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Imaging, In the News, NIH, Pregnancy, Research, Women's Health

NIH puts focus on the placenta, the “fascinating” and “least understood” organ

NIH puts focus on the placenta, the "fascinating" and "least understood" organ

ultrasoundLast week, the NIH announced its support for an initiative to study how new technologies can shed light on the placenta’s function and health during pregnancy. Considering how crucial the placenta is to not only the health of a woman and her fetus during pregnancy, but also to the lifelong health of both, it’s surprising to hear the NIH call it “the least understood human organ.”

Currently, doctors and scientists can only gather information about the placenta by using ultrasounds and blood tests, and by examining it after delivery. What if new sensors could track how well blood, oxygen, and nutrients are flowing to the fetus, or if new imaging technologies could assess how well the placenta is attaching to the uterine wall? What if biotechnology could assess the effects of environmental factors on the placenta, such as air pollution, maternal diet, and medications?

Better understanding and monitoring of this temporary organ promises to improve maternal and child health. Placental issues can contribute to negative pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, preterm birth, and stillbirth, and they’ve also been linked to a higher risk of heart disease later in life, for both mother and child.

This is the third and largest funding announcement for the NIH’s Human Placenta Project, led by the NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and cosponsored by the NIH’s National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

Calling the placenta a “fascinating organ” and the “lifeline that gives us our start in the world” Alan E. Guttmacher, MD, director of the NICHHD, also said in an NIH press release:

We hope this funding opportunity will attract a broad range of researchers and clinicians to help — placental biologists, obstetricians, and experts in imaging, bioengineering, and other arenas… For researchers who want to apply their skills in an area of medicine that isn’t being looked at as much as both scientific opportunity and human health warrant, this is a wonderful chance.

Previously: Placenta, the video game, The placenta sacrifices itself to keep baby healthy in case of starvation and Program focuses on the treatment of placental disorders
Related: Too deeply attached and A most mysterious organ
Photo by thinkpanama

Behavioral Science, In the News, Patient Care, Research, Sleep, Stanford News

Watson, the narcoleptic Chihuahua, demonstrates symptoms on-air

Watson, the narcoleptic Chihuahua, demonstrates symptoms on-air

Watson - 560

What’s black and white (with just a few splotches of brown), understands French, and falls asleep at feeding times? A narcoleptic Chihuahua named Watson.

Watson’s becoming accustomed to the spotlight — he made his debut here at Scope, then went on to star in a KQED blog post. But today, Watson made it on air for The California Report. The segment begins – endearingly — with Emmanuel Mignot, MD, PhD, cooing to Watson in French. Mignot is Watson’s human and a sleep researcher known for the discovery of the gene that causes narcolepsy in dogs. (He also directs the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine).

Although Watson isn’t officially a Stanford dog — he’s Mignot’s pet — Mignot is hoping to use the slightly shy pup to help some of his patients, particularly children, who suffer from narcolepsy.

One of the symptoms of narcolepsy is cataplexy, a sudden loss of muscle control and Watson often suffers these attacks when he’s excited or spots tasty food.

“He looks at you with these eye half-closed and its almost like he’s just telling you, “Oh, I love you,” but in fact its because he’s having a sleep attack,” Mignot said.

Previously: Narcoleptic Chihuahua joins Stanford sleep researcher’s family, Stumbling upon circadian rhythms and Does influenza trigger narcolepsy?
Photo by Emmanuel Mignot

Cardiovascular Medicine, In the News, Public Health, Research, Women's Health

A look at why young women who have heart attacks delay seeking care

A look at why young women who have heart attacks delay seeking care

317916781_c8bb9b352e_zHeart attacks kill more than 15,000 women in the U.S. each year and are disproportionately deadly for females under the age of 55. Although several studies, including those by Stanford cardiologist Jennifer Tremmel, MD, have investigated the signs and consequences of heart attacks in men and women, relatively little is known about heart disease in women or why it’s so lethal for young females. And according to new research, misconceptions about the risk factors and signs of coronary heart disease may be why young females are less likely to recognize and seek emergency care for a heart attack.

In the study, published yesterday in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, a research team led by Judith Lichtman, PhD, MPH, of the Yale School of Public Health, interviewed 30 women between the ages of 30 to 55  who had been hospitalized for a heart attack. The researchers identified five common themes among the symptoms and treatments of the women they interviewed, and one potentially important finding was that women were unsure they’d had a heart attack so they were hesitant to seek medical treatment.

From an NPR story:

A heart attack doesn’t necessarily feel like a sudden painful episode that ends in collapse, [Lichtman] notes. And women are more likely than men to experience vague symptoms like nausea or pain down their arms.

“Women may experience a combination of things they don’t always associate with a heart attack,” Lichtman says. “Maybe we need to do a better job of explaining and describing to the public what a heart attack looks and feels like.”

Tremmel also provided comment on the study, saying it indicates a need to encourage women to seek help for medical concerns. “This is an ongoing issue in the medical field,” she said. “…We all have to empower women patients, so they know that they need to not be so worried about going to the hospital if they’re afraid there’s something wrong.”

Previously: New test could lead to increase of women diagnosed with heart attack, Heart attacks and chest pain: Understanding the signs in young womenAsk Stanford Med: Cardiologist Jennifer Tremmel responds to questions on women’s heart healthPaper highlights major differences in disease between men and women and Gap exists in women’s knowledge of heart disease
Photo by Simon Mason

Immunology, In the News, Nutrition, Pediatrics, Research

Peanut products and babies: Now okay?

Peanut products and babies: Now okay?

peanut butter2 - big

Updated 2-25-15: Allergy expert Sharon Chinthrajah, MD, discussed the study and its implications on KQED’s Forum today:

***

2-24-15: Any parent of young children is likely familiar with the warnings: It’s not okay to give your baby peanut butter, or any other peanut product, before he or she turns one. Don’t do it! These instructions are so imprinted on my brain that I practically did a double-take when I came across headlines about new research suggesting that infants should, indeed, be fed peanut products – in order to prevent the development of peanut allergies.

This isn’t the first time that the benefits of giving allergenic foods to babies have been outlined, but the language surrounding this study has been particularly strong. As the writer of a New York Times blog entry explained, the authors of the study and accompanying editorial “called the results ‘so compelling’ and the rise of peanut allergies ‘so alarming’ that guidelines for how to feed infants at risk of peanut allergies should be revised soon.” He went on to outline the study findings:

In the study, conducted in London, infants 4 to 11 months old who were deemed at high risk of developing a peanut allergy were randomly assigned either to be regularly fed food that contained peanuts or to be denied such food. These feeding patterns continued until the children were 5 years old. Those who consumed the foods that had peanuts in them were far less likely to be allergic to peanuts when they turned 5.

After hearing the news, I reached out to the folks at the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy Research at Stanford to get their take on the findings. Sharon Chinthrajah, MD, a clinical assistant professor of medicine, explained that this work is the first randomized controlled study to look at how to prevent peanut allergies. She told me:

We’ve all been waiting for the results of this landmark study to confirm the shift in the paradigm of when to introduce foods into the diet. Early introduction of peanut in the right infants can prevent peanut allergy. Dr. [Gideon Lack, the leader of the study] and colleagues were able to show an 80 percent reduction in peanut allergy in children who started eating peanut early and incorporated it into their regular diet.

Chinthrajah believes the guidelines on babies and peanut products should be revised, “because peanut allergies affect 2 percent of our population in the U.S. and most people do not outgrow this allergy.” But, as other experts have done, she cautions that not everyone should introduce peanuts and other foods into their diet early. “Those who are ‘high-risk’ – who have other allergic conditions such as eczema or other food allergies – should consult with their allergist to see if it would be safe to introduce peanut into their child’s diet,” she advised.

Previously: Taking a bite out of food allergies: Stanford doctors exploring new way to help sufferers, Simultaneous treatment for several food allergies passes safety hurdle, Stanford team shows, Researchers show how DNA-based test could keep peanut allergy at bay, A mom’s perspective on a food allergy trial and Searching for a cure for pediatric food allergies
Photo by Anna

Genetics, In the News, LGBT, Medicine and Society, Research, Sexual Health

Sex biology redefined: Genes don’t indicate binary sexes

Sex biology redefined: Genes don't indicate binary sexes

14614853884_3d6d1d662a_zImagine being a forty-six-year-old woman pregnant with her third child, whose amniocentesis follow-up shows that half her cells carry male chromosomes. Or a seventy-year-old father of three who learns during a hernia repair that he has a uterus. A recent news feature in Nature mentioned these cases as it elaborated on the spectrum of sex biology. People can be sexed in a non-straightforward way and not even be aware of it; in fact, most probably aren’t. As many as 1 person in 100 has some form of “DSD,” a difference/disorder of sex development.

The simple scenario many of us learned in school is that two X chromosomes make someone female, and an X and a Y chromosome make someone male. These are simplistic ways of thinking about what is scientifically very complex. Anatomy, hormones, cells, and chromosomes (not to mention personal identity convictions) are actually not usually aligned with one binary classification.

The Nature feature collects research that has changed the way biologists understand sex. New technologies in DNA sequencing and cell biology are revealing that chromosomal sex is a process, not an assignation.

As quoted in the article, Eric Vilain, MD, PhD, director of the Center for Gender-Based Biology at UCLA, explains that sex determination is a contest between two opposing networks of gene activity. Changes in the activity or amounts of molecules in the networks can sway the embryo towards or away from the sex seemingly spelled out by the chromosomes. “It has been, in a sense, a philosophical change in our way of looking at sex; that it’s a balance.”

What’s more, studies in mice are showing that the balance of sex manifestation can be shifted even after birth; in fact, it is something actively maintained during the mouse’s whole life.

According to the Nature feature, true intersex disorders, such as those from divergent genes or the inability of cellular receptors to respond to hormones, yield conflicting chromosomal and anatomical sex. But these are rare, about 1 in 4,500. For the 1/100 figure, they used a more inclusive definition of DSDs. More than 25 genes that affect sex development have now been identified, and they have a wide range of variations that affect people in subtle ways. Many differences aren’t even noticed until incidental medical encounters, such as in the opening scenarios (the first was probably caused by twin embryos fusing in the woman’s mother’s womb; the second by a hormonal disorder).

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Aging, Chronic Disease, In the News, Media, Neuroscience, Women's Health

Science Friday explores women’s heightened risk for Alzheimer’s

Science Friday explores women's heightened risk for Alzheimer's

More than two-thirds of the Americans living with Alzheimer’s are women — some like the character Alice in the movie “Still Alice,” who suffers from an early onset form of the disease.

Science Friday tackled that topic Friday, with guests Michael Greicius, MD, MPH, associate professor of neurology and director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders, and Roberta Diaz Brinton, PhD, professor of pharmacology at the University of Southern California. The two quickly disputed the belief that more women get Alzheimer’s disease because they live longer.

“The way women age puts them at risk,” Brinton said. As they transition through menopause, some women develop cognitive symptoms such as insomnia, depression and short-term memory loss, leaving them at greater risk for Alzheimer’s, she explained.

Women who have a form of a gene called APOE-e4 are particularly at risk, although it doesn’t seem to affect men, Greicius said. The gene interacts with estrogen.

Scientists are continuing to decipher the link between estrogen and Alzheimer’s and the possibility of hormone therapies, as well as the connection — if any — between pregnancy and Alzheimer’s risk, the scientists told listeners.

The 18-minute segment is available here.

Previously: Blocking a receptor on brain’s immune cells counters Alzheimer’s in mice, The state of Alzheimer’s research: A conversation with Stanford neurologist Michael Greicius, Having a copy of ApoE4 gene variant doubles Alzheimer’s risk for women but not for men and The toll of Alzheimer’s on caretakers

Cancer, Imaging, In the News, Research, Technology

Stanford instructor called out for his innovative – and beautiful – imaging work

Stanford instructor called out for his innovative - and beautiful - imaging work

breast cancer cells

I’ll skip the name word play – it’s just too obvious – but I won’t skip Michael Angelo’s work. Angelo, MD, a pathology instructor at Stanford, developed a new imaging technique that labels antibodies with metallic elements, then uses an ion beam to scan the tissue, revealing up to 100 proteins at once in a single cancer cell.

This technique, called multiplexed ion beam imaging, or MIBI, captured the attention of the National Institutes of Health, which featured Angelo in its NIH Director’s Blog this week. The images are lovely to look at, but also quite useful to learn more about tissue types.

Here’s Angelo describing the image above:

Angelo used MIBI to analyze a human breast tumor sample for nine proteins simultaneously—each protein stained with an antibody tagged with a metal reporter. Six of the nine proteins are illustrated here. The subpopulation of cells that are positive for three proteins often used to guide breast cancer treatment (estrogen receptor a, progesterone receptor, Ki-67) have yellow nuclei, while aqua marks the nuclei of another group of cells that’s positive for only two of the proteins (estrogen receptor a, progesterone receptor). In the membrane and cytoplasmic regions of the cell, red indicates actin, blue indicates vimentin, which is a protein associated with highly aggressive tumors, and the green is E-cadherin, which is expressed at lower levels in rapidly growing tumors than in less aggressive ones.

Taken together, such “multi-dimensional” information on the types and amounts of proteins in a patient’s tumor sample may give oncologists a clearer idea of how quickly that tumor is growing and which types of treatments may work best for that particular patient.  It also shows dramatically how much heterogeneity is present in a group of breast cancer cells that would have appeared identical by less sophisticated methods.

Angelo was given a NIH Director’s Early Independence Award last fall, and he’s ramping up his investigations of breast cancer.

Aging, Genetics, In the News, Mental Health, Neuroscience, Research, Women's Health

Are women at greater risk for Alzheimer’s? Stanford expert to discuss on today’s Science Friday

Are women at greater risk for Alzheimer’s? Stanford expert to discuss on today's Science Friday

2187905205_158290644d_zConfession: I named my parents’ cat (who died recently) Watson after listening to Ira Flatow interview James Watson, PhD, while driving cross country with my dad in 2000. Both before and after the all-critical cat-name-inspiring program, Science Friday has been a part of my Friday as often as I can squeeze it in.

So I was happy to hear that today’s program (which airs locally from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on KQED) will feature Stanford’s Michael Greicius, MD, MPH. He’ll be talking about Alzheimer’s disease and why the disease affects men and women differently.

Greicius, medical director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders, has worked with the gene variant known as ApoE4 – the largest single genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s, particularly for women. Last spring, he published a study showing that healthy ApoE4-positive women were twice as likely to contract the disease as their ApoE4-negative counterparts.

Greicius is expected to be on in the second hour, from 12 to 1 p.m. Pacific time.

Previously: Blocking a receptor on brain’s immune cells counters Alzheimer’s in mice, Examining the potential of creating new synapses in old or damaged brains, The state of Alzheimer’s research: A conversation with Stanford neurologist Michael Greicius and Having a copy of ApoE4 gene variant doubles Alzheimer’s risk for women but not for men
Photo by *Ann Gordon

CDC, Chronic Disease, Events, In the News, Patient Care, Research

Stanford expert to discuss systemic exertion intolerance disease (formerly chronic fatigue syndrome) during public call

Stanford expert to discuss systemic exertion intolerance disease (formerly chronic fatigue syndrome) during public call

telephone-158190_640Chronic fatigue syndrome is not only real, but it also has a new name: “systemic exertion intolerance disease” (SEID). The weeks-old name change was heralded by an Institute of Medicine report, which was reviewed by Stanford’s José Montoya, MD.

Montoya will discuss the disease, the name change, and some of Stanford’s work on SEID, in a “patient-centered” conference call sponsored by the CDC on Monday afternoon. He’ll be joined by the CDC’s Elizabeth Unger, PhD, MD, chief of the chronic viral diseases branch.

The public is welcome to join in, and listeners will be able to submit questions during the conference call, which begins at noon Pacific time.

More details, including the call-in number, can be found on the CDC’s website.

Previously: Chronic fatigue syndrome gets more respect (and a new name), Some headway on chronic fatigue syndrome: Brain abnormalities pinpointed, Unbroken: A chronic fatigue syndrome patient’s long road to recovery and Patients’ reaction to ME/CFS coverage in Stanford Medicine magazine
Photo by OpenClips

Chronic Disease, Health Policy, In the News, Pediatrics, Public Health, Sleep

Talking about teens’ “great sleep recession”

Talking about teens' "great sleep recession"

Sleepy Teen Student

We all understand, at some level, that sleep is critical to our health. But there’s a cultural undercurrent that belies that understanding: We tend to glorify the go-getters who can survive on four or five hours of sleep, lauding their productivity and drive. Numerous studies have shown that Americans of all ages – kids, teens, and adults – are not getting enough sleep.

More and more, researchers are warning that lack of sleep can damage our long-term health. Just yesterday, Rafael Pelayo, MD, with the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, was on KQED’s Forum radio program to discuss a new study looking at some alarming trends in teen sleep habits. The study, titled “The Great Sleep Recession” was published this week in the scientific journal Pediatrics. It showed that over the past 20 years, teens have been getting less sleep. Girls, minority teens, teens in urban areas and of low socioeconomic status were less likely to get at least seven hours of sleep than male, white teens. What’s more, minority teens and low SES teens were likely to report they thought they got enough sleep.

During the show, Pelayo spoke about our relationship with sleep and the challenges of sticking to a “sleep budget”:

When I read the title [of the study] it made me think of Bill Dement, who talks – at Stanford – about a sleep debt and not having enough total sleep. And a sleep debt has been growing and accumulating in people who have used sleep as something as optional in their lives. These students are… modeling after their parents, who are not getting enough sleep… But in the kids, it’s a particularly hard problem for them, they feel pressure to not get enough sleep.

Pelayo went on to say that parents and teens tend to prioritize other things, like homework, over sleep – but what they should be doing is setting aside a certain amount of time for sleep. “If the homework doesn’t get done, it doesn’t get done. They can’t make homework more important than sleep,” he said.

That last statement is a pretty radical suggestion, but if we are to avoid the fall-out from our bad sleep habits, radical changes may be the only solution.

Previously: With school bells ringing, parents should ensure their children are doing enough sleeping, Stanford docs discuss all things sleep, Study shows poor sleep habits as a teenager can “stack the deck against you for obesity later in life” and What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?
Photo by Alberto Vacarro

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