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Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Week of Oct. 19

Grand Roundup: Week of Oct. 19

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

“Stop skipping dessert:” A Stanford neurosurgeon and cancer patient discusses facing terminal illness: Paul Kalanithi, MD, a chief resident in neurological surgery at Stanford, was diagnosed at age 36 with stage IV lung cancer. In this Q&A, he talks about his experiences and about the importance of end-of-life decisions.

Why “looking dumb” in medical school isn’t such a bad thing: In the latest installment of SMS Unplugged, first-year medical student Nathaniel Fleming describes how asking questions is an important part of early medical training.

“Every life is touched by suicide:” Stanford psychiatrist on the importance of prevention: Laura Roberts, MD, chair of Stanford’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, had the opportunity as editor-in-chief of the journal Academic Psychiatry to focus attention on suicide prevention. She talks about the special issue and about suicide prevention in this Q&A.

Unbroken: A chronic fatigue patient’s long road to recovery: A video and Stanford Medicine magazine story talk about research being done at Stanford on chronic fatigue syndrome and tell the story of CFS patient “Erin.”

Screening could slash number of breast cancer cases: Research published this week in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention by Stanford researchers offers intriguing evidence that genetic screening at birth could help prevent breast cancer.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Week of Oct. 12

Grand Roundup: Week of Oct. 12

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Walking and aging: A historical perspective: An article in The Atlantic this week offered details on recent research into how moderate to vigorous walking can improve mental acuity in aging populations.

How to keep safe while operating on Ebola patients: Two U.S. surgeons with a combined 30 years of working in developing countries have prepared and disseminated well-defined protocols for operating on any patient with the virus or at-risk of having contracting the virus. Stanford surgeon Sherry Wren, MD, and her collaborator discuss this in a San Jose Mercury News op-ed piece.

Healing hands: My experience being treated for bladder cancer: In this Inspire column, an anonymous cancer patient shares his experiences and expresses gratitude for those “whose healing hands, both literally and figuratively, reached out to help me.”

Summer’s child: Stanford researchers use season of birth to estimate cancer risk: Partnering with Lund University, researchers here are using Sweden’s national registries for birth certificates and medical records to track how factors during gestation and soon after birth – called perinatal factors – affect cancer risks.

Stanford experts offer more information about enterovirus-D68: In this Q&A, Yvonne Maldonado, MD, service chief of pediatric infectious disease at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and Keith Van Haren, MD, a pediatric neurologist, discuss the enterovirus-D68 respiratory illness and neurologic symptoms that might be associated with it.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

 

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Oct. 5

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Gamers: The new face of scientific research?: The developers of EteRNA, an interactive online videogame designed to accelerate biochemists’ understanding of RNA, believe the “open laboratory” nature of online games might be a good scientific model.

Zebrafish: A must-have for biomedical labs: This entry links to a recent Vox article highlighting the usefulness of zebrafish in medical research.

Summer’s child: Stanford researchers use season of birth to estimate cancer risk: Partnering with Lund University, researchers here are using Sweden’s national registries for birth certificates and medical records to track how factors during gestation and soon after birth – called perinatal factors – affect cancer risks.

Ebola: A look at what happened and what can be done: “Ebola is unlikely to become a major problem in the developed world,” Stanford law professor Hank Greely, JD, writes in this blog entry. “But… it seems increasingly likely that hundreds of thousands, and quite possibly millions, of men, women, and children will be struck down by this ghastly plague.”

Stanford experts offer more information about enterovirus-D68: In this Q&A, Yvonne Maldonado, MD, service chief of pediatric infectious disease at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and Keith Van Haren, MD, a pediatric neurologist, discuss the enterovirus-D68 respiratory illness and neurologic symptoms that might be associated with it.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Sept. 28

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford experts offer more information about enterovirus-D68: In this Q&A, Yvonne Maldonado, MD, service chief of pediatric infectious disease at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and Keith Van Haren, MD, a pediatric neurologist, discuss the enterovirus-D68 respiratory illness and neurologic symptoms that might be associated with it.

Study: Pregnancy causes surprising changes in how the immune system responds to the flu: New Stanford research shows that immune cells from pregnant women are strongly activated by influenza, which may explain the increased risk of flu complications in pregnancy.

The importance of human connection as part of the patient experience: In a new video, Tim Engberg, vice president of ambulatory care at Stanford Health Care, talks about his experience as a patient at Stanford.

Stanford physicians and engineers showcase innovative health-care solutions: More than 40 inventions and clinical solutions were recently presented at the first annual Spectrum Innovation Research Symposium. The event demonstrated the power of bringing together teams of physicians, bioinformaticists and engineers to apply new technologies and ideas to challenging medical problems.

Examining the potential of big data to transform health care: A KQED segment from earlier this week focused on big data and highlighted a case in which Stanford clinicians used aggregate patient data from electronic medical records to make a difficult and quick decision in the care of a 13-year-old girl with a rare disease.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Sept. 21

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Study: Pregnancy causes surprising changes in how the immune system responds to the flu: New Stanford research shows that immune cells from pregnant women are strongly activated by influenza, which may explain the increased risk of flu complications in pregnancy.

Free online Stanford course examines medical education in the new millennium: At this year’s Stanford Medicine X, executive director Larry Chu, MD, announced the launch of the Medicine X Academy. As part of the academy, a massive open online course (MOOC) course titled “Medical Education in the New Millennium” began this week.

Exercise and your brain: Stanford research highlighted on NIH Director’s blog: In a blog entry, Francis Collins, MD, director of the National Institutes of Health, discussed research by Thomas Rando, MD, PhD, who studies stem cells in muscle and longevity, and Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD, who studies the immune system’s impact on the brain.

Treating an infection to prevent a cancer: H. pylori and stomach cancer: In a Viewpoint piece in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Stanford infectious disease specialist Julie Parsonnet, MD, and her co-authors discuss the link between gastric cancer and chronic infections of Helicobacter pylori.

Discovery may help predict how many days it will take for individual surgery patients to bounce back: Researchers here found that they could predict how well a patient would recover from surgery, based on the activity of a specific set of immune cells. Their work was published in Science Translational Medicine.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Sept. 14

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

So my life will be shorter than I’d hoped – what should I do differently?: In the latest installment of our Inspire patient series, a patient with “stage 4” Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor discusses how his diagnosis has changed how he’s living his life.

Lloyd B. Minor, Stanford medical school’s dean, shares five principles of leadership: One of the highlights of the recent Medicine X conference was a course – “Navigating Complexity and Change: Principles of Leadership” – taught by our own leader, Lloyd B. Minor, MD.

Should we worry? Stanford’s global health chief weighs in on Ebola: In this piece, Michele Barry, MD, professor of medicine and director of Stanford’s Center for Innovation in Global Health, discusses the possibility of the Ebola epidemic spreading to the United States.

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

In a human brain, knowing a face and naming it are separate worries: Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology, and Kalanit Grill-Spector, PhD, associate professor of psychology, have published new research on how our brains process face perception.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Sept. 7

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Skin cancer linked to UV-caused mutation in new oncogene, say Stanford researchers: Researchers here have identified a previously unknown oncogene that drives the development of a common human skin cancer in response to exposure to sunlight.

Proteins from pond scum revolutionize neuroscience: This entry focuses on the work of Stanford bioengineering professor Karl Deisseroth, MD, PhD, who just won the Keio Prize in Medicine,

What makes a good doctor – and can data help us find one?: At Medicine X last Saturday, ProPublica reporter Charles Ornstein posed to conference attendees an important question: How do you find a doctor? “This is trickier than you think,” he said and proceeded to discuss how data can yield helpful information for those looking for (or assessing their current) physician.

At Medicine X, four innovators talk teaching digital literacy and professionalism in medical school: One of the highlights of last weekend’s Medicine X was “Fostering Digital Citizenship in Medical School,” where four esteemed panelists talked about the innovative programs they’ve put in place at their institutions. The physician-speakers all believe that things like understanding social media and knowing how to build one’s digital footprint are crucial skills for doctors-to-be.

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Aug. 31

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Aug. 31

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Breast cancer patients are getting more bilateral mastectomies – but not any survival benefit: The first-ever direct comparison of breast-cancer surgeries shows no survival benefit for women who had both breasts removed compared with women who underwent lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy. In this post, Christina Clarke, PhD, a research scientist and scientific communications advisor for the Cancer Prevention Institute of California, and a member of the Stanford Cancer Institute, discusses the findings and their implications for women.

Can Alzheimer’s damage to the brain be repaired?: Neuroscientist Frank Longo, MD, PhD, director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders, has pioneered the development of small-molecule drugs that might be able to restore nerve cells frayed by conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease.

When it comes to weight loss, maintaining a diet is more important than diet type: A meta-analysis of 48 studies on popular weight-loss programs found that if people stick to their diets (no matter the type) they lost weight, but ultimately the “weight-loss differences between individual diets were minimal and largely unimportant.”

Examining the effects of family time, screen time and parenting styles on child behavior: Results of The Learning Habit Study have shown that limiting screen time, increasing family time, and choosing parenting styles that rely on positive reinforcement are among the things that can help children perform better in school.

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Aug. 24

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

“Sleep drunkenness” more prevalent than previously thought: A phenomenon known as “sleep drunkenness” may be more prevalent than previously thought, affecting as many as 1 in 7 adults, Stanford researchers report in a new study.

Our aging immune systems are still in business, but increasingly thrown out of balance: With advancing age, people grow increasingly vulnerable to infection, autoimmune disease and cancer. New research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests why that may come about.

New painkiller could tackle pain, without risk of addiction: A new pain-reliever may soon be on the scene that lacks the “high” of opioids and the cardiac-risk of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs) drugs such as aspirin. A paper on the development was published this week in Science Translational Medicine.

Civilization and its dietary (dis)contents: Do modern diets starve our gut-microbial community?: In a review paper published last week in Cell Metabolism, Stanford married-microbiologist couple Justin Sonnenburg, PhD, and Erica Sonnenburg, PhD, warn that modern civilization and its dietary contents may be putting our microbial gut communities, and our health, at risk.

Biodesign fellows take on night terrors in children: Stanford’s Biodesign Program trains researchers, clinicians and engineers to be medical-technology innovators during its year-long fellowship. This piece highlights the work of several clinicians who have developed and are now testing a clinical method to treat night terrors in children.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of July 27

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Losing Jules: Breaking the silence around stillbirth: On the anniversary of her son’s death, a San Francisco mom writes a powerful piece on stillbirth. “I had no idea that in this age of medical advancement 1 in every 167 babies in the United States is stillborn,” writes Polly Styker. “Just over half a percent (.6 percent) doesn’t sound like a lot – until it’s you.”

How to get a student-friendly room for under $100: In the latest installment of SMS Unplugged, medical student Natalia Birgisson shows incoming students how to set up their room for under $100.

The woman in the elevator: dealing with death in medical training: In a recent SMS Unplugged entry, medical student Jennifer DeCoste-Lopez shares her insight on dealing with death and loss in medical training.

Stanford partnering with Google [x] and Duke to better understand the human body: Researchers at Stanford, in collaboration with Duke University and Google [x], are planning a comprehensive initiative to understand the molecular markers that are key to health and the changes in those biomarkers that may lead to disease. The project was featured in a Wall Street Journal article last week.

Induced pluripotent stem cell mysteries explored by Stanford researchers: Stanford researchers answer fundamental questions about the use of using pluripotent stem cells in a clinical setting in two new papers in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The work was led by Stanford cardiologist Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, director of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

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