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Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts of February

Grand Roundup: Top posts of February

The five most-read stories this month on Scope were:

Sticky situation: How sugar affects our health: In this post, a clinical dietician with Stanford Health Care answers questions on the health risks of consuming too much sugar and offers tips on how to cut back.

Math and the brain: Memorization is overrated, says education expert: The research of Jo Boaler, PhD, a Stanford professor of mathematics education, shows that students are better at math when they’ve developed “number sense,” or the ability to use numbers flexibly and understand their logic.

For this doctor couple, the Super Bowl was about way more than football: Neurosurgeon Paul Kalanithi, MD, and his wife, Lucy, won a trip to the Super Bowl by raising money for lung-cancer research and winning the Lung Cancer Survivors Super Bowl Challenge, sponsored by the Chris Draft Family Foundation. Kalanithi was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2013.

Letting go of my secret about Charcot-Marie-Tooth, “the biggest disease no one has heard of”: As part of our Inspire series, a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth shares her story of living with – and opening up about – the disease.

Medical student-turned-entrepreneur harnesses Google Glass to improve doctor-patient relationship: Third-year medical student Pelu Tran is the co-founder of a company that helps doctors with patient record-keeping via Google Glass. Tran was recently named to Forbes’ “30-Under-30: Healthcare.”

Our most-shared story of the month: Sticky situation: How sugar affects our health

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts of January

Grand Roundup: Top posts of January

The five most-read stories this month on Scope were:

Eating for good blood: Tips for boosting iron levels and hemoglobin: This entry discusses hemoglobin levels and offers ways to boost levels prior to blood donation.

In human defenses against disease, environment beats heredity, study of twins shows: A Stanford study involving twins shows that our environment, more than our heredity, plays the starring role in determining the state of our immune system.

Screening for diseases doesn’t necessarily save lives, study shows: According to new research led by Stanford epidemiologist John Ioannidis, MD, DSc, “screening for diseases that can lead to death typically does not prolong life substantially.”

The art of healing: As part of Scope’s Inspire series, a patient shares how art therapy helped her to express and understand her emotions about living with a chronic disease.

Intel’s Rosalind Hudnell kicks off Dean’s Lecture Series on diversity: Diversity is the initial focus of the newly launched Dean’s Lecture Series, and Rosalind Hudnell, chief diversity officer and global director of education and external relations at Intel, was the featured speaker at the Jan. 23 lecture.

Our most-shared story of the month:

In human defenses against disease, environment beats heredity, study of twins shows

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top 5 posts of 2014

The five most-read stories published this year on Scope were:

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

“Stop skipping dessert:” A Stanford neurosurgeon and cancer patient discusses facing terminal illness: Paul Kalanithi, MD, a chief resident in neurological surgery at Stanford, was diagnosed at age 36 with stage IV lung cancer. In this Q&A, he talks about his experiences and about the importance of end-of-life decisions.

Free DIY microscope kits to citizen scientists with inspiring project ideas: Through the Ten Thousand Microscope Project, Manu Prakash is giving away 10,000 build-your-own paper microscope kits to citizen scientists with the most inspiring ideas for how to use his new invention, called the Foldscope.

Top 10 reasons I’m glad to be in medical school: As part of our SMS Unplugged series, medical student Hamsika Chandrasekar highlights ten things she likes about being in medical school. Among them: discount coffee, sleeping in scrubs, and (on a more serious note) “finding meaning every day of my life.”

Knitting as ritual – with potential health benefits?: A piece on The Checkup covers recent research on how activities such as knitting and crocheting may have therapeutic effects in certain populations, including a study in women hospitalized for anorexia.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of Dec. 6

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of Dec. 6

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Role reversal: How I went from med student to ED patient in under two minutes: In the latest installment of our SMS Unplugged series, second-year medical student Hamsika Chandrasekar shares her recent experience as both a trainee and patient in the emergency department.

Stanford Rhodes Scholar heading to Oxford to study ways “the brain can go awry”: Undergraduate Emily Witt is one of two Stanford students selected to receive the prestigious Rhodes Scholarship to study abroad at Oxford next year. In this Q&A, Witt discusses her work and future plans.

Stanford alumni aim to redesign the breast pump: This post features the work of three Stanford graduates who are designing and building a breast pump that is discreet, intuitive, and supportive of mothers.

Blocking a receptor on brain’s immune cells counters Alzheimer’s in mice: In a new study led by Stanford neuroscientist Kati Andreasson, MD, blocking the action of a single molecule situated on the surfaces of certain brain cells was shown to reverse memory loss and a bunch of other Alzheimer’s-like features in experimental mice.

How I’ve survived survivor’s guilt: In this first-person piece, part of our Inspire patient series, a cancer survivor shares that she’s torn between being grateful that she is doing well and feeling anguished over knowing that other cancer patients haven’t made it.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of Nov. 30

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of Nov. 30

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Why I screamed when my boyfriend hugged me: In the latest installment of our SMS Unplugged series, a second-year medical student reflects on her own prejudices and calls for people to admit their imperfections and “to challenge ourselves to be better.”

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

Stanford-led study suggests changes to brain scanning guidelines for preemies: For a just-published study, a group of researchers at Stanford and elsewhere examined what type and timing of brain scans give doctors the greatest ability to predict preemies’ neurodevelopmental outcomes in toddlerhood.

A doctor’s attire – what works best?: A recent article in The Atlantic focused on physicians’ clothing and highlighted the subtle effects a doctor’s dress may have on patients.

How one mom learned the importance of the flu shot – the hard way: In this first-person piece, a mom discusses her daughters’ experience with influenza and shares how it served as a reminder to not become complacent about disease and illness prevention.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of Nov. 16

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

My last promises to her: Advocate for lung cancer awareness and live life to the fullest: In the latest installment of our patient-penned Inspire series, a California man talks about becoming a patient advocate after a lung-cancer diagnosis.

Stanford anesthesiologist explores consciousness – and unconsciousness: Anesthesiologist Divya Chander, MD, PhD, is one of a leading group of neuroscientists and anesthesiologists who are using high-tech monitoring equipment in the operating room to explore the nature of consciousness. She discusses her work in this Q&A.

Learning the pelvic exam with Project Prepare: In this piece, part of the SMS Unplugged series, Hamsika Chandrasekar discusses how a group of patient/educators is teaching medical students the art of performing a delicate exam.

Tackling the stigma of lung cancer – and showing the real faces of the disease: After learning that the first question typically asked of lung cancer patients is “Did you smoke?” Janet Freeman-Daily set out to help change public perception of her disease.

Big data approach identifies new stent drug that could help prevent heart attacks: By using a “big data” computational approach, learning about the genetic pathways involved in coronary artery disease, then testing the new theories on mice models in the lab, researchers at Stanford and Columbia were able to pinpoint a potential new treatment for patients who need stents.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of Nov. 9

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of Nov. 9

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Cheating jet lag: Stanford researchers develop method to treat sleep disturbances: A team of Stanford researchers, led by neurobiologist Jamie Zeitzer, PhD, has developed a technique that helps people shift their sleep cycles by flashing light briefly at their eyes while they sleep. The method could someday be helpful to jet-lagged travelers, as well as shift workers and teenagers who have a hard time getting up at the right time.

Dreaming vs. doing: How my definition of compassion changed during medical school: In the latest installment of the SMS-Unplugged series, medical student Jennifer DeCoste-Lopez discusses her views on caring for patients and comments that she hopes that what “remains and grows stronger throughout my career is the passion for being present with the patient in front of me…”

Stanford scientist Lucy Shapiro: “It never occurred to me to question the things I wanted to do”: Stanford developmental biologist Lucy Shapiro, PhD, was recently awarded the 2014 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize for her achievements in science. She discussed the award, her work, and work-life balance in this Q&A.

Being bilingual “provides the brain built-in exercise”: Research published this week in the journal Brain and Language shows that being bilingual makes the brain more efficient at processing information.

Examining the role of exercise in managing and preventing diabetes: In this Q&A, Baldeep Singh, MD, a clinical professor at Stanford who focuses on chronic disease management, discussed the importance of regular physical activity for patients diagnosed with diabetes and those working to limit their risk of developing the disease.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of Nov. 2

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Memory of everyday events may be compromised by sleep apnea: New research published in the Journal of Neuroscience offers more evidence that sleep apnea can cause difficulty in sufferers remembering where they left their keys and other daily events.

Cheating jet lag: Stanford researchers develop method to treat sleep disturbances: A team of Stanford researchers, led by neurobiologist Jamie Zeitzer, PhD, have developed a technique that helps people shift their sleep cycles by flashing light briefly at their eyes while they sleep. The method could someday be helpful to jet-lagged travelers, as well as shift workers and teenagers who have a hard time getting up at the right time.

The book that made me go to medical school – and other good reads: In response to young readers’ inquiries about which books they should be reading to prepare for a potential future in medicine, second-year medical student Natalia Birgisson offered some suggestions.

Rituals of the body – honoring the loss of bodily wholeness in medicine: As part of Scope’s SMS Unplugged series, MD/PhD student Amrapali Maitra discusses her experience observing an amputation and suggests the initiation of rituals to “help physicians recover the awe and the empathy toward bodies we care for.”

Some headway on chronic fatigue syndrome: Brain abnormalities pinpointed: Stanford researchers conducted an imaging study and discovered distinct differences in the brains of healthy people and those with chronic fatigue syndrome, a disorder that was once written off as a psychiatric phenomenon because no one could figure out what else might be behind it.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of Oct. 26

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Some headway on chronic fatigue syndrome: Brain abnormalities pinpointed: Stanford researchers conducted an imaging study and discovered distinct differences in the brains of healthy people and those with chronic fatigue syndrome, a disorder that was once written off as a psychiatric phenomenon because no one could figure out what else might be behind it.

The book that made me go to medical school – and other good reads: In response to young readers’ inquiries about which books they should be reading to prepare for a potential future in medicine, second-year medical student Natalia Birgisson offered some suggestions.

“Stop skipping dessert:” A Stanford neurosurgeon and cancer patient discusses facing terminal illness: Paul Kalanithi, MD, a chief resident in neurological surgery at Stanford, was diagnosed at age 36 with stage IV lung cancer. In this Q&A, he talks about his experiences and about the importance of end-of-life decisions.

“It’s tough feeling like you’re always in a position to be judged” and other thoughts on medical school: In this post, part of the SMS Unplugged series, medical student Moises Gallegos discusses the intense feeling of scrutiny that comes with medical school and applying for medical residency.

My descent into madness – a conversation with author Susannah Cahalan: In a recent 1:2:1 podcast and Stanford Medicine magazine piece, Paul Costello, the medical school’s chief communications officer, talked with New York Times-bestselling author Susannah Cahalan on her personal experience with mental illness.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Oct. 19

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Oct. 19

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

“Stop skipping dessert:” A Stanford neurosurgeon and cancer patient discusses facing terminal illness: Paul Kalanithi, MD, a chief resident in neurological surgery at Stanford, was diagnosed at age 36 with stage IV lung cancer. In this Q&A, he talks about his experiences and about the importance of end-of-life decisions.

Why “looking dumb” in medical school isn’t such a bad thing: In the latest installment of SMS Unplugged, first-year medical student Nathaniel Fleming describes how asking questions is an important part of early medical training.

“Every life is touched by suicide:” Stanford psychiatrist on the importance of prevention: Laura Roberts, MD, chair of Stanford’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, had the opportunity as editor-in-chief of the journal Academic Psychiatry to focus attention on suicide prevention. She talks about the special issue and about suicide prevention in this Q&A.

Unbroken: A chronic fatigue patient’s long road to recovery: A video and Stanford Medicine magazine story talk about research being done at Stanford on chronic fatigue syndrome and tell the story of CFS patient “Erin.”

Screening could slash number of breast cancer cases: Research published this week in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention by Stanford researchers offers intriguing evidence that genetic screening at birth could help prevent breast cancer.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

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