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Behavioral Science, In the News, Infectious Disease, Research, Stanford News

Irrational fear of contagion fuels xenophobia, Stanford study shows

Irrational fear of contagion fuels xenophobia, Stanford study shows

face-mask-98640_1280I have a very distinct memory of my grandfather dying from leukemia in an Iowa hospital. I peered in through a glass window, too scared to don the white mask and gown to visit him myself, even though the protections were for him, not me. Granted, I was eight. But fear of disease, and fear of those who have disease, makes perfect sense to me, even now.

But, that realization is tempered by knowledge of the harmful effects of irrational fear, the topic of a recent study by a team of Stanford researchers. As described in a recent Graduate School of Business story:

Throughout history, minority or “out” groups have been blamed for the spread of infectious disease. In medieval Europe, for instance, Jews and gypsies were among those accused of spreading the deadly bubonic plague. In 1793, during the yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia, local officials singled out actors, vaudevillians, and artists for transmitting the disease. But what is it about the fear of contagion that makes otherwise rational people buy into rumors about those they consider to be outsiders?

Organizational behavior researchers Hayagreeva Rao, PhD, and recent graduate Sunasir Dutta, PhD, developed an online pilot study where one group was told a new strain of flu had emerged, then asked about their views on immigration. The control group was simply asked about immigration.

Not surprisingly, the group told about the flu was less likely to support immigrant legalization. Dutta said he is convinced the results would be even more striking in the real world:

Practically speaking, the implications are clear: “Don’t do immigration reform during flu season,” says Rao.

The study also demonstrates the power of rumors to spur fear, even ethnic violence, Dutta said. And it illustrates the need for proactive, responsive communications, particularly in the beginning stage of epidemics when irrational fears can germinate.

Previously: Fear factor: Using virtual reality to overcome phobias, Fear of recurrence an issue for some cancer survivors and Looks of fear and disgust help us to see threats, study shows
Image by Openicons

Ethics, In the News, Medicine and Society, Science, Science Policy, Sports, Stanford News

Stanford expert celebrates decision stopping testosterone testing in women’s sports

Stanford expert celebrates decision stopping testosterone testing in women's sports

Female track and field athletes no longer need to have their natural testosterone levels below a certain threshold to compete in international events, the so-called “Supreme Court of sports”, the Court of Arbitration for Sport, ruled Monday.

Katrina Karkazis, PhD, a Stanford senior research scholar who was closely involved with the case, got the news on Friday, while she was in a San Francisco dog park. “What a day!” she said. “I was madly refreshing my email — I thought we were going to lose… I just started screaming and crying.”

Karkazis, who is an expert on ethics in sports and also gender, said she spent a year of her life working on the case.

She served as an advisor to 19-year-old sprinter Dutee Chand, who challenged the regulation that female athletes must have certain testosterone levels or undergo medical interventions to lower their testosterone to be allowed to compete against women in events governed by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), the international regulatory body of track and field.

The ruling suspends the IAAF’s testing regimen for two years, but Karkazis expects the decision will lead to permanent changes in women’s sports, including a reevalution by the International Olympic Committee.

“I’m thrilled,” Karkazis said. She said she was also surprised. “I didn’t think it was our time. I thought there were still too many entrenched ideas about testosterone being a ‘male hormone’ and it not belonging in women.”

Karkazis gained international attention after penning an op-ed in The New York Times in 2012 when the IAAF and the International Olympic Committee crafted a new policy banning women with naturally high levels of testosterone from competing.

“You can’t test for sex,” Karkazis said. “It’s impossible. There’s no one trait you can look at to classify people. There are many traits and there are always exceptions.”

She said that now women who have lived and competed their entire lives as women will be eligible to compete, a default policy she believes is sufficient to ensure a level playing field.

Previously: “Drastic, unnecessary and irreversible medical interventions” imposed upon some female athletes, Arguing against sex testing in athletes and Is the International Olympic Committee’s policy governing sex verification fair?
Photo by William Warby

Humor, In the News, Medical Education, Medicine and Literature, Medicine and Society, Patient Care

Graphic medicine takes flight

Empathy-Ian-Williams-510x438A recent blog post on Somatosphere sparked my interest in the role that comics can play in the study and delivery of health care, an emerging field called “graphic medicine.” The term was coined by UK-based Ian Williams, MD, who is an artist and independent humanities scholar as well as a physician. He recently launched a website of the same name.

The post introduces a few new books that just came out on the subject: Graphic Medicine Manifesto, a collaborative work by six health-care professionals and humanities scholars, and Ian Williams’ The Bad Doctor. It also describes how comics can open us up to new ways of seeing in ways that text alone cannot:

Comics allow us to ask how we can “orient” ourselves… toward the potentiality of images and away from the systematizing effects of text alone… [Comics use] images and imagistic thinking as a way to see a different mode of existence.

Since it’s an anthropology blog, it suggests that a “graphic medical anthropology” would be a great way to accomplish the anthropologist’s goal of “seeing structure, complexity, nuance, emergence, and multiplicity simultaneously.” We anthropologists often try to achieve this goal with complicated metaphors and theories, but perhaps the old adage about a picture being worth a thousand words holds true in this case.

The post notes that drawings can provide an experience of self-reflection for the artist, and can inspire readers to readily and easily respond with their own experience, making the work more of a dialog. They can introduce “theoretical orientations” in ways that are more accessible, and can expose power relations in ordinary lived experience. Ordinary lived experience is particularly well conveyed by comics; they showcase the mundane and make it meaningful. They can take those “ordinary, chronic and cruddy moments” and convey what it’s like to be part of our society.

Previously: Cancer Ninja fights patient misinformation, one cartoon at a time, Using graphic art to understand the emotional aspects of disease, A comic look at 12 medical specialties, Economist to explain health reform through graphic novel, and Webcomic xkcd gets medical
Illustration by Ian Williams, “Autography as Auto-Therapy: Psychic Pain and the Graphic Memoir.” Journal of Medical Humanities 2011, reposted from Somatosphere

Health Policy, In the News, Medicine and Society, Pediatrics, Stanford News

Stanford researchers analyze California’s new vaccine law

Stanford researchers analyze California's new vaccine law

CA vaccine photoWhat do California, West Virginia and Mississippi have in common? Stumped?

Thanks to a recent law signed by California Gov. Jerry Brown, these three states now have strict vaccine policies that require children to be vaccinated before entering school, unless they have a medical exemption. The new requirements eliminate religious and philosophical exemptions.

Stanford’s Michelle Mello, JD, PhD, and David Studdert, LLB, ScD, (along with co-author Wendy Parmet, JD) heralded the change in a New England Journal of Medicine commentary published this week. From a Stanford News release:

“The move represents a stunning victory for public health that affects not only California schoolchildren, but the prospects for strengthening vaccination requirements nationwide,” they wrote.

The new laws come in the wake of a measles outbreak that started at Disneyland last year. It fueled a nationwide debate about the merits of vaccines, and of the large number of children unvaccinated due to parental objections.

The new California law requires all children enrolled in private and public schools and day-care facilities to be vaccinated against measles, whooping cough and several other diseases.

Yet the law is sure to face challenges, particularly from opponents who say it violates their religious rights. In addition, a lack of enforcement may weaken the law’s ability to ensure widespread protection.

Nonetheless, California’s new law is worth celebrating, they say:

“Although California politics may be distinctive, its experience with SB277 teaches us that even strong opposition can be overcome with the right combination of astute public education, political strategy and legislative fortitude,” they wrote. “Fewer vaccination exemptions and vaccine-preventable illnesses would be accomplishments that other states would find difficult to ignore.”

Previously: A discussion of vaccines, “the single most life-saving innovation ever in the history of medicine”, Science Friday-style podcast explains work toward a universal flu vaccine and Side effects of childhood vaccines are extremely rare, new study finds
Image by Niyazz

Cardiovascular Medicine, Chronic Disease, In the News, Research, Stanford News, Transplants

Are donor hearts getting wasted?

Are donor hearts getting wasted?

heart choiceI wrote a press release recently on a study that showed a high percentage of donated hearts were not being used, raising concerns that some were getting wasted when they could be used to save lives. This made me curious about the process of just how a donor heart, which ideally has about a two-hour window before it gets transplanted to a patient with heart failure, gets matched.

The result is a Stanford Medicine magazine story titled “Heart Choices” that describes this process, the tough decisions that family members make when a loved one donates a heart, and the excruciating waiting that patients in need of a new heart go through.

Most importantly the article asks the question: Should more “high-risk” donor hearts be used? An estimated 20,000 people across the country are waiting for new hearts, and only a few thousand transplants happen on average per year. My story explains the dilemma:

The general assumption is that there simply are not enough donor hearts available to meet a growing demand. But new research is questioning that assumption. Some researchers and surgeons claim that thousands of donor hearts that could be used are turned away each year. The hearts are considered marginal because they come from older, sicker or riskier donors, but many argue they are safe for transplant, and could be saving lives.

“As patients wait longer, they often get sicker, and we often lose patients,” says Stanford cardiologist Kiran Khush, MD, whose research reports that 65 percent of available heart donations are discarded because of stringent acceptance criteria. Yet the criteria have not been critically evaluated, she says. “Increasing the supply of donor hearts is, of course, a great concern of mine.”

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In the News, Pediatrics, Public Health, Stanford News, Technology

Water-conscious hospital will debut in 2017 with expansion of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital

Water-conscious hospital will debut in 2017 with expansion of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital

hospital-expansion-exterior-stanford-childrensPlaces where people live and work tend to use a lot of water, and hospitals are no exception. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2012 report on water use in public buildings, hospitals rank third in water use just behind senior care facilities and hotels.

Now, the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford is working to buck this trend with a new expansion that will use the latest water and energy-saving techniques and tools. This 521,000 square foot addition, which will open in 2017, is predicted to use about 38 percent less water than a comparable hospital.

This sustainable approach to building design began long before the current drought situation in California made water conservation a top priority. “In 2008, when we started planning, we knew there was not enough rainfall to sustain even the most efficient hospital’s needs,” said Robin Guenther, lead designer of the expansion project, in a recent post on the Healthier, Happy Lives blog.

In the piece, Guenther and her team discuss some of the expansion’s energy saving features, including shade structures that reduce the building’s heat gain from the sun and moving the hospital’s data center to the roof where it can be cooled by a wind-powered ventilation system instead of by air conditioning. According to Guenther, these modifications will make the building’s thermal energy consumption about 60 percent less than the average hospital in Northern California.

“Sustainability is a guiding principle in everything we do,” Christopher G. Dawes, president and chief executive officer of the hospital, commented. “Everyone on our team shares in this commitment. It’s part of being a good neighbor and a member of the larger community, and ensuring we’re doing the best thing possible when it comes to preserving all of our environmental resources.”

Previously: Green roofs are not just good for the environment, they boost productivity, study shows and From the Stanford Medicine archives: A Q&A with actor Matt Damon on water and health
Image courtesy of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford

Autoimmune Disease, In the News, Mental Health, Pediatrics, Research, Stanford News

Stanford doctors unraveling mysterious childhood psychiatric disease

Stanford doctors unraveling mysterious childhood psychiatric disease

BrainModel2A story in Sunday’s Wall Street Journal highlights Stanford’s leadership in treating a mystifying disease in which a child suddenly develops intense psychiatric problems, often after an infection. The disease, called pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome, can be terribly disabling, altering kids’ personalities, interfering with their school work and making it hard for families to function.

As the story (subscription required) explains, some physicians question whether PANS is actually a separate disease from the psychiatric diagnoses it resembles, which include obsessive-compulsive disorder and anorexia nervosa. But doctors at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford suspect something else is truly going on, likely an autoimmune attack on the brain. The team, led by Jennifer Frankovich, MD, and Kiki Chang, MD, is working to learn more about the disease:

In an effort to establish the science of PANS, the Stanford clinic is collecting extensive data on the patients. Doctors try to piece together what is driving symptoms from pediatric records, parent reports, even teacher interviews. They are analyzing DNA samples from each patient and looking for clues in their immune systems. If they find strep, they bank the strain for further research. “It is easier to study something that is established,” Dr. Frankovich said. “To build something new is really hard.”

The team’s insights from 47 of their patients were published earlier this year in a special PANS-focused issue of the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, and the researchers are currently working to expand the capacity of their PANS clinic, the first of its kind in the country. More information about PANS and its effect on children and families is also available in a Stanford Medicine magazine story I wrote last year about Frankovich and Chang’s work.

Previously: What happens when the immune system attacks the brain? Stanford doctors investigate and My descent into madness — a conversation with author Susannah Cahalan
Photo by GreenFlames09

Health Policy, In the News, Medicine and Society

Medicare to pay for end-of-life conversations with patients

Medicare to pay for end-of-life conversations with patients

800px-Doctor_and_couple_talking_(1)Remember “death panels?” In the summer of 2009, in the midst of the debate about the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, a small item in the legislation allowing Medicare to reimburse physicians for end-of-life conversations with patients unleashed a tsunami of criticism. Opponents charged that so-called “death panels” – anonymous Washington bureaucrats – would be making decisions about rationing health care and ultimately deciding who would live and who would die. As foolish as that charge was, the Obama administration choose not to fight the opposition and the payment proposal was dropped.

Now, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has announced a new policy. Beginning January 1, 2016, the government will reimburse voluntary end-of-life conversations that Medicare physicians have with their patients.

We asked Stanford’s VJ Periyakoil, MD, a nationally recognized leader in palliative care, for comment, and she said, “Medicare’s proposal to reimburse doctors to have a conversation with the patient about their values and preferences for care is a quantum leap forward towards the lofty goal of improving quality of care for all Americans at the end-of-life.” But she emphasized that this is just one part of the solution:

Advance care planning is not an event but a process. The key is having conversations in plural, over time as patients’ goals of care change as their illness progresses.

Early in the illness, most patients prefer to have a trial of high-intensity treatments including life support, and this is a very reasonable thing to do. However, there is a tipping point in the illness trajectory where we go from prolonging life with quality to prolonging the dying process. Beyond this tipping point, most patients, if given a choice, prefer to die gently and naturally at home minimizing the burden to their loved ones. But in order for this to happen, we need doctors who are well trained and highly skilled at conducting end-of-life conversations with their patients. We need to ensure that patients and their proxy decision makers are well supported to make end of life decisions. Finally, it takes significant support of both the patient and caregiver by a skilled team of clinicians to ensure a gentle and peaceful death at home.

Unless we have all these components in place, we can’t expect to see major and sustained improvements in end-of-life care.

Previously: “Everybody dies – just discuss it and agree on what you want”In honor of National Healthcare Decisions Day: A reminder for patients to address end-of-life issuesA call to “improve quality and honor individual preferences at the end of life”Study: Doctors would choose less aggressive end-of-life care for themselves and On a mission to transform end-of-life care
Photo by National Cancer Institute

In the News, Neuroscience, Research

A year-long trip: One patient’s drug use linked to Alice in Wonderland syndrome

A year-long trip: One patient's drug use linked to Alice in Wonderland syndrome

8303093547_968a17bc4f_zA mind-bending condition long known for its associations with migraines may have another cause: acid use. Sufferers of Alice in Wonderland syndrome, a neurological disorder named in 1955, experience distortions of proportions: The world does not appear as it should be. Instead, it is too small, too close, too big or too far, just as was the case for the main character of the classic novel after eating a very small cake that read “EAT ME:”

“Good-bye feet!” said Alice, for when she looked down at her feet, they seemed to be almost out of sight, they were getting so far off. “Oh my poor little feet, I wonder who will put on your shoes and stockings for you now, dears? I’m sure I shan’t be able.”

For decades, this rare syndrome has been linked to migraines, but a new case report in the Israel Journal of Psychiatry shows that for one patient, it was brought on by LSD use — with his symptoms continuing for a year after the drug use has stopped.

Although researchers aren’t sure what caused the patient to experience the ongoing symptoms, the syndrome is generally caused by a hypersensitivity of the brain. Stanford neurologist Sheena Aurora, MD, explains in a LiveScience article:

This hypersensitivity typically starts in the occipital lobe, the visual region at the back of the brain. However, it can spread to the parietal lobes… which discern sizes and shapes, Aurora said.

Scholars have speculated that Lewis Carroll experienced migraines, which might have inspired Alice’s atypical adventures.

Previously: Director of Stanford Headache Clinic answers your questions on migraines and headache disorders, Advice on managing migraines and More attention, funding needed for headache care
Image by new 1luminati

Aging, In the News, Public Health, Sleep

Nothing to snort over: Why snoring should be taken seriously

Nothing to snort over: Why snoring should be taken seriously

6258904896_ec4a6f155a_zIt’s the middle of the night—or maybe the middle of the day—and all seems well. Then, you hear it: a low, rumbling, animalistic sound. It could be a snort or a growl or even a snarl. But it’s not an animal at all. It’s a person who is snoring far too loudly for your liking, and the sound only seems to be getting worse.

It’s safe to say we all know someone who snores – or we may even do it ourselves. A Huffington Post article puts a spotlight on snoring and features Stanford’s Rafael Pelayo, MD, who explains why it occurs, why it becomes increasingly worse with age, and, most importantly, why it could signal a potentially serious health problem.

“Think of fire and a fire alarm,” Pelayo says. “The snoring is the alarm. If there’s a fire and the fire alarm goes off and I disconnect the alarm, it doesn’t mean I put out the fire. The fire could still be burning.”

Snoring could be a symptom of sleep apnea, a disorder in which a person’s breathing repeatedly stops and starts during sleep. Apnea is a legitimate medical issue that can be harmful if gone unchecked, and Pelayo encourages anyone who snores to get tested for it.

Alex Giacomini is an English literature major at UC Berkeley and a writing and social media intern in the medical school’s Office of Communication and Public Affairs.

Previously: New recommendation: Adults need at least 7 hours of sleep each night, Why untreated sleep apnea may cause more harm to your health than feeling fatigued and How insufficient sleep can lead to weight gain 
Photo by Marc Lewis

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