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Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of June 8

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Say Cheese: A photo shoot with Stanford Medicine’s seven Nobel laureates: A video shot earlier this spring captures Stanford Medicine’s seven Nobel Prize laureates preparing for a photo shoot at the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge. The group photo appears on Stanford Medicine’s new website.

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

Living with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: “Sometimes I just don’t have it in me to be inspirational”: In this Inspire column, a patient shares his thoughts about living with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, a rare connective tissue disorder. “Every EDS patient knows that one of the hardest parts of our day is the moment we open our eyes and waken into the reality of our bodies,” Michael Bihovsky writes.

Stanford Medicine partners with TEDMED on “first-ever gathering on the West Coast”: Stanford Medicine has been named a medical research institution partner for TEDMED. The three-day conference will be held Sept. 10-12 and consist of a live, digitally-linked event held simultaneously in San Francisco and Washington, D.C.

Study shows banning soda purchases using food stamps would reduce obesity and type-2 diabetes: In a new study published in this month’s Health Affairs, Stanford researcher Sanjay Basu, MD, PhD, and colleagues created a computer model to simulate the effects of a soda ban on the health of food stamp recipients.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of June 1

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Study shows banning soda purchases using food stamps would reduce obesity and type-2 diabetes: In a new study published in this month’s Health Affairs, Stanford researcher Sanjay Basu, MD, PhD, and colleagues created a computer model to simulate the effects of a soda ban on the health of food stamp recipients.

Buddhist teacher Jack Kornfield on practicing “sensitivity to now”: In a lecture co-sponsored by Stanford’s Ho Center for Buddhist Studies and Stanford Continuing Studies, teacher and author Jack Kornfield, PhD, discussed mindfulness, loving-kindness meditation and graceful living during fast times.

Living with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: “Sometimes I just don’t have it in me to be inspirational”: In this Inspire column, a patient shares his thoughts about living with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, a rare connective tissue disorder. “Every EDS patient knows that one of the hardest parts of our day is the moment we open our eyes and waken into the reality of our bodies,” Michael Bihovsky writes.

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

Early findings show nutrigenomics could make weight loss more efficient: At the recent European Society of Human Genetics meeting in Milan, University of Trieste researcher Nicola Pirastu, PhD, and colleagues presented findings on nutrigenomics showing that diets shaped according to a person’s metabolism may be more effective than non-specialized calorie reduction in helping him or her lose weight.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of May 25

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Living with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: “Sometimes I just don’t have it in me to be inspirational”: In this Inspire column, a patient shares his thoughts about living with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, a rare connective tissue disorder. “Every EDS patient knows that one of the hardest parts of our day is the moment we open our eyes and waken into the reality of our bodies,” Michael Bihovsky writes.

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscope: Manu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

From NICU to nursing home: In the latest installment of SMS Unplugged, first-year medical student Hamsika Chandrasekar writes about the “exciting and humbling” experiences of visiting patients in the NICU and a local nursing home.

Study: Doctors would choose less aggressive end-of-life care for themselves: Most physicians would choose a “no-code” status for themselves if they were terminally ill, a new Stanford study shows. And though other studies have shown that most other Americans would choose to die gently and naturally at home, that’s not what’s happening.

Rising to the challenge of harnessing big data to benefit patients: Thought leaders and innovators from academia, information technology companies, venture capital firms and public health institutions gathered on the Stanford campus last week for the annual Big Data in Biomedicine conference.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of May 18

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Breast cancer awareness: Beneath the pink packaging: Inspire contributor Anne Loeser of Salt Lake City discusses her journey since being diagnosed with breast cancer at age 39, and offers a look at the state of treatment options and survival statistics for patients of the disease.

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscope: Manu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

Introduction to the ICU: My grandfather’s passing gift: In the latest installment of SMS Unplugged, first-year medical student Natalia Birgisson shares lessons learned from a loved one’s time in the ICU.

Big Data in Biomedicine conference kicks off tomorrow: Thought leaders and innovators from academia, information technology companies, venture capital firms and public health institutions gathered on the Stanford campus this week for the annual Big Data in Biomedicine conference.

Increasing access to an anti-overdose drug: In this piece, addiction expert Keith Humphreys, PhD, discusses an important tool in reducing the number of fatal opioid overdoses: naloxone, a drug that rapidly reverses the respiration-suppressing effects of opioids.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of May 11

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Breast cancer awareness: Beneath the pink packaging: Inspire contributor Anne Loeser of Salt Lake City discusses her journey since being diagnosed with breast cancer at age 39, and offers a look at the state of treatment options and survival statistics for patients of the disease.

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

New research shows how to keep diabetics safer during sleep: Stanford pediatric endocrinologist Bruce Buckingham, MD, and colleagues have found a method to predict and prevent dangerously low overnight blood sugars in adolescents and adults with type-1 diabetes.

Please stop calling doctors “newly minted”: In the latest installment of the SMS Unplugged series, medical student Jennifer DeCoste-Lopez explains why the term “newly minted” in reference to new physicians “is ironic at best, and insulting at worst.”

Research brings meditation’s health benefits into focus: A Huffington Post piece and infographic summarize research findings on some of the key health benefits associated with meditation. The article links to a previous Scope entry with comment from Stanford health psychologist Kelly McGonigal, PhD.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of May 4

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

Step away from the DNA? Circulating *RNA* in blood gives dynamic information about pregnancy, health: Stanford bioengineer Stephen Quake, PhD, and colleagues have generated a dynamic picture of how tissues develop by monitoring changing levels of RNA in the blood, enabling them to better understand what the body is doing and why.

The rechargeable brain: Blood plasma from young mice improves old mice’s memory and learning: A recent study (subscription required) shows something in the blood of young mice has the ability to restore mental capabilities in old mice, which could spell a new paradigm for recharging aging brains. Stanford brain-degeneration expert Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD, is the paper’s senior author.

Two decades with scleroderma: How I find answers to hard-to-solve questions: Scleroderma patient Melissa Ward writes about her experience living with the disorder, from her diagnosis at age 15 to treatment with Stanford rheumatologist Lorinda Chung, MD, and surgeon James Chang, MD.

Ah…OM: Study shows prenatal yoga may relieve anxiety in pregnant women: A study from the University of Manchester and Newcastle University found that women in their late second to third trimesters who attended weekly prenatal yoga classes demonstrated less pregnancy-related anxiety than those who underwent normal prenatal treatment.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of April 27

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

This is your brain on a computer chip: Stanford bioengineer Kwabena Boahen, PhD, and graduate student Ben Varkey Benjamin have modeled one million neurons in real time on a circuit-board called Neurogrid that contains sixteen chips called Neurocores. An accompanying video shows how the team is working with Neurogrid to drive robot movement.

Changing views on dietary fiber’s role in weight loss: As reported by Nature News, a recent study has found that dietary fiber’s role in weight loss, commonly attributed to releasing appetite-suppressing hormones in the gut, may be a matter of the mind.

Stanford’s senior associate dean of medical education talks admissions, career paths: In a video from this year’s Med School 101, Charles Prober, MD, senior associate dean of medical education at Stanford, discussed medical specialties and opportunities in research, education and patient care that someone with an MD can pursue. He also described factors the School of Medicine’s admissions team considers when selecting candidates.

Knitting as ritual – with potential health benefits?: A piece on The Checkup covers recent research on how activities such as knitting and crocheting may have therapeutic effects in certain populations, including a study in women hospitalized for anorexia.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of April 20

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Knitting as ritual – with potential health benefits?: A piece on The Checkup covers recent research on how activities such as knitting and crocheting may have therapeutic effects in certain populations, including a study in women hospitalized for anorexia.

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

New Stanford center aims to promote research excellence: The new Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford aims to improve the reproducibility, efficiency and quality of scientific investigations. METRICS co-founders Steven Goodman, MD, MHS, PhD, and John Ioannidis, MD, DSc, discuss the center in two videos and a 1:2:1 podcast.

Thoughts light up with new Stanford-designed tool for studying the brain: Bioengineer Michael Lin, MD, PhD, and biologist and applied physicist Mark Schnitzer, PhD, have developed a tool used to watch nerves fire in real time. A Stanford News piece notes that the technique could help in developing therapies for brain diseases.

The state of Alzheimer’s research: A conversation with Stanford neurologist Michael Greicius: In a 1:2:1 podcast, Michael Greicius, MD, discussed the state of Alzheimer’s research and his recent study on how the ApoE4 variant doubles the risk of Alzheimer’s for women.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of April 13

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

A wake-up call from a young e-patient: “I need to be heard”: In this piece, 15-year-old Inspire contributor Morgan Gleason writes about living with the rare autoimmune disease juvenile dermatomyositis. A video about challenges she’s faced during her hospital stays has been widely shared.

Home videos could help diagnose autism, says new Stanford study: Short home videos, such as those posted on YouTube, may become a powerful tool for diagnosing autism, according to a new study from Dennis Wall, MD, associate professor of pediatrics in systems medicine.

Having a copy of ApoE4 gene variant doubles Alzheimer’s risk for women but not for men: A study led by Mike Greicius, MD, medical director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders, shows that carrying a copy of a gene variant called ApoE4 confers a substantially greater risk for Alzheimer’s disease on women than it does on men.

My fifth-year comeback: In the latest installment of SMS Unplugged, medical student Moises Gallegos reflects on the lessons, encounters and unforgettable moments he experienced during his clerkships.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of April 6

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

Music box inspires a chemistry set for kids and scientists in developing countries: Manu Prakash has also developed a chemistry set that can be built with materials costing about $5. The device won a contest from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Society for Science & the Public to “Reimagine the chemistry set for the 21st century.”

Blood will tell: In Stanford study, tiny bits of circulating tumor DNA betray hidden cancers: A blood sample may one day be enough to diagnose many types of solid cancers, or to monitor the amount of solid cancer in a patient’s body, researchers in the labs of Stanford radiation oncologist Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD, and hematologist and oncologist Ash Alizadeh, MD, PhD, have shown.

Art and anatomy: Decades-old collaboration brings augmented reality into the hands of Rodin: Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center launched a first-of-its-kind exhibit, “Inside Rodin’s Hands: Art, Technology, and Surgery,” which uses 21st Century technology to look inside the works of Rodin’s 19th Century sculptures.

Bad news for pill poppers? Little clear evidence for Vitamin D efficacy, says Stanford’s John Ioannidis: A large study of vitamin D led by John Ioannidis, MD, DSc, found that more well-designed studies and trials are necessary before firm conclusions can be drawn about its efficacy.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

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