for six weeks. At the end, when given a stress test, people in the meditation group produced statistically less stress hormones.

Although the most striking differences weren’t seen in beginning meditators, Kerzin also presented a study were volunteers where given either meditation training or health education for six weeks. At the end, when given a stress test, people in the meditation group produced statistically less stress hormones.

Last year I myself participated in a meditation study similar to the ones presented by Kerzin, although the final test in my case was an observation session of the participating parents’ interactions with their toddlers, and measuring stress hormone levels in both. That study hasn’t been published yet, but the subjective view of my husband is that I’m a lot calmer these days as a result of my continued meditation.

Given my experience, I wish I could say I rocked the group meditation at the talk, but I had a hard time concentrating. By focusing on my breathing I could mostly ignore the presentation and applause coming from the room next door. What was harder was blocking out my own thoughts, thoughts of the future – and specifically of writing this blog post. But overall, it was nice to take a moment and try to live in the present.

Kerzin’s talk, called “The science behind meditation,” is available here. Kerzin is also speaking on “Compassionate living” at a Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education event this evening; video of that talk will be available on the CCARE website in coming weeks.

Kim Smuga-Otto is a student in UC Santa Cruz’s science communication program and a writing intern in the medical school’s Office of Communication and Public Affairs.

Previous: What the world needs now: altruism/A conversation with Buddhist monk-author Matthieu Ricard, From suffering to compassion: Meditation teacher-author Sharon Salzberg shares her storyHis Holiness the 17th Karmapa discusses the nature of compassionResearch brings meditation’s health benefits into focus and 10% happier? Count me in!
Photo of Barry Kerzin (left) and Abraham Verghese by Margarita Gallardo

Events, Health and Fitness, Sports, Stanford News, Videos

Stanford Football team physician shares tips for staying healthy while working out

Stanford Football team physician shares tips for staying healthy while working out

Last month, more than 750 people gathered on the Stanford Medicine campus for the annual Health Matters event. There, Jason Dragoo, MD, team physician for Stanford Football and the U.S. Olympic Committee, delivered a talk about preventing injuries and improving fitness performance. As he explains in the above video, he and colleagues dramatically changed the conditioning program for football players over the last five years: gone is the traditional weight room packed with machines and racks and in its place is a training facility stocked with kettle bells, Pilates equipment, medicine balls, wooden sticks and core boards. As a result, the injury rate dropped more than 70 percent and the team’s success has skyrocketed. 

Watch Dragoo’s full presentation and learn how you can apply the workout tactics employed by Stanford Football to avoid injury and improve your own exercise regimen. And check out the Stanford Medicine YouTube channel for more Health Matters videos, including:

Previously: Stanford Medicine’s Health Matters event, in pictures and Stanford’s Health Matters happening on Saturday

Events, Medical Education, Medical Schools, Science, Stanford News

Stanford Medicine grads urged to break out of comfort zone, use science to improve human health

Stanford Medicine grads urged to break out of comfort zone, use science to improve human health

On Saturday, 195 graduates of the School of Medicine sat under a large white tent on the Alumni Green pondering the next chapter in their medical training. Many of them hadn’t been sure if they would make it to this milestone and, for some, the future seemed uncertain. But the message from Lucy Shapiro, PhD, a recipient of the National Medal of Science, was clear, “Step out of your comfort zone and follow your intuition,” she said. “Don’t be afraid of taking chances. Ask, ‘How can I change what’s wrong?'”

Shapiro told the Class of 2015 how she spent years performing solitary work in the laboratory before she “launched a one-woman attack” to influence health policy and battle the growing threat of infectious disease on the global stage. My colleague Tracie White captures Shapiro’s powerful speech in a story today about the commencement ceremony:

Her attack began with taking any speaking engagement she could get to educate the public about antibiotic resistance; she walked the corridors of power in Washington, D.C., lobbying politicians about the dangers of emerging infectious diseases; and she used discoveries from her lab on the single-celled Caulobacter bacterium to develop new, effective disease-fighting drugs.

Her lab at Stanford made breakthroughs in understanding the genetic circuitry of simple cells, setting the stage for the development of new antibiotics. Shapiro told the audience that over the 25 years that she has worked at the School of Medicine, she has seen a major shift in the connection between those who conduct research in labs and those who care for patients in clinics.

“We have finally learned to talk to each other,” said Shapiro, a professor of developmental biology. “I’ve watched the convergence of basic research and clinical applications without the loss of curiosity-driven research in the lab or patient-focused care in the clinic.”

grads walkingShapiro went on to tell the audience that bridging the gap between the lab and the clinic “can make the world a better place.” Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine, agreed with these sentiments and told graduates that there has never been a better time for connecting advances in basic research with breakthroughs in clinical care. “You are beginning your careers at an unprecedented time of opportunities for biomedical science and for human health,” he said.

The 2015 graduating class included 78 students who earned PhDs, 78 who earned medical degrees, and 39 who earned master’s degrees. Among them was Katharina Sophia Volz, the first-ever graduate of the Interdepartmental Program in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine. “Everybody here is reaching for the stars. We can do the best work here of anywhere,” she said.

Previously: Stanford Medicine’s commencement, in pictures, Abraham Verghese urges Stanford grads to always remember the heritage and rituals of medicineStanford Medicine honors its newest graduatesNational Medal of Science winner Lucy Shapiro: “It’s the most exciting thing in the world to be a scientist” and Stanford’s Lucy Shapiro receives National Medal of Science
Photos by Norbert von der Groeben

Events, Medical Education, Medical Schools, Stanford News

Coming up: A big day for Stanford Medicine’s Class of 2015

Coming up: A big day for Stanford Medicine's      Class of 2015

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Tomorrow, Stanford Medicine’s graduating class will walk away from campus with a new title: Doctor!

The speaker for the medical school commencement will be Lucy Shapiro, PhD, whose unique worldview has revolutionized the understanding of the bacterial cell as an engineering paradigm and earned her the 2014 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize and the National Medal of Science in 2013. The diploma ceremony will be held on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Alumni Green in front of the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge.

All of us at Scope wish the very best for the new graduates.

Previously: Match Day at Stanford sizzles with successful matches & good cheer, Abraham Verghese urges Stanford grads to always remember the heritage and rituals of medicine and Stanford Medicine honors its newest graduates
Photo by Andrew

Cancer, Dermatology, Events, Stanford News, Videos

Free skin cancer screening offered on June 13

Free skin cancer screening offered on June 13

Skin cancer is one of the most preventable cancers – and one of the most treatable, if it’s detected early enough. Knowing the possible risk factors, such as fair skin, excessive sun exposure, or atypical moles, might help in recognizing the signs of the disease, and getting a professional screening is also always a good idea.

Each year, Stanford dermatologists offer a free screening for skin cancer; this year’s event is happening Saturday, June 13 from 8:00-11:30 AM at the Stanford General Dermatology Clinic in Redwood City. If you’re a local reader, plan to stop by.

Alex Giacomini is an English literature major at UC Berkeley and a writing and social media intern in the medical school’s Office of Communication and Public Affairs.  

Previously: The importance of sunscreen in preventing skin cancerSkin cancer images help people check skin more often and effectively, and Study shows link between indoor tanning and common skin cancer

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