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Applied Biotechnology, Health and Fitness, Stanford News

Fits like a glove: Stanford researchers develop medical applications for the Cooling Glove

Fits like a glove: Stanford researchers develop medical applications for the Cooling Glove

Weightlifting1-CoreControlTwo years ago we wrote about the Cooling Glove, a device developed by Stanford biologists Craig Heller, PhD, and Dennis Grahn that helps athletes cool off and recover from active play more easily. At the time, the Cooling Glove was being used by a few sports teams, especially Stanford football, but others included the San Francisco 49ers and Manchester United. This past July, the glove was used by the Germans in the FIFA World Cup soccer competition, where they handily beat the heavily favored Brazilian team on their home turf.

The device fits over an athlete’s hand and is connected to a cooler and a vacuum source. Grahn and Heller’s major insight was that the non-hairy skin of the palms, soles, and face are our major sites of heat dissipation. These areas have special blood vessels that can receive a large volume of blood and act as radiators, and the cooled blood from these surfaces flows back to the body’s core.

When asked about other applications for the glove, Heller rattles off half a dozen that his lab is looking into in quick succession. One includes building a prototype for military working dogs. If they’re in an extremely hot climate, they pant more, which compromises their ability to sniff and find the dangerous compounds they are searching for. A canine cooling device that keeps their body temperature cool can help their sniffers work more efficiently.

The team is also working on several medical applications. One variant aims to maintain patient’s temperature during surgery. In this application, booties can be used leaving the arms free for IV lines and other instrumentation. The researchers are also looking at how the Cooling Glove can help menopausal women manage their hot flashes. Heller will soon begin enrolling volunteers for this trial. Another application involves using the glove in its heating mode to stave off migraine headaches before they become full-blown.

The U.S. Department of Energy is interested in how personal heating and cooling devices could be used as an alternative to heating and cooling whole buildings or rooms. The glove or bootie technology could mean a broader dead band on thermostats – the temperature range within which neither the cooling or heating system needs to be turned on – thus saving lots of energy.

Despite the recent success at the World Cup, Heller says the Cooling Glove has not been as popular with athletes as it could be. He notes that Avacore, the company marketing the glove commercially, is relatively small and doesn’t have a large enough budget to develop a more streamlined and user-friendly version or market it widely. He says that the device’s novelty also slows down acceptance:

If you have a concept that doesn’t fit existing ideas, breaking into a market is difficult. We had to overcome skepticism that we were selling snake oil. We overcome that with research, but getting basic research translated and disseminated for the user community is not easy.

One finding of the research is that use of the glove in a conditioning program produces impressive results – beyond what is produced by performance enhancing substances, such as steroids. In a study involving students, some freshmen women – not varsity athletes – were did more than 800 pushups in less than 45 minutes. Some professional athletes tripled their capacities in particular routines such as dips or pullups in 5-6 weeks.

Heller is optimistic about the Cooling Glove’s future in sports. “I expect it will be adopted eventually. If, for no other reason, safety – in sports and many other endeavors such as emergency response.”

Heller is a founder of Avacore, but no longer affiliated with the company.

Previous: Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance
Photo courtesy of Avacore

Health and Fitness, Nutrition

Eat well, be well and enjoy (a little) candy

Eat well, be well and enjoy (a little) candy

260823789_3eda4b0439_oAs Halloween treats fill cupboards, jack-’o-lanterns and workplace counters, I bet you’re hunting for a middle ground between candy glutton and candy curmudgeon. Anticipating this tricky balance, Stanford dieticians Rosalyne Tu, MS, RD and Raymond Palko, MS, RD, offered some healthy eating tips in this BeWell@Stanford feature:

What are some common pitfalls during the holidays that can contribute to weight gain?

RP: Often, the concept of “moderation” can undermine our good intentions. Moderate eating does not mean consuming two pieces of pumpkin pie instead of three. Rather, it means having a small slice of pie, one or two times over the course of a week.

RT: Sometimes we are too “good” about budgeting our calories and we skip meals or under-eat during the day to save up calories for large holiday meals. This strategy can backfire on us because our appetite hormones get very strong and we end up in less control of our appetites, causing us to overeat later. Our bodies were designed to treat starvation as our worst enemy; therefore, when we are hungry, we naturally crave highly caloric foods (high sugar and fat). For some people, giving in to these foods brings on feelings of guilt when the biological response was natural.

RP: Increased alcohol consumption is another road bump. At parties, alcohol can flow freely, and it is very calorically dense without any nutritional benefits.

RT: Liquid calories are often empty calories. Alcohol, specifically, can promote overeating because of its ability to break down willpower while causing blood sugars to drop — both of which could encourage overeating.

But it’s still possible to enjoy your favorite treats, the two dieticians said:

RT: Food is meant to be enjoyed! Give yourself permission to enjoy your favorite treat and practice eating mindfully. Eat your treat like it is a fine dining experience: slow down, savor every morsel, and minimize the distractions like the television and computer. Eating mindfully helps your body decide how much it is truly hungry for.

Previously: When it comes to weight loss, maintaining a diet is more important than diet type, Where is the love? A discussion of nutrition, health and repairing our relationship with food and How to avoid a candy-coated Halloween
Photo by Juushika Redgrave

Ask Stanford Med, Health and Fitness

Director of Stanford Runner’s Injury Clinic discusses treating and preventing common injuries

Director of Stanford Runner's Injury Clinic discusses treating and preventing common injuries

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It may surprise you to learn that past studies show that runners have a 50 percent chance of sustaining an injury that disrupts their training, and those that compete in marathons have an incidence rate as high as 90 percent. But don’t hang up your sneakers just yet. Many common aches and pains that nag runners can easily be treated or avoided.

On Thursday, Michael Fredericson, MD, who is director of the Stanford Runner’s Injury Clinic and has been head team physician with the Stanford Sports Medicine Program since 1992, will talk about the latest running prevention and treatment methods during a Stanford Health Library lecture. (For those unable to attend the event in person, you can watch the live webcast starting at 7 PM Pacifiic time.) To kick off the conversation, I reached out to Fredericson to discuss some of the topics of his upcoming talk, including the harms of overstriding, the benefits of cross-training, and remedies for prevalent joint problems. He and Adam Tenforde, MD, a sports medicine fellow at Stanford, responded to my questions.

How can overstriding lead to injury?

The term “overstriding” refers to running with the foot striking the ground too far forward from normal stride length. This results in heel strike pattern that may increase stress in the hip and knee joints. Research has shown that forefoot strike patterns tend to reduce stress on the knees and hips, although this may lead to greater stress on the foot and ankle. We conduct a clinic called RunSafe, where we evaluate gait of runners using video and markers. More efficient stride frequency is 90 strides per leg per minute. When a runner overstrides, this may result in a lower stride rate and an inefficient gait. We evaluate for the causes of overstriding, including poor hip extensor strength (weak gluteal muscles), decreased flexibility and technique and encourage correction of these biomechanical contributors. Also, we may suggest shoes with reduced weight, such as ‘minimalist shoes’ as these tend to encourage a runner to run with a more mid-foot strike pattern. However, we caution any changes in shoe type or technique be introduced gradually to decrease risk of developing an injury from changes in gait pattern that stress the body in a new way.

Why is it important for runners to cross-train?

Cross-training refers to forms of aerobic exercise that do not involve running. Doing exercises that do not involve the repetitive ground-impact experienced during running help to rest tired muscles and decrease stress on bones, assisting in recovery while building aerobic capacity. There are no established forms of cross-training to prevent injuries, but performing exercises that do not involve impact loading through the legs, such as elliptical trainer, cycling or deep water running may be helpful.

Many runners select shoes that compensate for how their foot pronates. But recent research shows that pronating too much or too little may not actually increase a runner’s risk of injury. How important is pronation and foot type in preventing injuries?

We evaluate foot type and pronation during our RunSafe clinics. Pronation is a normal motion that helps to distribute forces while landing through the foot and ankle, reducing stresses through the lower extremities. If the foot abruptly stops moving from too much or too little pronation, the other joints and lower limbs may absorb these forces and can become injured. Foot type (having too high an arch or too flat a foot) may also result in higher forces in the legs and joints through associated biomechanics. Foot type and concerns of pronation need to be put into context of prior injury history, as recent research has suggested that foot type and pronation do not necessarily predict future injury risk.

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Aging, Health and Fitness, History, Neuroscience

Walking and aging: A historical perspective

Walk on by_flickrThe evidence that exercise helps stave off mental decline in elderly people has been mounting for several years now, but an article by Wayne Curtis in The Atlantic today puts this research in perspective by looking back a century at Edward Payson Weston’s walk from San Francisco to New York in 1909, when Weston was 70.

Curtis notes that the field of gerontology, the study of aging, had been around for less than a decade at that point. Most scientists thought brain cells were not capable of regenerating – something we know today that they’re most definitely capable of – and doctors were of the mind that too-vigorous exercise could harm mental acuity. Popular reaction to Weston’s trek is documented through newspaper accounts of the day:

A column in the Dallas Morning News admitted that many considered Weston’s walk from ocean to ocean “foolishness” and “an idle waste of time.” But, the writer asked, was it “preferred to the needless senility into which far too many men begin to drift at the period of three score years and 10?”

Curtis eventually moves into recent decades and details some of the recent research into how moderate to vigorous walking can actually improve mental acuity in several populations, including Alzheimer’s patients:

The results [of one long-term study], published in the journal Neurology, were sweeping and conclusive: Those who walked the most cut in half their risk of developing memory problems. The optimal exercise for cognitive health benefits, the 
researchers concluded, was to walk six to nine miles each week. That’s a mile to a mile and a half a day, without walking on Sundays if you’re inclined to follow Weston’s example of resting on the Sabbath. (This study concluded that walking an additional mile didn’t help all that much.)

I have to admit I’m glad I live in this century and not in Weston’s time. I don’t think I have the fortitude he showed in bucking popular opinion – or, to be honest, in walking.

Previously: Even old brains can stay healthy, says Stanford neurologistExercise and your brain: Stanford research highlighted on NIH Director’s blog and The state of Alzheimer’s research: A conversation with Stanford neurologist Michael Greicius
Photo by  Stefano Corso

Health and Fitness, Nutrition, Pediatrics, Public Health

Pediatrics group issues new recommendations for building strong bones in kids

Pediatrics group issues new recommendations for building strong bones in kids

MilkshelfOur bones function as retirement-savings accounts for calcium: We deposit the mineral into our bones when we’re young, then draw on the stores as we age. Too little calcium in the “savings account” puts people at risk for osteoporosis and debilitating bone fractures later in life.

This means that, although osteoporosis is usually seen as a disease of old age, pediatricians and parents need to pay attention to bone health. This week, the American Academy of Pediatrics released updated guidelines for pediatricians on how nutrition and exercise can improve bone density in their patients. The guidelines were co-authored by Stanford’s Neville Golden, MD, who is also an adolescent medicine specialist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. The report discusses calcium, which strengthens bones; vitamin D, which helps the body absorb calcium; and weight-bearing exercise, which promotes calcium deposition into the bones.

In addition to protecting against fractures in old age, the guidelines address the needs of kids whose bones are weakened by a variety of childhood and adolescent medical conditions, including juvenile osteoporosis, cystic fibrosis, lupus, celiac disease, cerebral palsy and anorexia nervosa.

A few highlights from the recommendations:

  • Children and adolescents should get their calcium mostly from food, not supplements. To meet calcium requirements, the committee recommends three or four daily servings of dairy foods (depending on the child’s age) and also suggests alternative food sources such as dark green veggies, beans, and calcium-fortified orange juice or breakfast cereals.
  • Vitamin D recommendations went up in 2011; the AAP agrees with the increased recommendations for all children and notes that kids using certain medications have even higher requirements than healthy children. Although the body can make vitamin D from sunlight, the report notes that kids are spending more time indoors and that sunscreen prevents vitamin D synthesis, making children more reliant on food and supplements to get enough vitamin D.
  • Soda often displaces milk in children’s diets, adding bone health to the list of reasons doctors should discourage soda consumption.
  • Weight-bearing exercise helps strengthen the bones. The report recommends activities such as walking, jogging, jumping and dancing over exercises such as swimming and cycling for building bone health.
  • Adolescent girls with eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and the female athlete triad experience bone loss. In the past, some physicians have suggested that these young women could improve their bone density by taking oral contraceptives, but the report notes that randomized controlled trials have not found any evidence that oral contraceptives increase bone mass for these patients.

Previously: Goo inside bones provides structural support, study finds, New genetic regions associated with osteoporosis and bone fracture and Avoiding sun exposure may lead to vitamin D deficiency in Caucasians
Photo by Stephanie Booth

Cancer, Health and Fitness, Research

Exercise may boost effectiveness of chemotherapy

Exercise may boost effectiveness of chemotherapy

running_092214Staying physically active during chemotherapy treatment can benefit patients’ physical and mental health. But findings from an animal study show that exercising may also help reduce the size of tumors.

As reported by Futurity, University of Pennsylvania researcher Joseph Libonati, PhD, and colleagues originally set out to test whether adding a fitness regimen to chemotherapy would offset cardiac damage related to the drug doxorubicin. While the team failed to find any significant evidence that exercise provided protection against negative cardiac side-effects, they did find that mice that exercised while receiving chemotherapy had notably smaller tumors than those that had chemotherapy alone. From the article:

Further studies will investigate exactly how exercise enhances the effect of doxorubicin, but the researchers believe it could be in part because exercise increases blood flow to the tumor, bringing with it more of the drug in the bloodstream.

“If exercise helps in this way, you could potentially use a smaller dose of the drug and get fewer side effects,” Libonati says. Gaining a clearer understanding of the many ways that exercise affects various systems of the body could also pave the way for developing drugs that mimic the effects of exercise.

“People don’t take a drug and then sit down all day,” he says. “Something as simple as moving affects how drugs are metabolized. We’re only just beginning to understand the complexities.”

Previously: Stanford preventive-medicine expert: Lay off the meat, get out the sneaks, From leukemia survivor to top junior golfer, Examining exercise and cancer survivorship and Study shows benefits of exercise for patients with chronic health conditions
Photo by MilitaryHealth

Aging, Health and Fitness, Public Health, Research

Twenty-four percent of middle-aged and older Americans meet muscle-strengthening guidelines

Twenty-four percent of middle-aged and older Americans meet muscle-strengthening guidelines

free_weightsPast research has shown that strength training can benefit older adults’ health in numerous ways including arthritis relief, alleviating back pain, increasing bone density, improving sleep and boosting mental health. But despite these findings, a new study from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found that few U.S. adults age 45 and older adhere to the Department of Health and Human Services’ muscle-strengthening recommendations.

The guidelines advise middle-aged and older adults to do moderate or high intensity muscle-strengthening activities that involve all major muscle group two or more days a week. Training can involve hand weights or weight machines, basic exercises such as sit-ups and push-ups or yoga and similar fitness practices.

In the latest study, researchers examined data from a telephone health survey conducted in 2011 by the CDC known as the U.S. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. For the survey, respondents provided information about the types of physical activities they engage in and frequency, as well as answered questions about if they specifically did exercises to strengthen their muscles. HealthDay reports:

Of all those who answered the questions on muscle strengthening, about 24 percent said they met the government’s recommendations.

Among those less likely than others to meet these guidelines were women, widows, those age 85 or older, people who were obese, and Hispanics. Participants who didn’t graduate from high school were also less likely to meet U.S. strength-training recommendations.

Jesse Vezina, of Arizona State University, and his fellow researchers concluded that interventions designed to encourage people to participate in strength training should target these high-risk groups.

Previously: Moderate exercise program for older adults reduces mobility disability, study shows, Help from a virtual friend goes a long way in boosting older adults’ physical activity and Do muscles retain memory of their former fitness?
Photo by Positively Fit

Big data, Chronic Disease, Clinical Trials, Health and Fitness, Public Health

Stanford to launch Wellness Living Laboratory

Stanford to launch Wellness Living Laboratory

1200px-Female_joggers_on_foggy_Morro_Strand_State_BeachIf you’re the kind of person who wears a heart monitor while jogging, tracks your sleep with an app or meditates to lengthen your lifespan, then a new Stanford project, called WELL, just might be for you.

WELL, which stands for the Wellness Living Laboratory hasn’t started quite yet — it will launch in 2015 — but when it does, it will unleash a variety of cutting-edge tools in an effort to define health.

Health seems like a no-brainer, but it is more than the absence of disease, says John Ioannidis , MD, DSc, the head of the Stanford Prevention Research Center. Ioannidis wants to find out how people can be “more healthy than healthy.”

To do that, he secured $10 million and laid out plans for the project. WELL plans to enroll thousands of volunteers — who Ioannidis calls “citizen scientists” — in two initial locations: Santa Clara County, Calif., and China, with plans to expand to other sites in the future.

Participants may be able to select which health factors to track and to report much of their information remotely and digitally, although some in-person visits may be required. Participants will also have the opportunity to enroll in a variety of clinical trials to test various interventions, such as nutrition counseling or smoking cessation programs.

The program will focus on wellness, rather than diseases, with the hypothesis that promoting wellness thwarts diseases, Ioannidis said.

Volunteers who would rather not provide health information will also have the opportunity to benefit from access to a program-wide social networking effort that will spread news of successful practices, he said. “This outer sphere could reach out to tens of millions of people,” Ioannidis told me.  Stay tuned to learn how to sign up.

The $10 million came as an unrestricted gift to Stanford University from Amway’s Nutrilite Health Institute Wellness Fund.

Previously: Medicine X explores the relationship between mental and physical health, Stanford partnering with Google [x] and Duke to better understand the human body, New Stanford center aims to promote research excellence and Teens these days smoking less but engaging in other risky behaviors
Photo by: Mike Baird

Autoimmune Disease, Chronic Disease, Health and Fitness, Research, Technology

Video game accessory may help multiple sclerosis patients reduce falls, boost brain connections

Wii_balance_boardNintendo’s Wii Balance Board has helped get people off the couch and moving as they play aerobic video games like Super Hula Hoop or Dance Dance Revolution. Now a study published this week in Radiology shows that the video game console’s balance board may help reduce multiple sclerosis (MS) patients’ risk of falls by rewiring their brains.

In a small study, researchers used an MRI technique called diffusion tensor imaging to analyze changes in the brain of MS patients that used the Wii Balance Board while playing video games for 30-40 minutes a day five days a week.

According to a recent Forbes post:

MRI scans in the MS patients in the study demonstrated significant growth of nerve tracts which are integral in movement as well as balance. It turns out that the changes seen on MRI correlated with improvements in balance as measured by an assessment technique called posturography.

These brain changes in MS patients are likely a manifestation of neural plasticity, or the ability of the brain to adapt and form new connections throughout life, said lead author Luca Prosperini, M.D., Ph.D., from Sapienza University in Rome, Italy.

”The most important finding in this study is that a task-oriented and repetitive training aimed at managing a specific symptom is highly effective and induces brain plasticity.”

“More specifically, the improvements promoted by the Wii balance board can reduce the risk of accidental falls in patients with MS, thereby reducing the risk of fall-related comorbidities like trauma and fractures,”

 added Prosperini.

Researchers cautioned that the improvements in balance did not persist after patients stopped playing the video games, suggesting that patients will need to continue their training in order benefit from the intervention.

Previously: Study analyzes video game-related injuries and Comparing the Wii Fit board to a clinical force platform
Photo by Joachim S. Müller

Aging, Complementary Medicine, Health and Fitness, Mental Health, Neuroscience, Research

Mindfulness training may ease depression and improve sleep for both caregivers and patients

Mindfulness training may ease depression and improve sleep for both caregivers and patients

meditatingDepression and poor sleep often affect both dementia patients and their caregivers. Now new research shows that caregivers and patients who undergo mindfulness training together experience an improvement in mood, sleep and overall quality of life.

While past studies have shown that yoga and simple meditations can relieve caregivers’ stress, researchers at Northwestern University wanted to determine if patients and caregivers could be trained together.

In the small study (subscription required), pairs of patients and caregiver participated in an eight-week mindfulness program. Patients were diagnosed with dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease or mild cognitive impairment, often a precursor to dementia. Caregivers included spouses, adult children or other relatives. The training was designed specifically to meet the needs of  individuals with memory loss due to terminal neurodegenerative illness and their caregivers. Researchers evaluated participants within two weeks of starting the program and two weeks of completing it.  Lead author Ken Paller, PhD, explained the results in a release:

We saw lower depression scores and improved ratings on sleep quality and quality of life for both groups… After eight sessions of this training we observed a positive difference in their lives.

Mindfulness involves attentive awareness with acceptance for events in the present moment… You don’t have to be drawn into wishing things were different. Mindfulness training in this way takes advantage of people’s abilities rather than focusing on their difficulties

Since caregivers often have limited personal time, mindfulness programs that accommodate them as well as patients could be an effective approach to helping both groups regularly attend sessions, said researchers.

The findings were published Monday in the American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias.

Previously: Regularly practicing hatha yoga may improve brain function for older adults, Study suggests yoga may help caregivers of dementia patients manage stress and How mindfulness-based therapies can improve attention and health
Photo by Alex

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