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Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of April 13

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

A wake-up call from a young e-patient: “I need to be heard”: In this piece, 15-year-old Inspire contributor Morgan Gleason writes about living with the rare autoimmune disease juvenile dermatomyositis. A video about challenges she’s faced during her hospital stays has been widely shared.

Home videos could help diagnose autism, says new Stanford study: Short home videos, such as those posted on YouTube, may become a powerful tool for diagnosing autism, according to a new study from Dennis Wall, MD, associate professor of pediatrics in systems medicine.

Having a copy of ApoE4 gene variant doubles Alzheimer’s risk for women but not for men: A study led by Mike Greicius, MD, medical director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders, shows that carrying a copy of a gene variant called ApoE4 confers a substantially greater risk for Alzheimer’s disease on women than it does on men.

My fifth-year comeback: In the latest installment of SMS Unplugged, medical student Moises Gallegos reflects on the lessons, encounters and unforgettable moments he experienced during his clerkships.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of April 6

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

Music box inspires a chemistry set for kids and scientists in developing countries: Manu Prakash has also developed a chemistry set that can be built with materials costing about $5. The device won a contest from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Society for Science & the Public to “Reimagine the chemistry set for the 21st century.”

Blood will tell: In Stanford study, tiny bits of circulating tumor DNA betray hidden cancers: A blood sample may one day be enough to diagnose many types of solid cancers, or to monitor the amount of solid cancer in a patient’s body, researchers in the labs of Stanford radiation oncologist Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD, and hematologist and oncologist Ash Alizadeh, MD, PhD, have shown.

Art and anatomy: Decades-old collaboration brings augmented reality into the hands of Rodin: Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center launched a first-of-its-kind exhibit, “Inside Rodin’s Hands: Art, Technology, and Surgery,” which uses 21st Century technology to look inside the works of Rodin’s 19th Century sculptures.

Bad news for pill poppers? Little clear evidence for Vitamin D efficacy, says Stanford’s John Ioannidis: A large study of vitamin D led by John Ioannidis, MD, DSc, found that more well-designed studies and trials are necessary before firm conclusions can be drawn about its efficacy.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of March 30

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

Free DIY microscope kits to citizen scientists with inspiring project ideas: Through the Ten Thousand Microscope Project, Manu Prakash is giving away 10,000 build-your-own paper microscope kits to citizen scientists with the most inspiring ideas for how to use his new invention, called the Foldscope.

The brain whisperer: Stanford neurologist talks about his work, shares tips with aspiring doctors: Last week at Med School 101, neurologist Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD, shared with high-school students how he collaborated with musician Chris Chafe, PhD, on a “brain stethoscope” that can translate brainwaves into music.

Bad news for pill poppers? Little clear evidence for Vitamin D efficacy, says Stanford’s John Ioannidis: A large study of vitamin D led by John Ioannidis, MD, DSc, found that more well-designed studies and trials are necessary before firm conclusions can be drawn about its efficacy.

Double vision: How the brain creates a single view of the world: Carla Shatz, PhD, Stanford Bio-X director, has shown that a protein originally known for its role in the immune system, called MHC Class I D, or D for short, is present in the nerves of the developing brain.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of March 23

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

Free DIY microscope kits to citizen scientists with inspiring project ideas: Through the Ten Thousand Microscope Project, Manu Prakash is giving away 10,000 build-your-own paper microscope kits to citizen scientists with the most inspiring ideas for how to use his new invention, called the Foldscope.

At Match Day 2014, Stanford med students take first steps as residents: During Match Day 2014, medical students around the country learned where they would be paired to begin residency. Tracie White reports on this year’s event from the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge, where Stanford students opened envelopes containing the news.

Stanford microscope inventor featured on TED Talk: In a TED Talk video, Manu Prakash builds and demonstrates his 50-cent paper microscope.

What the experience of Swedish snuff can teach us about e-cigarettes: Addiction expert Keith Humphreys, PhD, uses the example of Swedish snuff (known as “snus”) to examine the fundamental question at play in the current e-cigarette debate: Would it be a net harm or a net benefit to public health?

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of March 16

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

Match Day 2014: Good luck, medical students!: Medical students at Stanford, and thousands more around the United States, gathered for the annual Match Day celebration. Surrounded by family, friends and faculty members, students opened envelopes to learn where they would be “matched” for their residencies.

Free DIY microscope kits to citizen scientists with inspiring project ideas: Through the Ten Thousand Microscope Project, Manu Prakash is giving away 10,000 build-your-own paper microscope kits to citizen scientists with the most inspiring ideas for how to use his new invention, called the Foldscope.

Life-saving dollar-a-dose rotavirus vaccine attains clinical success in advanced India trial: A new rotavirus vaccine has leaped the safety and efficacy thresholds of a late-stage clinical trial, in which more than 6,500 Indian infants were inoculated, and will likely become available in that country for less than a dollar a dose. Stanford’s Harry Greenberg, MD, is co-author of both a study and an accompanying perspective piece published in The Lancet.

Restless legs syndrome, most common in old age, appears to be programmed in the womb: A group led by Juliane Winkelmann, MD, professor of neurology, has pinpointed for the first time the anatomical region in the brain where the programming for restless leg syndrome takes place.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of March 9

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeManu Prakash, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering, has developed an ultra-low-cost paper microscope to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions. The device is further described in a technical paper.

Free DIY microscope kits to citizen scientists with inspiring project ideas: Through the Ten Thousand Microscope Project, Manu Prakash is giving away 10,000 build-your-own paper microscope kits to citizen scientists with the most inspiring ideas for how to use his new invention, called the Foldscope.

Stanford microscope inventor featured on TED Talk: In a TED Talk video, Manu Prakash builds and demonstrates his 50-cent paper microscope.

Study: Baby sound machines may be too loud for little ears: A recent study published in Pediatrics finds that sound machines meant to soothe babies may actually do more harm than good. Nanci Yuan, MD, pulmonologist and sleep medicine specialist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, comments on the research.

E-Cigarettes: The explosion of vaping is about to be regulated: In a 1:2:1 podcast, Robert Jackler, MD, chief of otolaryngology at Stanford, talks with med school communications chief Paul Costello about the health hazards of e-cigarettes and recent efforts to regulate their sale.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of March 2

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

A closer look at the autoimmune disease vasculitis: In this entry, Cornelia Weyand, MD, PhD, professor and chief of immunology and rheumatology, answers questions about vasculitis. The condition, which involves inflammation in the blood vessels, was in the news last week following the death of writer/actor/director Harold Ramis.

8 reasons medical school debt won’t control my life: In this week’s SMS Unplugged post, Jennifer DeCoste-Lopez outlines steps she’s using to manage debt while completing med school.

Elastic for floppy nerves: Stanford Bio-X scientists have found the secret to how nerves withstand the wear and tear of bending joints and moving tissues: an elastic-like protein matrix that keeps them resilient.

Simultaneous treatment for several food allergies passes safety hurdle, Stanford team shows: A team led by Kari Nadeau, MD, PhD, found that an experimental treatment already being widely tested for single food allergies, called oral immunotherapy, could be modified so that patients can be desensitized to multiple food allergens at the same time.

The ultramarathoner’s heart: An article in the recent issue of Stanford Medicine magazine describes visionary Silicon Valley product designer Mike Nuttall‘s experiences with hereditary heart disease and ultramarathon running.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of February 23

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford’s Abraham Verghese honored as both author and healer: Stanford physician and best-selling author Abraham Verghese, MD, recently received a $250,000 Heinz Award for Arts and Humanities honoring his work combining medicine and literature.

Stanford physician leading efforts to track emerging polio-like illness in California children: A polio-like illness has afflicted a small number of children in California since 2012, causing severe weakness or rapid paralysis in one or more limbs. Keith Van Haren, an instructor of neurology and neurological sciences with Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, is the primary author of an abstract that describes five of the cases.

Simultaneous treatment for several food allergies passes safety hurdle, Stanford team shows: A team led by Kari Nadeau, MD, PhD, found that an experimental treatment already being widely tested for single food allergies, called oral immunotherapy, could be modified so that patients can be desensitized to multiple food allergens at the same time.

New Girl: Living the sitcom in medical school: In the latest installment of SMS Unplugged, first-year medical student Natalia Birgisson writes about her experiences going through medical school while living with two male roommates.

Dick Cheney on his heart transplant: “It’s the gift of life itself”:  Former Vice President Dick Cheney talked about his heart transplant and life after near death in a 1:2:1 podcast hosted by Paul Costello, the medical school’s chief communications officer.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of February 16

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of February 16

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Top 10 reasons I’m glad to be in medical school: As part of our SMS Unplugged series, first-year medical student Hamsika Chandrasekar highlights ten things she likes about being in medical school. Among them: discount coffee, sleeping in scrubs, and (on a more serious note) “finding meaning every day of my life.”

Stanford study finds Lyme disease among ticks in California parks: Ticks infected with the bacterium at the root of Lyme disease have been found roaming California parks, as described in a Stanford study to be published in Emerging Infectious Disease. The findings, Ana Thompson, executive director of the Bay Area Lyme Foundation, said in a Stanford Report piece, are “an important step toward dispelling the perception that you cannot acquire Lyme disease in California.”

New Stanford-developed method finds tumors in children without exposing them to radiation: Researchers here have developed a way to scan young cancer patients’ bodies for tumors without exposing them to radiation. The technique could reduce patients’ risk of developing secondary cancers later in life.

Sleep on it: The quest for rest in the modern hospital: In this SMS Unplugged entry, medical student Mihir Gupta writes about helping hospital patients rest and heal. “As students,” he writes, “we can at least identify role models who are the kind of physicians we want to be – physicians who notice when a patient is sleeping and decide, ‘I’ll come back later.’”

A physician shares his story of being diagnosed with amyloidosis: In a recent Stanford Hospital video, Kevin Anderson, MD, shares his story of working with Ron Witteles, MD, co-director of the Stanford Amyloid Center, to receive a heart transplant and get his health back on track after receiving a diagnosis of amyloidosis.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of February 9

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Top 10 reasons I’m glad to be in medical school: In the latest installment of our SMS Unplugged series, first-year medical student Hamsika Chandrasekar highlights ten things she likes about being in medical school. Among them: discount coffee, sleeping in scrubs, and (on a more serious note) “finding meaning every day of my life.”

A rare cancer survivor’s journey to thriving and advocating: Here, an Inspire contributor shares her experience being diagnosed with a rare type of tumor and discusses why she became involved in patient advocacy. “I couldn’t live with the fact that no one knew much about this insidious disease and that research dedicated to pancreatic cancer lagged so far behind other major cancers,” she writes.

New Stanford-developed sweat test may aid in development of cystic fibrosis treatments: This blog entry discusses a development that could someday lead to more targeted treatment for cystic fibrosis, a recessive genetic disorder that affects the lungs and digestive system.

A physician shares his story of being diagnosed with amyloidosis: In a recent video, Kevin Anderson, MD, shares his story of working with Ron Witteles, MD, co-director of the Stanford Amyloid Center, to receive a heart transplant and get his health back on track after receiving a diagnosis of amyloidosis.

Stanford-developed device shown to reduce the size of existing scars in clinical trial: A device invented by School of Medicine researchers has demonstrated in a small clinical trial that it can help decrease the size of existing scars when used after scar-revision surgery.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

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