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Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of March 9

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

Free DIY microscope kits to citizen scientists with inspiring project ideas: Through the Ten Thousand Microscope Project, Manu Prakash is giving away 10,000 build-your-own paper microscope kits to citizen scientists with the most inspiring ideas for how to use his new invention, called the Foldscope.

Stanford microscope inventor featured on TED Talk: In a TED Talk video, Manu Prakash builds and demonstrates his 50-cent paper microscope.

Study: Baby sound machines may be too loud for little ears: A recent study published in Pediatrics finds that sound machines meant to soothe babies may actually do more harm than good. Nanci Yuan, MD, pulmonologist and sleep medicine specialist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, comments on the research.

E-Cigarettes: The explosion of vaping is about to be regulated: In a 1:2:1 podcast, Robert Jackler, MD, chief of otolaryngology at Stanford, talks with med school communications chief Paul Costello about the health hazards of e-cigarettes and recent efforts to regulate their sale.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of March 2

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

A closer look at the autoimmune disease vasculitis: In this entry, Cornelia Weyand, MD, PhD, professor and chief of immunology and rheumatology, answers questions about vasculitis. The condition, which involves inflammation in the blood vessels, was in the news last week following the death of writer/actor/director Harold Ramis.

8 reasons medical school debt won’t control my life: In this week’s SMS Unplugged post, Jennifer DeCoste-Lopez outlines steps she’s using to manage debt while completing med school.

Elastic for floppy nerves: Stanford Bio-X scientists have found the secret to how nerves withstand the wear and tear of bending joints and moving tissues: an elastic-like protein matrix that keeps them resilient.

Simultaneous treatment for several food allergies passes safety hurdle, Stanford team shows: A team led by Kari Nadeau, MD, PhD, found that an experimental treatment already being widely tested for single food allergies, called oral immunotherapy, could be modified so that patients can be desensitized to multiple food allergens at the same time.

The ultramarathoner’s heart: An article in the recent issue of Stanford Medicine magazine describes visionary Silicon Valley product designer Mike Nuttall‘s experiences with hereditary heart disease and ultramarathon running.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of February 23

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford’s Abraham Verghese honored as both author and healer: Stanford physician and best-selling author Abraham Verghese, MD, recently received a $250,000 Heinz Award for Arts and Humanities honoring his work combining medicine and literature.

Stanford physician leading efforts to track emerging polio-like illness in California children: A polio-like illness has afflicted a small number of children in California since 2012, causing severe weakness or rapid paralysis in one or more limbs. Keith Van Haren, an instructor of neurology and neurological sciences with Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, is the primary author of an abstract that describes five of the cases.

Simultaneous treatment for several food allergies passes safety hurdle, Stanford team shows: A team led by Kari Nadeau, MD, PhD, found that an experimental treatment already being widely tested for single food allergies, called oral immunotherapy, could be modified so that patients can be desensitized to multiple food allergens at the same time.

New Girl: Living the sitcom in medical school: In the latest installment of SMS Unplugged, first-year medical student Natalia Birgisson writes about her experiences going through medical school while living with two male roommates.

Dick Cheney on his heart transplant: “It’s the gift of life itself”:  Former Vice President Dick Cheney talked about his heart transplant and life after near death in a 1:2:1 podcast hosted by Paul Costello, the medical school’s chief communications officer.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of February 16

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of February 16

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Top 10 reasons I’m glad to be in medical school: As part of our SMS Unplugged series, first-year medical student Hamsika Chandrasekar highlights ten things she likes about being in medical school. Among them: discount coffee, sleeping in scrubs, and (on a more serious note) “finding meaning every day of my life.”

Stanford study finds Lyme disease among ticks in California parks: Ticks infected with the bacterium at the root of Lyme disease have been found roaming California parks, as described in a Stanford study to be published in Emerging Infectious Disease. The findings, Ana Thompson, executive director of the Bay Area Lyme Foundation, said in a Stanford Report piece, are “an important step toward dispelling the perception that you cannot acquire Lyme disease in California.”

New Stanford-developed method finds tumors in children without exposing them to radiation: Researchers here have developed a way to scan young cancer patients’ bodies for tumors without exposing them to radiation. The technique could reduce patients’ risk of developing secondary cancers later in life.

Sleep on it: The quest for rest in the modern hospital: In this SMS Unplugged entry, medical student Mihir Gupta writes about helping hospital patients rest and heal. “As students,” he writes, “we can at least identify role models who are the kind of physicians we want to be – physicians who notice when a patient is sleeping and decide, ‘I’ll come back later.’”

A physician shares his story of being diagnosed with amyloidosis: In a recent Stanford Hospital video, Kevin Anderson, MD, shares his story of working with Ron Witteles, MD, co-director of the Stanford Amyloid Center, to receive a heart transplant and get his health back on track after receiving a diagnosis of amyloidosis.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of February 9

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Top 10 reasons I’m glad to be in medical school: In the latest installment of our SMS Unplugged series, first-year medical student Hamsika Chandrasekar highlights ten things she likes about being in medical school. Among them: discount coffee, sleeping in scrubs, and (on a more serious note) “finding meaning every day of my life.”

A rare cancer survivor’s journey to thriving and advocating: Here, an Inspire contributor shares her experience being diagnosed with a rare type of tumor and discusses why she became involved in patient advocacy. “I couldn’t live with the fact that no one knew much about this insidious disease and that research dedicated to pancreatic cancer lagged so far behind other major cancers,” she writes.

New Stanford-developed sweat test may aid in development of cystic fibrosis treatments: This blog entry discusses a development that could someday lead to more targeted treatment for cystic fibrosis, a recessive genetic disorder that affects the lungs and digestive system.

A physician shares his story of being diagnosed with amyloidosis: In a recent video, Kevin Anderson, MD, shares his story of working with Ron Witteles, MD, co-director of the Stanford Amyloid Center, to receive a heart transplant and get his health back on track after receiving a diagnosis of amyloidosis.

Stanford-developed device shown to reduce the size of existing scars in clinical trial: A device invented by School of Medicine researchers has demonstrated in a small clinical trial that it can help decrease the size of existing scars when used after scar-revision surgery.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of February 2

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of February 2

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Hawkeye Pierce (i.e. Alan Alda) teaches scientists how to better communicate about their work: During a recent workshop with Stony Brook University’s Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, Stanford scientists practiced speaking and writing effectively about their work and learned which theater skills could be useful in building public interest in research.

Humble anti-fungal pill appears to have a noble side-effect: treating skin cancer: A new study led by Stanford dermatologist Jean Tang, MD, PhD, shows that a common anti-fungal treatment called itraconazole may be useful in treating basal cell carcinoma – the most common form of skin cancer.

The remarkable impact of yoga breathing for trauma: In this piece, Emma Seppala, PhD, associate director of Stanford’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education, discusses the effectiveness of yoga breathing for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.

You are what you read: The academic diet of the 21st-century medical student: Here, third-year medical student Mihir Gupta discusses the recent explosion of printed and digital medical resources that offer students alternatives to the classic texts that previous generations swore by. Gupta’s piece is the third installment in Scope’s weekly SMS Unplugged series.

Another piece of the pulmonary-hypertension puzzle gets plugged into place: A new study led by Marlene Rabinovitch, MD, and her colleagues at Stanford’s Vera Moulton Wall Center provides more insight on pulmonary hypertension, a dangerous increase in the pressure of blood vessels in the lung.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of January 26

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Permission: Learning to thrive in medicine by breaking my own rules: In the latest installment of SMS Unplugged, Stanford medical student Jennifer DeCoste-Lopez writes about fulfilling her passion for medicine – and honoring her desire to become a parent.

Hawkeye Pierce (i.e. Alan Alda) teaches scientists how to better communicate about their work: During a recent workshop with Stony Brook University’s Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, Stanford scientists practiced speaking and writing effectively about their work and learned which theater skills could be useful in building public interest in research.

You are what you read: The academic diet of the 21st-century medical student: Here, third-year medical student Mihir Gupta discusses the recent explosion of printed and digital medical resources that offer students alternatives to the classic texts that previous generations swore by. Gupta’s piece is the third installment in Scope’s weekly SMS Unplugged series.

A Stanford physician’s take on cancer prognosesPaul Kalanithi, MD, a chief resident in neurological surgery at Stanford, describes his experience as a cancer patient in a New York Times SundayReview piece.

Coming soon: A genome test that costs less than a new pair of shoes: At the sixth annual Personalized Medicine World Conference in Mountain View, Calif., industry leaders and academics discussed the falling price of genome sequencing. Amir Dan Rubin, president and CEO of Stanford Hospital & Clinics, gave a keynote talk at the start of the conference.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of January 19

The five most-read stories published this week on Scope were:

You are what you read: The academic diet of the 21st-century medical student: Here, third-year medical student Mihir Gupta discusses the recent explosion of printed and digital medical resources that offer students alternatives to the classic texts that previous generations swore by. Gupta’s piece is the third installment in Scope’s weekly SMS Unplugged series.

We just had the best two months in the history of U.S. mental-health policy: Thanks to three critical pieces of federal legislation, which are outlined here by Stanford addiction expert Keith Humphreys, PhD, the past two months have brought the “most expansive support for mental-health services in U.S. history.”

Another piece of the pulmonary-hypertension puzzle gets plugged into place: This entry discusses a new Journal of Experimental Medicine study led by Marlene Rabinovitch, MD, that sheds light on pulmonary hypertension, a mysterious disease marked by a dangerous increase in the pressure of blood vessels in the lung.

Helping older adults live independently using mobile-health technology: A Washington Post article from earlier this week discussed home-use medical devices that track behavior and vital signs in older adults to share with their doctors. Keeping tabs remotely could let an aging population stay in their homes longer.

A rare-disease patient turns to the Internet for comfort, confidence in managing her condition: In a recent Atlantic piece, writer Simona Supekar explained how her diagnosis of a rare disease prompted her to turn to the Internet to cope with the condition.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of January 12

The five most-read stories published this week on Scope were:

Basement floods, ski lifts, and Christmas cookies: Life lessons from winter break: In the second installment of Scope’s weekly SMS Unplugged series, Natalia Birgisson reflects on her first winter break as a medical student.

Saying thank you with art: Stanford undergrad pens one-woman play on cancer: Stanford senior Camille Brown has written a one-woman play called “Seeing the Spectrum.” The show is a series of intimate monologues telling the story of Camp Kesem at Stanford – a summer camp for the children of cancer patients – from the campers’ perspective.

Managing primary care patients’ risky drinking: Centers for Disease Control Director Thomas Frieden, MD, has called for more physicians to screen patients for risky alcohol consumption. In this entry, Keith Humphreys, PhD, outlines three barriers that have stood in the way of the screening and offers possible solutions.

Measuring the physical effects of yoga for seniors: The physical demands, efficacy, and safety of yoga for older adults have not been well studied. So investigators from the University of Southern California and University of California, Los Angeles conducted NIH-funded research to quantify the physical effects of seven yoga poses in 20 ambulatory older adults.

New preeclampsia toolkit will help prevent maternal deaths: The California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative has released a preeclampsia toolkit, including guidelines and education materials, to help prevent maternal deaths. Stanford’s Maurize Druzin, MD, co-led a task force that reviewed scientific literature on the disease. 

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of January 5

The five most-read stories published this week on Scope were:

Introducing SMS Unplugged: First-year med student Hamsika Chandrasekar kicks off Scope’s weekly SMS Unplugged series, which will feature pieces written by School of Medicine students reflecting on their experiences.

Social learning in a medical photo-sharing app for doctors: In this Q&A, Joshua Landy, MD, co-founder of Figure 1, discusses the free medical photo-sharing app and his time as a visiting scholar at Stanford.

Study shows happiness and meaning in life may be different goals: Stanford News reports on a recent study identifying five key differences between a meaningful life and a happy one.

Stanford among the beneficiaries of major gift from Ludwig Cancer Research: The School of Medicine has received $90 million from Ludwig Cancer Research to support the school’s innovative work in cancer stem cells, which are believed to drive the growth of many cancers.

Studying pediatric sleep disorders an “integral part” of the future of sleep medicine: Sleep specialist Rafael Pelayo, MD, writes about Stanford’s historic role in the development of sleep medicine, including work done with infants and children, in a recent entry on Stanford Sleep Center’s blog.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

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