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What if you could stitch together single cells any way you wanted to? Potential medical and even industrial applications abound.

What if you could stitch together single cells any way you wanted to? Potential medical and even industrial applications abound.

A former Stanford biodesign innovation fellow describes how he and colleagues came to develop an inexpensive and simple tool to diagnose arrhythmias.

A former Stanford biodesign innovation fellow describes how he and colleagues came to develop an inexpensive and simple tool to diagnose arrhythmias.

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In an interview, Stanford bioengineer Michael Fischbach discussed the growing knowledge of the bacteria in our bodies and what that means for the future of medicine.

In an interview, Stanford bioengineer Michael Fischbach discussed the growing knowledge of the bacteria in our bodies and what that means for the future of medicine.

Stanford uses virtual reality to train emergency physicians, including on how to manage constant interruptions during a patient exam.

Stanford uses virtual reality to train emergency physicians, including on how to manage constant interruptions during a patient exam.

Stanford researchers are hosting an online competition featuring virtual athletes. Their goal: help people learn to walk and run after losing a limb.

Stanford researchers are hosting an online competition featuring virtual athletes. Their goal: help people learn to walk and run after losing a limb.

A group of biodesign fellows developed a potential treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia, an age-related condition that affects many men.

A group of biodesign fellows developed a potential treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia, an age-related condition that affects many men.

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A look back at how a team of biodesign fellows developed a potentially life-saving device to treat patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia.

A look back at how a team of biodesign fellows developed a potentially life-saving device to treat patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia.

Researchers have made a molecular movie showing how retinal changes shape when hit by light. Retinal is critical to vision and many other light-driven processes.

Researchers have made a molecular movie showing how retinal changes shape when hit by light. Retinal is critical to vision and many other light-driven processes.

A system that circulates cold water may be the key to improving protective suits for infectious disease responses, firefighting and more.

A system that circulates cold water may be the key to improving protective suits for infectious disease responses, firefighting and more.

When a team of biodesign fellows encountered a large population of patients who suffered from contact lens-induced dry eye, they set out to fix the problem.

When a team of biodesign fellows encountered a large population of patients who suffered from contact lens-induced dry eye, they set out to fix the problem.

A design challenge called Disrupt Diabetes was created and spearheaded by two Stanford seniors — best friends and aspiring doctors who felt that innovations for people with diabetes should bubble up from patients’ daily experiences and priorities.

A design challenge called Disrupt Diabetes was created and spearheaded by two Stanford seniors — best friends and aspiring doctors who felt that innovations for people with diabetes should bubble up from patients’ daily experiences and priorities.

Stanford Biodesign students showcased their projects at a recent event on campus. Winning projects include a test to screen blood donations for hepatitis B and a treatment that can reduce ankle swelling.

Stanford Biodesign students showcased their projects at a recent event on campus. Winning projects include a test to screen blood donations for hepatitis B and a treatment that can reduce ankle swelling.

A Stanford-led research team has developed a simple blood test for pregnant women that shows, with 75-80 percent accuracy, which pregnancies will end in premature birth.

A Stanford-led research team has developed a simple blood test for pregnant women that shows, with 75-80 percent accuracy, which pregnancies will end in premature birth.