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Addiction, In the News, Public Health, Public Safety

Can the “24/7 sobriety” model reduce drunken disorderly conduct and violence in London?

beer_london_pubIn an article published yesterday in the Telegraph, Stanford addiction expert Keith Humphreys, PhD, discusses how public officials in London are turning to the United States’ “24/7 sobriety” model in an effort to reduce repeat offenders convicted of alcohol-related crimes. The program, which combines mandatory sobriety and daily breathalyser tests, was created under Humphreys’ guidance. He writes:

Research by the RAND Corporation – a US-based non-profit global policy think tank – found that 24/7 sobriety dropped repeat drink driving arrests by 12 per cent. The same study also yielded a pleasant surprise: domestic violence arrests dropped by 9 per cent, despite not being a focus of the programme. Removing alcohol from the lives of criminals can apparently have radiating benefits beyond those directly related to their most recent offence.

In light of its positive results, judges across the U.S. have been adopting the 24/7 sobriety approach. This week, under the leadership of Mayor Johnson and his team, a pilot of the programme will be launched in South London. Leaping the pond will come with some challenges, particularly around delivering sanctions swiftly within the constraints of British law, but local tailoring of innovations is always an essential part of making them spread.

In any event, with over one million alcohol-related assaults occurring nationally each year and many London boroughs being regularly marred by violence and disorder on weekend evenings, the time for new approaches to binge drinking criminal offenders has clearly arrived. The judges and probation officers who are undertaking this pilot should be applauded for refusing to accept the status quo.

Previously: Text messages after ER visit could reduce young adults’ binge drinking by more than 50 percent, Study shows legal drinking age of 21 saves lives and reduces health risks for young adults, Alcoholism: Not just a man’s problem and Stopping criminal men from drinking reduces domestic violence
Photo by Paul Downey

Cancer, Health Costs, In the News, Stanford News, Videos

TV spot features a more humane approach to late-stage cancer care

Updated 8-4-14: The video is no longer posted on the Al Jazzera website, but the online story is still available.

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7-30-14: Is it possible to cut the costs of late-stage cancer care by 30 percent and provide a much better experience for patients?

That’s the question that recently brought an Al Jazzera America TV news crew out to the VA Palo Alto Health Care System, to interview patients enrolled in a new Stanford-designed pilot study on cancer care. You can watch their 9-minute video on this topic here.

The guiding principle behind this cancer-care program is this: Make sure that patients are fully informed about survival odds and treatment side effects well before they’re on the brink of death, when emotions overwhelm the decision-making skills of patients, their families and clinicians.

“Eighty percent of all cancer patients express a desire to die at home, yet only 10 percent do,” says Manali Patel, MD, the VA hospital oncologist running this study. “These end-of-life conversations, which typically take two hours in the beginning and require many follow-on conversations, are too hard, time-consuming and draining for a busy oncologist to do well.”

For these life-and-death discussions, patients are assigned personal care coaches who help them understand the big picture — treatment side effects, survival odds and pain-relief options. They also have access to a 24-hour symptom-management hotline and an option for in-home chemotherapy.

Architects of this new cancer care model, working with Arnold Milstein, MD, at Stanford’s Clinical Excellence Research Center, estimate that this program will lead to fewer unwanted treatments and expensive emergency room visits, saving the overall heath-care system money, while at the same time improving patient quality of life.

Previously: Communicating with terminally ill patients: A physician’s perspective, Identifying disparities in palliative care among cancer and non-cancer patients, Uncommon hero: A young oncologist fights for more humane cancer care, The money crunch: Stanford Medicine magazine’s new special report and New Stanford center to address inefficient health care

Cancer, Dermatology, In the News, Public Safety, Research, Stanford News

A closer look at new research showing disproportionate rates of melanoma in Marin County

Last week, Cancer Prevention Institute of California/Stanford Cancer Institute researcher Christine Clarke, PhD, shared results of a new report (.pdf) showing that a county in California has higher numbers of melanoma skin cancer than the rest of the state. On this morning’s Forum Clarke joined two other guests, including Stanford dermatologist Susan Swetter, MD, director of the Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program at the Stanford Cancer Institute, to discuss the research and to offer skin safety and screening tips for the summer.

It’s worth a listen – especially if you live in the county just north of San Francisco.

Previously: Melanoma rates exceed rates of lung cancer in some areasWorking to protect athletes from sun dangers, As summer heats up take steps to protect your skin, Stanford study: Young men more likely to succumb to melanoma, New research shows aspirin may cut melanoma risk and Working to prevent melanoma

In the News, Nutrition, Research

How much caffeine is really in one cup of coffee?

How much caffeine is really in one cup of coffee?

coffee_beansPrevious research has shown that regularly drinking coffee could offer a number of health benefits, including reducing prostate cancer risk, improving symptoms related to Parkinson’s disease, staving off the development of Alzheimer’s, decreasing diabetes risk and providing antioxidants.

But too much caffeine can make you jittery, disrupt your sleep and, potentially, shorten your life span. So it’s often recommended that you drink coffee in moderation, which is defined as two or three eight-ounce cups of brewed or drip coffee.

The problem with recommending a certain number of cups, reports Scientific American, is that new research shows the caffeine and caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) content can vary greatly depending on the type and preparation of the coffee. From the piece:

Results showed that the caffeine-to-CQA ratio in espressos ranged from 0.7–11, depending on the preparation conditions. With serving volumes from 13–104ml, it’s no wonder that Crozier says ‘cup of coffee is an exceedingly variable unit. To estimate health benefits using cups may be very difficult,’ – and inadvisable in epidemiological studies.

But what are CQAs? Beans contain various (poly)phenols, including 3-, 4- and 5-O-caffeoylquinic acids, the main phenolic compounds in coffee. Epidemiological studies have suggested the link between the lower risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and endometrial and hepatocellular cancer in habitual coffee consumers might be due to the presence of CQAs in coffee. They sound like super-compounds, but that’s a big ‘might’, and research continues.

Whilst the biological effects of CQAs are uncertain, one thing we do know about them is they are more sensitive to roasting than caffeine. The bean or blend also affects the caffeine-to-CQA ratio. Arabica and Robusta are the most common bean types and the latter contains twice as much caffeine as the former.

The article highlights the need to better inform consumers about the actual amount of caffeine in coffee and the need for more research on the health benefits of coffee.

Previously: How the body’s natural defenses help protect cells from toxins in everyday foods and flavorings, What is coffee?, For new moms, coffee scores a point: Caffeine doesn’t seem to interfere with baby’s sleep in study and Does coffee lower the risk of prostate cancer?
Photo by Nina Matthews

In the News, Mental Health, Research

How are flight attendants affected by plane disasters?

How are flight attendants affected by plane disasters?

airplaneA few nights after the recent plane crash in Ukraine, I ran into an acquaintance who was heading to Europe later in the week. “It feels weird to fly,” she told me, comparing it to how she felt about boarding a plane for the first time after the 9/11 attacks 13 years ago. I could relate: During my first post-9/11 flight, I was jittery and uneasy the entire way from San Francisco to Minneapolis. (It didn’t help that I was flying alone, in the darkened cabin of a red-eye.)

If plane crashes and tragedies like the one in Ukraine can leave passengers feeling unsettled (or worse), how might they affect people who take to the skies on an almost daily basis? In a piece on The Atlantic yesterday, writer Rebecca Rosen reported on the work of Jeffrey M. Lating, PhD, a professor of psychology at Loyola University Maryland who has studied this issue. Rosen writes:

For flight attendants who worked at American Airlines on 9/11, the rates [of PTSD] were… just over 18 percent. This number is so high, Lating says, it is comparable to the rates seen among people living south of Canal Street in Manhattan, the neighborhoods closest to Ground Zero.

Lating and his colleagues found no statistical difference in probable PTSD rates between West Coast flight attendants and East Coasters, who were much more likely to have known the flight attendants killed on 9/11. For flight attendants, it seems that the trauma they experience following a crash comes not only from the loss and tragedy itself, but also from a deep sense of vulnerability. A follow-up study in 2006 found similarly high rates of probable PTSD at another airline, further suggesting that “it didn’t matter what airline you worked for,” says Lating. “The virulent factor in this was, ‘I wonder if I could possibly be next.’ ”

Those fears can make just doing one’s job as a flight attendant incredibly challenging. Many suffering from PTSD try to avoid sights and triggers that recall the initial trauma. But for flight attendants, those reminders are unavoidable, part of the work itself. To have to work through that anxiety, all the while servicing others and maintaining a sense of calm on a flight— “you could imagine how uncomfortable that would be,” Lating say

Previously: 9/11: Grieving in the age of social media and What 9/11 has taught us about PTSD
Photo by epsos.de

In the News, Pain, Patient Care, Research, Stanford News

More attention, funding needed for headache care

More attention, funding needed for headache care

In case you missed it, the San Francisco Chronicle ran a story over the weekend on migraines – and researchers’ ongoing search for a cause and universal treatment. Robert Cowan, MD, director of the Stanford Headache Clinic, was one of the people featured and told writer Stephanie M. Lee:

Headache care is 50 years behind things like diabetes and cancer… It just hasn’t had the attention, hasn’t had the funding, in order to get to the answers we need.

Previously: Director of Stanford Headache Clinic answers your questions on migraines and headache disorders and New Stanford headache clinic taking an interdisciplinary approach to brain pain

In the News, Stanford News

A curated selection of news from Dean Lloyd Minor

A curated selection of news from Dean Lloyd Minor

What should you be reading today? Over on OZY’s Presidential Daily Brief, Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the medical school, points readers to some of the most interesting stories in medicine, bioscience and beyond. Among his picks as guest curator are a recent Atlantic article on creativity and a Guardian piece on hill climbing. Of the latter he writes:

Climbing and walking in the hills provides beneficial exercise, relaxation and renewal. Hope Whitmore, a writer living outside Edinburgh, Scotland, describes her journeys as well as her struggles with rheumatoid arthritis. As someone who loves to walk two dogs in the foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains, I can certainly relate to Whitmore’s description of her evening walks as “a healing, a cleansing of the soul, drawing a line between the workaday world and the night time.”

Previously: A closer look at Stanford medical school’s new dean

HIV/AIDS, In the News

Mourning the loss of AIDS researcher Joep Lange

Stanford researchers specializing in HIV/AIDS mourned the loss today of Dutch scientist Joep Lange, MD, PhD, a leading AIDS researcher who died in the Malaysian Airlines crash yesterday in Ukraine. Lange, a virologist, was particularly well-known for his work in helping expand access to antiretroviral therapy in developing countries. He was among dozens of people on the ill-fated flight who were heading to the 20th International AIDS Conference that opens Sunday in Melbourne, Australia.

“We are all in a state of shocked disbelief here in Melbourne at the tragic loss of one of the giants in the global fight against AIDS and HIV,” Andrew Zolopa, MD, professor of medicine at Stanford, told me in an e-mail from the conference site. “I have known Joep Lange for more than 25 years – he was a friend and a colleague.  Joep was one of the early leaders in our field to push for expanded treatment around the globe – and in particular treatment for Africa and Asia… The world has lost a major figure who did so much good in his quiet but determined manner.  I am shocked by this senseless act of violence. What a terrible tragedy.”

David Katzenstein, MD, also an HIV specialist at Stanford, learned of the death while in Zimbabwe, where he has a long-standing project on preventing transmission of HIV from mother to child. He said Lange, a friend and mentor, had been a “tireless advocate for better treatment for people living with HIV in resource-limited settings. He was universally respected and frequently honored as a real pioneer in early AIDS prevention and treatment.” In 2001, Lange founded the PharmAccess Foundation, a nonprofit organization based in Amsterdam, which aims to improve access to HIV therapy in developing countries. He continued to direct the group until his death.

Lange served as president of the International AIDS Society from 2002 to 2004 and had been a consultant to the World Health Organization, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health. He led several important clinical trials in Europe, Asia and Africa and played a key role in many NIH-sponsored studies, said Katzenstein, a professor of medicine.

“He was a gentle, thoughtful and caring physician-scientist with a keen sense of humor and a quick and gentle wit. He was constantly absorbing, teaching and thinking about the human (and primate) condition and psychology,” Katzenstein told me. “He was much loved and will be sorely missed.”

HIV/AIDS, In the News, Public Health

Free, one-minute HIV testing…while you shop for clothes?

Free, one-minute HIV testing...while you shop for clothes?

outoftheclosetPerhaps you’re familiar with cafe-laundromats or sushi restaurants with tap dancing. But did you ever visit a second-hand clothing and furniture store to take care of your health-care needs? An audio segment and post on the KERA News (Dallas) blog features a local Out of the Closet shop with a free HIV testing site, and soon a community pharmacy, inside their thrift store – making it the 22nd branch of the U.S. chain to have both.

Bret Camp, the Texas regional director of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, which operates the thrift stores, said in the post, “Our pharmacy will have everything from blood pressure meds to diabetes supplies…How many places can you go and look at jeans while you’re waiting for your medication?”

More from the post:

It’s an innovative idea, says [Douglas Owens, MD,] a professor of medicine at Stanford University who also serves on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

A number of organizations, including the CDC and U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended universal HIV testing. Of course testing is only the first step, Owens says.

“When people get an adequate treatment for HIV, the drugs reduce their infectivity and so treatment for HIV not only benefits the person who has HIV; it also provides a very important public health benefit that reduces transmission,” Owens explains in the audio segment.

Previously: Task force recommends HIV screening for all people aged 15 to 65, Using Facebook to prevent HIV among at-risk groupsTask force issues draft recommendation for universal HIV screening and National HIV screening and testing could be very cost-effective
Photo by Marilyn Roxie

Ethics, In the News, Research, Transplants

Physicians more likely to become organ donors, Canadian study finds

Physicians more likely to become organ donors, Canadian study finds

When receiving advice from a physician, one might wonder what the doctor would choose for him- or herself. Recently we discussed here a study on doctors’ preferences for their own end-of-life care. Now, a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has reported on physicians’ views and behavior surrounding their own organ donation.

As a news@JAMA piece reports on the Canadian study, physicians are nearly 50 percent more likely than non-physicians to register as an organ donor. More from the piece:

Despite waiting lists for organs in many countries, the percentage of individuals registered in national organ donation registries in most countries is below 40%. The United States fares a bit better than average, with 48% of adults registered as organ donors.

Concerns about organ donation have led to lower-than-average rates of registration in Ontario, Canada, where only about 25% of adults have registered. Currently, there are more than 1500 people on transplant waiting lists in Ontario.

Study author Alvin Ho-ting Li, BHSc, a PhD candidate at Western University in Ontario, Canada, discusses the study’s purpose and findings further in a Q&A section of the piece.

Previously: More on doctors and end-of-life directivesStudy: Doctors would choose less aggressive end-of-life care for themselvesStudents launch Stanford Life Savers initiative to boost organ donation and Family ties: One sister saves another with live liver donation

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