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Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of November 3

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of November 3

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

Can Joe Six-Pack compete with Sid Cyborg?: UC-Berkeley philosopher John Searle, PhD, and Stanford artificial-intelligence expert Terry Winograd, PhD, recently got together to explore the question: “Can a computer have a mind?”

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Breaking Good: How to wipe out meth labs: Earlier this week, addiction expert Keith Humphreys, PhD, testified about methamphetamine laboratories to West Virginia Governor Earl Ray Tomblin’s Advisory Council on Substance Abuse. He shares his idea on how to solve the problem here.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of October 27

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Ask Stanford Med: Expert in reproductive medicine responds to questions on infertilityValerie Baker, MD, the division chief of reproductive endocrinology and infertility and director of Stanford’s Program for Primary Ovarian Insufficiency, responds to questions on infertility research and treatments in this edition of Ask Stanford Med.

The disturbing trend of science by press releaseKeith Humphreys, PhD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses the dangers of putting the press release before peer review in scientific research. His piece was written in response to a recent unpublished study suggesting that Oreo cookies are as addictive as cocaine.

BBC study: Oh, what a difference an hour of sleep makes: A small study initiated by the BBC and conducted at the University of Surrey’s Sleep Research Centre examined outcomes at the genetic level in participants who got six-and-a-half or seven-and-a-half hours of sleep a night.

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

On the hunt for ancient DNA, Stanford researchers improve the odds: A paper by Carlos Bustamante, PhD, professor of genetics, Meredith Carpenter, PhD, a postdoctoral research fellow in genetics, and colleagues describes a novel method that can greatly enrich the yield of DNA from ancient samples.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of October 20

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Stanford study shows importance of parents talking directly to their toddler: Children born to higher-income families tend to perform better in school than children from lower-income families. To find out why, a team of Stanford researchers led by Anne Fernald, PhD, studied toddlers from Spanish-speaking, low-income families. The findings of their study suggest that toddlers’ language skills are linked to how often caregivers talk directly to them.

Story highlights need to change the way we view and diagnose eating disorders in men: Many people think that eating disorders only affect women. Now, eating disorders, such as anorexia and binge eating, are increasingly being recognized in men. A story in the San Francisco Chronicle explores some common perceptions of eating disorders, and why we must realize that eating disorders can affect everyone.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of October 14

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD.  This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

After the cancer is gone, the real work starts: Inspire contributor Britta Aragon shares her experience being diagnosed with cancer at the age of 16 and discusses how her illness influenced the way she dealt with her father’s colon cancer years later. Her story highlights the need for programs that help cancer survivors cope and create life after cancer.

Newly identified protein helps explain how exercise boosts brain health: Scientists know that exercise is a healthy, drug-free way to bolster your brain’s health. But until recently, little was known about the mechanisms in the body that enable exercise to act on the brain. Now researchers from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute at Harvard have identified the pathway that translates exercise into proteins that boost brain development and help aid cognition.

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of October 6

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Stanford’s Thomas Südhof wins 2013 Nobel Prize in Medicine: Molecular neuroscientist Thomas Südhof, MD, was named a co-winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet said the award was for “discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells.”

Stanford’s Michael Levitt wins 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: As announced by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences on Wednesday, Michael Levitt, PhD, the Robert W. and Vivian K. Cahill Professor in Cancer Research, is a winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The award was given for “the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems.”

Stanford’s newest Nobel winner on the prize: It’s an “incredibly beautiful” honor: From a car in Spain, Thomas Südhof answered his phone last Monday to discover he had just won a Nobel.

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Science rapper “busts a move” to explain Nobel discovery: A student rap group led by Tom McFadden, a former teaching assistant for Stanford’s Program in Human Biology, explains how neurons in the brain communicate with one another across gaps called synapses in a video titled “Synaptic Cleft.” The song and dance breaks down the discovery made by Nobel winner Thomas Südhof.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of September 29

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains in a Huffington Post piece several ways in which inadequate sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being.

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a rapid thermal exchange device developed more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD, can dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance. A video demonstrates how the device works.

Found: Potential new way to predict some multiple-sclerosis patients’ disease course, drug response: Using cutting-edge technology to analyze autopsy samples from multiple sclerosis patients, researchers led by May Han, MD, have identified more than 2,000 proteins that were activated in MS lesions.

Oh, baby! Infertile woman gives birth through Stanford-developed technique: An infertile woman in Japan gave birth through in vitro activation, or IVA, a technique developed in the Stanford lab of Aaron Hsueh, PhD.

Designing the next generation of sleep devices: A New Scientist story (registration required) explains that new sleep devices could aid the sleep-deprived, help in treating mental-health conditions and even potentially extend our lifespan. The piece describes a prototype funded by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of September 22

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of September 22

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Communicating with terminally ill patients: A physician’s perspective: Written as a response to the piece by Inspire contributor Jessica Rice, thoracic oncologist Kavitha Jennifer Ramchandran, MD, shares her thoughts on the difficult and emotional conversations between physicians and their terminally ill patients.

Asking the hardest questions: Talking with doctors while terminally ill: In this moving piece, Inspire contributor Jessica Rice writes about her experience seeking information from doctors about her terminal illness. Rice was diagnosed with stage 4 metastatic lung cancer in 2011 at age 30.

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

New study: Genes may affect skin youthfulness: Though some genes have been linked to overall youthfulness, little is known about genes that may be be linked to youthful looking skin. Now a Stanford/Albert Einstein College of Medicine study of 1,000 Ashkenazi-Jewish adults has identified a suite of genes that may be associated with older skin that looks deceptively young.

Ask Stanford Med: Cheri Mah responds to questions on sleep and athletic performance: In our latest installment of Ask Stanford Med, Cheri Mah, with the Stanford Sleep Disorders Clinic and Research Laboratory, talks about her research and offers tips to help readers get the most out of their nightly slumber.

 

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of September 15

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains in a Huffington Post piece several ways inadequate sleep can negatively affect your well-being.

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a rapid thermal exchange device developed more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD, can dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance. A video demonstrates how the device works.

Important metabolic defect identified in immune cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients: In a study in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, Connie Weyand and Jorg Goronzy, both professors of medicine, and their colleagues have fingered a particular metabolic defect that appears to be specific to rheumatoid arthritis.

Asking the hardest questions: Talking with doctors while terminally ill: In this moving piece, Inspire contributor Jessica Rice writes about her experience seeking information from doctors about her terminal illness. Rice was diagnosed with stage 4 metastatic lung cancer in November, 2011 at age 30.

A prescription for reducing medical student stress: In an article in Academic Medicine, Charles Prober, MD, senior associate dean for medical education here, and Salman Khan, founder of Khan Academy, issue a “call to action” to bridge classroom and test content for Part I of the United States Medical Licensing Examination.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of September 8

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

NICU trauma intervention shown to benefit mothers of preemies: Researchers from Stanford and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital have developed an intervention technique that can help ease distress and depression among mothers of babies born prematurely. LPCH psychiatrist Richard Shaw, MD, is lead author of the study.

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: An October 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

A ban on baby-formula freebies: In July of 2012, Massachusetts hospitals collectively and voluntarily decided to stop distributing infant-formula gift bags in an effort to further promote breastfeeding, a Boston Globe article reported.

Ask Stanford Med: Cheri Mah taking questions on sleep and athletic performance: Cheri Mah, a researcher with the Stanford Sleep Disorders Clinic and Research Laboratory, is taking questions on sleep and athletic performance for this Ask Stanford Med segment.

Ask Stanford Med: Director of Female Sexual Medicine Program responds to questions on sexual health: In this installment of Ask Stanford Med, Leah Millheiser, MD, director of Stanford’s Female Sexual Medicine Program, addressed readers’ questions related to female sexual health. Topics include the relationship between body image and sex drive, treatments for low sex drive in women and possible effects of bicycling on female sexual health.

 

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of September 1

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of September 1

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Ask Stanford Med: Director of Female Sexual Medicine Program responds to questions on sexual health: In this installment of Ask Stanford Med, Leah Millheiser, MD, the director of Stanford’s Female Sexual Medicine Program, addresses your questions related to female sexual health. Topics include the relationship between body image and sex drive, treatments for low sex drive in women and possible effects of bicycling on female sexual health.

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: An October 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

A Q&A with breastfeeding expert Susan Crowe: In our most recent Q&A, Susan Crowe, MD, the director of outpatient breast feeding medicine services at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, answers several questions related to the benefits and challenges of breastfeeding.

Could gut bacteria play a role in mental health?: Many of us have experienced butterflies (or something less pleasant) in the pit of our stomach owing to stress or anxiety. But, as discussed in this recent article in The Verge, the link between our mental state and the bacteria in our gut could work both ways.

Researchers reverse pulmonary hypertension in rats by blocking inflammation-producing pathway: Until recently, the cause of pulmonary hypertension – dangerously high blood pressure in the lungs caused by narrowed pulmonary arteries – was unclear. Now, a Stanford-led study of pulmonary hypertension in rats suggests that an inflammation-producing pathway may be to blame.

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