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Video of Stanford Ebola panel now available

Video of Stanford Ebola panel now available

Last week, a group of Stanford and CDC experts came together to address the health, governance, security and ethical dimensions of Ebola, the virus that is spreading rapidly in West Africa. Video of the lengthy and timely talk, courtesy of the Freeman Spogli Institute, is now available.

Previously: Ebola panel says 1.4 million cases possible, building trust key to containmentInterdisciplinary campus panel to examine Ebola outbreak from all angles, Expert panel discusses challenges of controlling Ebola in West Africa, Should we worry? Stanford’s global health chief weighs in on Ebola and Biosecurity experts discuss Ebola and related public health concerns and policy implications

CDC, Ebola, Events, Global Health, In the News, Infectious Disease

Ebola panel says 1.4 million cases possible, building trust key to containment

Ebola panel says 1.4 million cases possible, building trust key to containment

ebola workers2The Ebola epidemic is spreading rapidly – leaving a wake of suffering – in large part because West Africa has shockingly few medical facilities or trained personnel. But it’s exploding exponentially because of mistrust, a panel of experts told a packed crowd on the Stanford campus last evening.

The numbers, as described by Ruthann Richter in a just-published story, are sobering:

Officially, more than 5,800 Ebola cases and 2,800 deaths from the disease have been reported in four countries: Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. But panelists said those figures were vastly underestimated. At the current rate of spread, in which the number of new infections is doubling every three weeks, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1.4 million people could be infected by the end of January 2015 in the absence of dramatic interventions, said Douglas Owens, MD, a professor of medicine and director of the Center for Health Policy at Freeman Spogli Institute of International Studies.

But even with “very aggressive” intervention, Owens said, it’s estimated there would be at least 25,000 cases by late December. If intervention is delayed by just one month, there will be 3,000 new cases every day; if it’s delayed by two months, there will be 10,000 new cases daily, he said. “It gives you a sense of the extraordinary urgency in terms of time,” Owens told the audience.

During the talk Stanford health-policy expert Paul Wise, MD, screened a CNN video that depicts a man escaping from a treatment facility in Liberia. “You have to create treatment centers that are of the highest quality and that treat people with dignity — so people will want to go there, rather than escape,” he said.

Building trust starts local, Tara Perti, MD, told the audience. She works as a CDC epidemic intelligence service officer and spent time in both Guinea and Sierra Leone this summer:

In Guinea, she traveled to a village north of the capital city of Conakry, where she met two young men who had recovered from the disease, which has a fatality rate as high as 70 percent. One of the men had lost five members of his family, but he had become a community advocate. He traveled with Perti to a neighboring village, where they met a woman who was sick and whose son had died of the disease. “She was very fearful of going to the treatment center… but she was ultimately convinced to seek treatment. She recovered and was able to return home,” Perti said.

“The patient who survived was tremendously helpful because he could speak from experience and be credible. There needs to be more of these. In the forested region of Guinea, there are a lot of superstitions and different beliefs besides germ theory, and so it’s very challenging to go into those areas and help people understand that Ebola is a virus, it’s real and we do have ways to help patients.”

The world’s disjointed response to the epidemic points points to the need for global-health reforms, Michele Barry, MD, director of Stanford’s Center for Innovation in Global Health, concluded.

Becky Bach is a former park ranger and newspaper reporter who now writes about science as an intern at the Office of Communications and Public Affairs. 

Previously: Interdisciplinary campus panel to examine Ebola outbreak from all angles, Expert panel discusses challenges of controlling Ebola in West Africa, Should we worry? Stanford’s global health chief weighs in on Ebola and Biosecurity experts discuss Ebola and related public health concerns and policy implications
Photo, of health workers at an Ebola treatment unit in Liberia, by USAID/Morgana Wingard

Events, Medicine and Society, Stanford News, Videos

How Stanford Medicine celebrated TEDMED

How Stanford Medicine celebrated TEDMED

Earlier this month, TEDMED, an annual global event dedicated to exploring the promise of technology and potential of human achievement in health and medicine, was held simultaneously in San Francisco and Washington D.C. Stanford Medicine served as a medical research institution partner for the event and hosted a reception to cap off Day Two of the three-day conference; the video above captures the evening’s activities and offers a taste of the future of biomedicine.

Previously: Abraham Verghese discusses stealing metaphors and the language of medicine at TEDMED and Stanford Medicine partners with TEDMED on “first-ever gathering on the West Coast”

Ebola, Events, Global Health, Health Policy, In the News, Infectious Disease, Public Health

Interdisciplinary campus panel to examine Ebola outbreak from all angles

Interdisciplinary campus panel to examine Ebola outbreak from all angles

Ebola_091914

Scientists have estimated that the West Africa Ebola epidemic will take another 12-18 months to control and will infect hundreds of thousands of more people during that time. In an opinion piece published last week in the Los Angeles Times, Michele Barry, MD, director of Stanford’s Center for Innovation in Global Health, discussed how the outbreak got so out of control and explains why the “world needs a new approach to solving massive international health crises and preventing future ones.”

Tomorrow on the Stanford campus, Barry will participate in an interdisciplinary forum focusing on the health, governance, security and ethical dimensions of the epidemic. Additional speakers include Doug Owens, MD, a general internist and director of the Center for Health Policy/Primary Care Outcomes Research; microbiologist David Relman, MD, a fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation; Stephen Stedman, deputy director at the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law; and Paul Wise, MD, MPH, a child health specialist and core faculty member of the Center for Health Policy/Primary Care Outcomes Research. Drawing on their diverse backgrounds, the panelists will offer unique perspectives from their respective fields on the latest developments in addressing the outbreak.

The event will be held at 4 PM local time at the Bechtel Conference Center in Encina Hall and is free and open to the public. Conference organizers will also be live tweeting the panel; you can follow the coverage on the @FSIStanford Twitter feed, or by using the hashtag #EbolaForum.

Previously: Expert panel discusses challenges of controlling Ebola in West AfricaShould we worry? Stanford’s global health chief weighs in on Ebola, Biosecurity experts discuss Ebola and related public health concerns and policy implications and Stanford global health chief launches campaign to help contain Ebola outbreak in Liberia
Photo by European Commission DG ECHO

Events, Medicine and Literature, Medicine and Society, Patient Care, Stanford News

Abraham Verghese discusses stealing metaphors and the language of medicine at TEDMED

Abraham Verghese discusses stealing metaphors and the language of medicine at TEDMED

Abraham Verghese TEMED

Few of us pay close attention to metaphors used in the language of medicine. Instead, our focus is typically on words relating to symptoms, test results and diagnoses. But as Stanford physician and author Abraham Verghese, MD, explained last week at TEDMED in San Francisco (which was co-sponsored by Stanford Medicine), metaphors, particularly as they relate to medicine, are significant because “they explain our past… [and] share our present and, perhaps most importantly, the metaphors we pick predicate our future.”

Verghese took conference attendees through a “grand romp through medicine and metaphor” during a session titled “Stealing Smart,” which featured seven speakers and their stories on how stealing something from another field, such as the principles of video game design, could improve medicine. As a child with “no head for math,” Verghese was drawn to the written word and developed a love for metaphors. His physical and metaphorical journey into medicine originated with his childhood reading and, as he sheepishly admitted, his reading list “had a certain prurient bias.” In fact, he selected the novel that set the course of his life, Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham, because the title “had great promise.” Despite it’s lack of salacious content, the book made a lasting impression on Verghese.

He recalled reading about how the protagonist, a boy named Philip who was born with a clubfoot, overcame great adversity to become a physician. The character was intrigued at the variety of patients he meets in the wards of the hospital and marvels at their willingness to open up about their personal lives at a time of distress. In describing the doctor-patient relationship, the author writes, “There was humanity there in the rough.” Those words spoke deeply to young Verghese and “implied to [him] that not everyone could be a brilliant engineer, could be a brilliant artist, but anybody with a curiosity about the human condition, with a willingness to work hard, with an empathy for their fellow human being could become a great physician.” He added, “I came into [the profession] with the sense that medicine was a romantic passionate pursuit. I haven’t stopped feeling that way, and for someone who loved words anatomy was such fun.”

Verghese reveled in the abundance of medical metaphors throughout his training. The prevailing metaphor in anatomy was that of a house, while the overarching metaphor of physiology was that of a machine. When it came to describing symptoms, there was no shortage of metaphors: the “strawberry tongue” associated with scarlet fever, the “peau d’orange” appearance of the breast in breast cancer and the “apple-core” lesion of colon cancer. “That’s just the fruits – don’t get me started on the non-vegetarian stuff,” he joked.

But all of the metaphors noted in his talk are 60-100 years old, and when it came to naming one from more recent times Verghese was at a loss. He said:

In my lifetime, and I suspect in yours, we’ve seen so many new diseases – AIDS, SARS, Ebola, Lyme… We have so many new ways at looking inside the body and scanning the body, such as PET and MRI, and yet, strangely, not one new metaphor, that I can think of… It’s a strange paucity because we are so imaginative. The amount of science that has been done in the last 10 years eclipses anything that was done in the last 100 years. We’re not lacking in imagination, but we may be lacking in metaphorical imagination.

This dearth of metaphor has two consequences, he said. The first is that Congress isn’t funding biomedical research to the level that is necessary to advance new discoveries and treatments. The second is that patients are “not as enamored with our medicine and our science as we might think they should be,” he said. Verghese implored the audience to “create metaphors befitting our wonderful era discovery.” He encouraged those in the crowd and watching the livestream online to accept this challenge, saying, “I want to invite you to name things after yourself. Go ahead! Why not?”

As he closed the talk, Verghese shared the metaphor that has guided his life by saying:

It’s the metaphor of a calling. It’s the metaphor of a ministry of healing. It’s the metaphor of the great privilege we’re allowed, all of us with anything to do with health care, the privilege of being allowed into people’s lives when they are at their most vulnerable. It’s very much about the art of medicine. And we have to bring all the great science, all the big data, all the wonderful things that we’re going to be talking about [at this conference] to bear one human being to another… We have to love the sick. Each and everyone of them as if they were our own. And you know what? They are our own, because we are all humanity there in the rough.

Previously: Abraham Verghese urges Stanford grads to always remember the heritage and rituals of medicine, Inside Abraham Verghese’s bag, a collection of stories and Stanford’s Abraham Verghese honored as both author and healer

Events, Medical Education, Medicine X, Patient Care, Stanford News, Technology

Stanford Medicine X: From an “annual meeting to a global movement”

Stanford Medicine X: From an "annual meeting to a global movement"

MedX_musical_finaleAs Medicine X came to a close Sunday, ePatient and American Idol participant Marvin Calderon Jr. gave a special vocal performance that moved audience members to their feet and ended in an explosion of colorful streamers falling from the top of the main auditorium at the School of Medicine’s Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge.

The three-day event, which was attended by more than 650 people and watched via live webcast by several thousand more, is Stanford’s premier conference on emerging health-care technology and patient-centered medicine. The conference hashtag #MedX was a top-trending term on Twitter in the U.S. throughout the conference, with more than 48,000  tweets sent out between Thursday and Sunday.

Medicine X has historically examined how social media, mobile-health devices, and other technologies influence the doctor-patient relationship. But this year, the program also focused on how partnerships forged between health-care providers, patients and pharmaceutical industry would define the medical team of the future, amplify patients’ voices, and shape medical education. Along with the topics of relationships and connectedness, a number of key themes emerged over the course of the conference, including engagement, empathy, and the imp0rtance of  treating the whole person.

Daniel Siegel, MD, clinical professor of psychiatry at UCLA, touched on several of these themes during his opening talk about developing a healthy mind, an integrated brain, and empathetic relationships. “Our relationships give us a sense of being seen, of feeling felt, of feeling connected. Those are the fundamental ways we create well-being in our bodily lives,” he said. “We live in connection to each other… Relationship experiences that are stressful early in life can lead to medical problems later.”

Several sessions put a special spotlight on the importance of treating the whole person and the link between mental and physical health. Patients shared their experiences with depression and anxiety, and many revealed how they had to grieve the loss of their healthy self in order to accept their new life. They also spoke about how they felt weakened by their mental-health condition and struggled to be empowered, or proactive, in their health care. Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD, MPH, a psychologist and professor of counseling and school psychology at the University of Massachusetts Boston, told patients, “Maybe the ‘e’ in ePatient is not enough. Maybe you need a ‘c’ that stands for connected. If you are connected, then the burden that you are feeling can be shared.”

Larry Chu and patient - smallSentiments about the need to foster empathy in medicine were discussed in parallel panels and during coffee break chats. Emily Bradley, an ePatient with a rare type of autoimmune arthritis, told attendees at a session about invisible pain, “I don’t fault my loved ones for not understanding my pain. I don’t want them to understand and I’m glad that they don’t. I think what’s missing is empathy.” Liza Bernstein, an ePatient advisor and three-time cancer survivor, told attendees at the closing ceremony, “Empathy doesn’t need that much. All empathy needs is us.”

The conference also tried to keep a focus on all different types of patient populations – including those who underserved. “There is a disconnect between solutions being build and the needs of vulnerable populations,” said Veenu Aulakh, executive director of the Center for Care Innovation during a talk on the “no smart-phone” patient. “We need to be designing [solutions] for today, not the future, and the 91 percent of patients that have a text-enabled phone.”

Larry Chu, MD, executive director of the conference (pictured above with Bernstein), warmly greeted the audience each morning – and on Saturday had a special announcement:  the launch of Medicine X Academy, a new effort aimed at continuing to build community among all stakeholders in health care and filling important gaps in medical education. The initiative will include a second conference in 2015 titled Stanford Medicine X ED (currently scheduled for Sept. 23-24, 2015). Joining Chu on stage to talk about the initiative, Bryan Vartabedian, MD, a Baylor College of Medicine physician and a longtime speaker at the conference, told attendees that medical education is “ripe for disruption.” And he noted that Medicine X – which has evolved “from an annual meeting into a global movement,” was poised to take it on.

Speaking of a global movement, there was very much a sense during the weekend that what was happening was bigger than just a conference – with at least one panel moderator telling attendees, “This conversation doesn’t end when we leave the stage.” And Bernstein summed up the three days of panels, presentations and powerful Ignite talks from ePatients saying, “I leave here re-energized, recharged, re-inspired and I hope you do too. Stay in touch on Twitter and see you next year!”

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Medicine X explores the relationship between mental and physical health: “I don’t usually talk about this”, At Medicine X, four innovators talk teaching digital literacy and professionalism in medical school, What makes a good doctor – and can data help us find one?, Medicine X aims to “fill the gaps” in medical education, Stanford Medicine X 2014 kicks off today and Medicine X spotlights mental health, medical team of the future and the “no-smartphone” patient
Photos by Stanford Medicine X

Events, Medicine X, Stanford News, Technology

Countdown to Medicine X: 3D printing takes shape

Countdown to Medicine X: 3D printing takes shape

3D printed handFrom customizing lab equipment to assisting in surgical planning to developing models of proteins and pathogens, 3D printing is helping to reshape biomedical research and health care. This year, Medicine X (which kicks off one week from today) will explore the transformative force of the technology during a range of panels and demonstrations in the “3D Printing and the Future of Medicine” session.

During the session, attendees will have the opportunity to learn more about health-care related 3-D printing applications at the “3-D Experience Zone,” which will showcase technologies from leading manufacturers. Attendees can learn about surgical applications of 3D printing from 3D Systems; find out how 3D Hubs is creating a global community by connecting owners of 3D printers with those who want to utilize the technology; and see how Occipital’s 3D scanning hardware for the iPad is supporting patient care. Additionally, they can discover how Artec creates a 3D full-body scan in a mere 12 seconds and enjoy chocolate and candy from the ChefJet food printer.

The session will also feature two Saturday-afternoon panels titled “Diverse Distributed & Design-Driven” and “Innovation Implementation,” with the latter exploring:

…some of the challenges and issues to consider in this brave new world. Will the FDA approve printed food, pharmaceuticals, and medical devices? How can 3D printing startups include patients in their design process? What are the public health implications when almost anyone can print biomaterials from the comfort of their own home? And once we ensure public safety, how can we make 3D printing affordable and accessible for all?

Darrell Hurt, PhD, computational biologist and project lead for the National Institutes of Health 3D Print Exchange, is among the panelists, and Monika Wittig, director and co-founder of Live Architecture Network, will moderate the discussions.

“As a designer, I am thrilled that this conference continues to widen the view of valuable cross-disciplinary collaborations. This is decidedly the aspect that I found most profound during my first Medicine X experience,” said Wittig. “My hope is attendees leave this session feeling a heightened awareness of 3D design and production technologies and the many realms of potential engagement in health sectors including prototyping, globally-distributed production and mass-customized design.”

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Countdown to Medicine X: Specially designed apps to enhance attendees’ conference experience, Countdown to Medicine X: Global Access Program provides free webcast of plenary proceedings, Countdown to Medicine X: How to engage with the “no smartphone” patient and Medicine X symposium focuses on how patients, providers and entrepreneurs can ignite innovation
Image of 3D printed hand from Medicine X

Events, Medical Apps, Medicine X, Stanford News, Technology

Countdown to Medicine X: Specially designed apps to enhance attendees’ conference experience

Countdown to Medicine X: Specially designed apps to enhance attendees’ conference experience

Figure 3 - BlanketLast year’s Stanford Medicine X conference explored ways in which technology could be used to augment the attendees’ experiences. During breaks between sessions, organizers used specially developed software to transform television screens set up in the lobby outside the main auditorium into interactive spaces where participants could exchange ideas. On one screen, attendees used their mobile phones to text their reflections on previous sessions or respond to prompts such as: “What’s your dream for health care?” The texts appeared as yellow sticky notes on a virtual corkboard. Another screen served as a digital journal where participants could text comments about what they learned and have them displayed to a wider audience. As people walked up to the screen to read the contextually relevant content, they naturally started conversations. In an effort to bridge the divide between the people who were physically present at the conference and those who were watching the live-stream from other locations, an additional screen broadcast tweets from around the world in real time.

This year, conference organizers have developed three iPhone apps for Medicine X based on Apple iBeacon, a Bluetooth-powered location system. “When we heard about the iBeacon technology, it was clear that it would fit really well into a conference setting as well as being useful for allowing people to interact with the large-screen displays,” said Michael Fischer, a PhD student in computer science in the MobiSocial Lab at Stanford, who helped develop the app. “We brainstormed all the possible ways that the iBeacon technology could help people participate in the conference and came up with some ideas that we are excited to test out at the upcoming conference.”

In anticipation of this year’s conference, I reached out to Fischer to learn more about how the apps will further enhance attendees’ experience at Medicine X. Below he explains how they will facilitate networking among participants, allow them to provide feedback or rate speakers and serve as a sort of “flight-attendant call button.”

Can you briefly explain how the apps work?

One app allows us to extend the Wellness Room, so that people can request items without having to go to the room and miss part of a session. The Wellness Room provides special amenities, such as warm blankets or a place to rest, to assist patients in managing their conditions during the conference. The room was designed to help patients physically attend the conference who might have otherwise not been able to. For example, a previous ePatient attendee had a medical condition called cryoglobulinemia, which causes proteins known as cryoglobulins to thicken if the ambient temperature drops too low. If this were to occur, it could lead to kidney failure and would be life threatening. So it’s crucial for this patient to keep warm. Using the iBeacon technology we were able to develop a system that allows people to use an iPhone to request a blanket or other item be delivered to their seat. There will be iBeacons on all the tables in the room so that the phone will automatically know where you are sitting. All the requests will be forwarded to a volunteer who will bring the item directly to the table.

Another app will be used during the breaks to help people get to know each other. The application works by displaying short bios on a nearby TV screen. In this way, the screen acts as a type of watering hole that people can gather around. When new people approach, their bios will be added to the screen. When a person leaves the proximity of the screen, the bio will be removed. We’ll have multiple screens set up around the conference. Our hope is that people can find a group that they might not yet be familiar with. The service is opt-in and people can switch to and from stealth mode at any time. Conference-goers will also have the option to forgo this app altogether.

Lastly, we have developed a feature that will be used at check-in. We want to create an experience that will surprise and delight people from the moment they step into the conference. There is a tradition at Stanford during freshman year that when you first come to your dorm, the dorm staff yells out your name. It is pretty big surprise and makes you feel part of the community instantly. We wanted to replicate that experience as best we could for the conference.

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Events, Medicine X, Stanford News, Technology

Countdown to Medicine X: Global Access Program provides free webcast of plenary proceedings

Countdown to Medicine X: Global Access Program provides free webcast of plenary proceedings

Those unable to physically attend next month’s Stanford Medicine X conference can participate in the event through the Global Access Program, which brings high-quality streaming video of the conference plenary proceedings, live photos and other updates to viewers’ desktop or mobile device. More details on the webcast can be found on the Medicine X blog:

The Global Access team is led by Emmy-award winning television producer Bita Nikravesh Ryan and 2013 Stanford-NBC Global Health Media fellow Hayley Goldbach. Our photography team includes Academy Award-winning documentary filmmaker Theo Rigby, speaker portrait photographer Christopher Kern, and our special venues photographer Yuto Wantanabe.

This year’s Global Access team also welcomes inventor and cancer researcher Jack Andraka.

To participate in the program, you will need to register on the conference website.  Keep in mind that the live stream does not include coverage of breakout sessions, pre-conference workshops, Master Classes or the IDEO Design Challenge.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Countdown to Medicine X: How to engage with the “no smartphone” patient, Medicine X symposium focuses on how patients, providers and entrepreneurs can ignite innovation and Medicine X spotlights mental health, medical team of the future and the “no-smartphone” patient

From August 11-25, Scope will be on a limited publishing schedule. During that time, you may also notice a delay in comment moderation. We’ll return to our regular schedule on August 25.

Ethics, Events, Health Policy, Medicine and Society, Public Health, Transplants

Stanford Health Policy forum on organ-donation crisis now available online

Stanford Health Policy forum on organ-donation crisis now available online

The latest Stanford Health Policy Forum, which focused on ways to end our country’s organ-donor shortage, is now available online. More than 100,000 Americans currently need organ transplants, and the panelists discussed a variety of solutions for solving the problem. Among the ideas brought to the table was a compensation system for donors – an option that was also the focus of an article in today’s San Francisco Chronicle.

Previously: At Stanford Health Policy Forum, panelists dig into the issue of organ donationHow can we end the donor organ shortage?, Stanford visiting professor and founder of kidney-exchange program wins Nobel economics prize and One gift saves three young lives 

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