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Medical Education, Medicine X, Stanford News

Lloyd B. Minor, Stanford medical school’s dean, shares five principles of leadership

Lloyd B. Minor, Stanford medical school's dean, shares five principles of leadership

Dean_MinorOne of the highlights of this past weekend’s Medicine X was a course – “Navigating Complexity and Change: Principles of Leadership” – taught by our own leader, Lloyd B. Minor, MD. I sat in on the thoughtful and robust discussion, which focused on five principles that Minor developed throughout his career as a scientist, surgeon and academic leader. Students in the class were a mix of ePatients, researchers, entrepreneurs, and physicians, including a neuroanesthesiologist at Yale School of Medicine.

The first principle that Minor introduced was listening and learning, which, he said “underlie success in everything.” He went on to say, “I think a lot of leadership problems and failures come about when leaders are not, first and foremost, good listeners.”

Listening to others in the organization articulate their core values and vision provides a cultural context and helps leaders avoid the pitfall of their viewpoint being seen as counter to the organization’s. It also allows leaders to better understand those who disagree with them, he said. Drawing on his recent experience transitioning from provost and senior vice president of academic affairs of Johns Hopkins University to dean of Stanford’s School of Medicine, Minor explained that holding town hall meetings with Stanford faculty, students and staff were crucial in order to engage the community in charting a vision. “Vision is a derivative from listening and learning,” he told the class.

The next principle Minor discussed was building diverse teams. “Successful organizations thrive on diversity, and building diverse teams is one of the most important responsibilities of a leader,” said Minor. He emphasized that racial, gender and socioeconomic diversity, and diversity of viewpoint, are equally essential. Master Class students were advised to identify their weaknesses and surround themselves with individuals who have different backgrounds and cultural contexts and who possess strengths that can compensate for those weaknesses. In addition, if leaders listen and learn from a diverse team that provides constant feedback then they’ll create more opportunities for collaboration.

Once leaders have built diverse teams, the third principle comes into play: empowering teams. “You need to demonstrate the type of team behavior that you want individuals to exemplify to the rest of the organization,” he said. “That will determine how effective those teams are and enable you to be a better leader.” Among Minor’s tenets for empowering teams are: establishing a system of equitable accountability, allowing people to realize and correct their mistakes, establishing incentives, recognizing individuals or teams’ successes, and developing skill sets.

Minor went on to discuss the principle of managing and leading, stressing the point that while management and leadership have different areas of focus, being an effective leader requires one to be capable in management. “There is nothing that will derail leadership faster than poor management,” he explained. Leaders must not only articulate an organization’s vision and core values and build diverse teams to carry out those actions, but respond in a timely fashion, communicate, organize and coordinate.

Minor closed out his talk by touching on transitions. “This is a principle that is often missed and one that often leads to bad consequences for the individual, as well as the organization,” he explained. Leaders need to take time to reflect on both their transition to subsequent roles and the future of the organization. He warned that failing to carve out time to do so could result the erosion of leaders’ physical and mental health and damage the organization. A common mistake that he spoke to students about is when leaders refuse to let go of their former role and try to do the same job in a new position. To make sure Minor himself remembered to abide by this principle during his transition to Stanford, his wife gave him a business card holder for his desk with a quote from Lord Chesterfield that reminds us that in order to “discover new oceans, you must have the courage to lose sight of the shore.”

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category. 

Previously: Stanford Medicine X 2014 kicks off todayCountdown to Medicine X: 3D printing takes shapeCountdown to Medicine X: Specially designed apps to enhance attendees’ conference experience and Countdown to Medicine X: How to engage with the “no smartphone” patient
Photo by Stanford Medicine X

Events, Medical Education, Medicine X, Patient Care, Stanford News, Technology

Stanford Medicine X: From an “annual meeting to a global movement”

Stanford Medicine X: From an "annual meeting to a global movement"

MedX_musical_finaleAs Medicine X came to a close Sunday, ePatient and American Idol participant Marvin Calderon Jr. gave a special vocal performance that moved audience members to their feet and ended in an explosion of colorful streamers falling from the top of the main auditorium at the School of Medicine’s Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge.

The three-day event, which was attended by more than 650 people and watched via live webcast by several thousand more, is Stanford’s premier conference on emerging health-care technology and patient-centered medicine. The conference hashtag #MedX was a top-trending term on Twitter in the U.S. throughout the conference, with more than 48,000  tweets sent out between Thursday and Sunday.

Medicine X has historically examined how social media, mobile-health devices, and other technologies influence the doctor-patient relationship. But this year, the program also focused on how partnerships forged between health-care providers, patients and pharmaceutical industry would define the medical team of the future, amplify patients’ voices, and shape medical education. Along with the topics of relationships and connectedness, a number of key themes emerged over the course of the conference, including engagement, empathy, and the imp0rtance of  treating the whole person.

Daniel Siegel, MD, clinical professor of psychiatry at UCLA, touched on several of these themes during his opening talk about developing a healthy mind, an integrated brain, and empathetic relationships. “Our relationships give us a sense of being seen, of feeling felt, of feeling connected. Those are the fundamental ways we create well-being in our bodily lives,” he said. “We live in connection to each other… Relationship experiences that are stressful early in life can lead to medical problems later.”

Several sessions put a special spotlight on the importance of treating the whole person and the link between mental and physical health. Patients shared their experiences with depression and anxiety, and many revealed how they had to grieve the loss of their healthy self in order to accept their new life. They also spoke about how they felt weakened by their mental-health condition and struggled to be empowered, or proactive, in their health care. Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD, MPH, a psychologist and professor of counseling and school psychology at the University of Massachusetts Boston, told patients, “Maybe the ‘e’ in ePatient is not enough. Maybe you need a ‘c’ that stands for connected. If you are connected, then the burden that you are feeling can be shared.”

Larry Chu and patient - smallSentiments about the need to foster empathy in medicine were discussed in parallel panels and during coffee break chats. Emily Bradley, an ePatient with a rare type of autoimmune arthritis, told attendees at a session about invisible pain, “I don’t fault my loved ones for not understanding my pain. I don’t want them to understand and I’m glad that they don’t. I think what’s missing is empathy.” Liza Bernstein, an ePatient advisor and three-time cancer survivor, told attendees at the closing ceremony, “Empathy doesn’t need that much. All empathy needs is us.”

The conference also tried to keep a focus on all different types of patient populations – including those who underserved. “There is a disconnect between solutions being build and the needs of vulnerable populations,” said Veenu Aulakh, executive director of the Center for Care Innovation during a talk on the “no smart-phone” patient. “We need to be designing [solutions] for today, not the future, and the 91 percent of patients that have a text-enabled phone.”

Larry Chu, MD, executive director of the conference (pictured above with Bernstein), warmly greeted the audience each morning – and on Saturday had a special announcement:  the launch of Medicine X Academy, a new effort aimed at continuing to build community among all stakeholders in health care and filling important gaps in medical education. The initiative will include a second conference in 2015 titled Stanford Medicine X ED (currently scheduled for Sept. 23-24, 2015). Joining Chu on stage to talk about the initiative, Bryan Vartabedian, MD, a Baylor College of Medicine physician and a longtime speaker at the conference, told attendees that medical education is “ripe for disruption.” And he noted that Medicine X – which has evolved “from an annual meeting into a global movement,” was poised to take it on.

Speaking of a global movement, there was very much a sense during the weekend that what was happening was bigger than just a conference – with at least one panel moderator telling attendees, “This conversation doesn’t end when we leave the stage.” And Bernstein summed up the three days of panels, presentations and powerful Ignite talks from ePatients saying, “I leave here re-energized, recharged, re-inspired and I hope you do too. Stay in touch on Twitter and see you next year!”

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Medicine X explores the relationship between mental and physical health: “I don’t usually talk about this”, At Medicine X, four innovators talk teaching digital literacy and professionalism in medical school, What makes a good doctor – and can data help us find one?, Medicine X aims to “fill the gaps” in medical education, Stanford Medicine X 2014 kicks off today and Medicine X spotlights mental health, medical team of the future and the “no-smartphone” patient
Photos by Stanford Medicine X

Chronic Disease, Medical Education, Medicine X, Mental Health, Parenting, Stanford News

Medicine X explores the relationship between mental and physical health: “I don’t usually talk about this”

Medicine X explores the relationship between mental and physical health: "I don’t usually talk about this"

standing o at MedX - smallThis year, Medicine X examined the relationship between physical and emotional well-being with three breakout panels. Psychologists and ePatients came together in two of the sessions to discuss depression in chronic illness and coping through online communities, as well as the topic of mental health and the whole person.

The conversations centered on five themes: how the uncertainty, fear and overall stress of living with a chronic illness, or being a caregiver, can lead to depression and anxiety; why patients’ desire to be empowered can prevent them from seeking help; why eliminating the stigma associated with mental health conditions is so important; the need to better integrate the training of future doctors and mental-health professionals; and ways patients can identify that they may need mental health services and how to find them.

Ann Becker-Schutte, PhD, a Kansas City-based psychologist who participated in both panels, told the audience, “Living with any of these illnesses, whether it’s rare or well-known, requires a lot of work. There is a burden of gilt, fear and shame that are all rolled into one. It’s not unusual for anyone facing these conditions to get tired and just say ‘I’m done’.”

Sarah Kucharski, a Medicine X ePatient advisor diagnosed with depression, anxiety and fibromuscular dysplasia, gave the audience insight into how depression can take over – explaining that she was shocked to learn during a therapy session that a recent string of major life events (getting married, having bypass surgery and buying a house) had elevated her score on the Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale to roughly 500. “I had no ideas that such things had a rating or that they could be cumulative,” she said. “As a result, I try to be more cognizant and slow down.”

Other ePatients spoke candidly and courageously about some for their darkest moments, with many saying it was challenging to discuss their experiences with depression and anxiety outside their inner circles. ”I don’t usually talk about this,” said Hugo Campos, an ePatient with an implantable cardiac defibrillator in his chest. “This will be particularly difficult to admit in public.”

Campos opened up about the severe depression he encountered during the month following a procedure to implant into his chest a cardiac defibrillator, which shocks the heart to control life-threatening arrhythmias and prevent sudden cardiac arrest. Since the device was implanted preventatively, he felt that by having the surgery he had somehow failed himself and continued to be unsure if the device was necessary. There was also anxiety and fear about the device spontaneously shocking him. He turned to his online community to learn how to cope with these feelings. “I felt I would be better of speaking with my peers online, rather than a professional who did not have an implantable device and didn’t know what I was going through,” he explained.

Scott Strange, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 1970 and also struggles with chronic depression, also turned to the Internet for support. “My journey to acceptance started when I found my online community. Until I found them, I never really faced it.”

Strange talked about growing up with the knowledge that not properly monitoring his glucose and insulin levels could be fatal. He also addressed the shame and exhaustion that results from “busting your rear end and trying to do everything your doctor says” and not seeing an improvement in your health.

While some turned to their patient communities online, others turned to someone outside of their social networks. When the demands of being a caregiver began to overwhelm Erin Moore, the mother of a four-year-old son with cystic fibrosis (CF) and three other children, she opted not to discuss it with someone well-versed with her situation. “Initially I sought help outside of the CF community because I was aware of how many people rely on me for my strength and I didn’t want to admit a weakness.”

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Medical Education, Medical Schools, Medicine X, Technology

At Medicine X, four innovators talk teaching digital literacy and professionalism in medical school

At Medicine X, four innovators talk teaching digital literacy and professionalism in medical school

med ed panelOne of my favorite talks yesterday at Stanford’s Medicine X was “Fostering Digital Citizenship in Medical School,” where four esteemed panelists talked about the innovative programs they’ve put in place at their institutions.

The physicians joked several times that a good panel often involves controversy or conflict among speakers – but the four of them weren’t in disagreement about much. They all believe that things like understanding social media and knowing how to build one’s digital footprint are crucial skills for doctors-to-be, even if those aren’t an obvious focus for the students themselves. “We can’t expect students to understand” this, said Warren Wiechmann, MD, an associate dean at UC Irvine School of Medicine. “They’re focused on learning core forms of medicine.” (Wiechmann started in 2010 a program to provide each incoming medical student with an iPad and has since added to the school’s curriculum courses on topics such as social media, wearables, and new digital trends in medicine.)

Kyra Bobinet, MD, PhD, who worked alongside Stanford anesthesiologist (and Medicine X executive director) Larry Chu, MD, to develop and teach Engage and Empower Me, an online course that focuses on patient-engagement design, noted that it’s academic leaders’ job to be “forward-thinking” for the students “so they’re so they’re not behind” when they become physicians. And Bryan Vartabedian, MD, who created at Baylor College of Medicine Digital Smarts, a four-year curriculum that focuses on “professionalism, safety, and mindfulness with social media,” agreed. “We’re asking big questions here,” he told the audience. “What does a doctor need to know 20 years from now? Will he (or she) know how to send a tweet? Do we have to be platform-specific [when teaching]?”

A portion of the 45-minute talk was devoted to the difficulty of incorporating new things in a medical school’s curriculum, which is, panelist Amin Azzam, MD, said, already “chock full.” Said Wiechmann: “The big dilemma is what do we take out to put in in?” In turn, many of the schools’ instructions on digital professionalism and literacy come in the form of elective courses.

When discussing other challenges, Wiechmann said the “line ups not very deep” when it comes to leaders in medical school who know about digital media. These topics aren’t “even on the radar” of many faculty-instructors, he said. The panelists also mentioned that the students – most of whom barely remember a time before e-mail, and many of whom consider themselves tech-savvy – don’t always think they need training on digital issues. “In one way they know a lot about technology, but they don’t get how to be doctors,” pointed out Azzam, who developed a University of California elective course that allows 4th year medical students to edit Wikipedia for academic credit. (“We want them to be digital contributors, not merely digital consumers,” he explained.)

Vartabedian said the information that Baylor provides to their students is contextual. Teaching medical students about smartphone use or social media in general wouldn’t be terribly helpful, he pointed out – but it becomes valuable “if you talk about it in the wards.” What should you do, for example, if a patient engages you via Twitter?

The end of the discussion shifted to patient engagement and the need to educate students about just the thing Vartabedian mentioned (i.e. how to interact with patients on social media) and how the e-patient movement works. “I have a responsibility as an educator to put this content [about patient engagement] – more than, say, biochemistry – in front of students,” said Wiechmann.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Medicine X aims to “fill the gaps” in medical education, More reasons for doctors and researchers to take the social-media plunge, A reminder to young physicians that when it comes to social media, “it’s no longer about you”, A conversation about digital literacy in medical education, Advice for physicians when interacting with patients online and How can physicians manage their online persona? KevinMD offers guidance
Photo by Stanford Medicine X

Medicine and Society, Medicine X, Patient Care, Technology

What makes a good doctor – and can data help us find one?

What makes a good doctor - and can data help us find one?

Ornstein panelWhile much conversation at Medicine X focused around the doctor-patient relationship, ProPublica reporter Charles Ornstein posed to conference attendees this morning a more fundamental question: How do you find a doctor? “This is trickier than you think,” he said and proceeded to discuss how data can yield helpful information for those looking for (or assessing their current) physician. He outlined some of the information – mostly involving doctor-industry relationships and physician-prescribing practices – that ProPublica has gleaned from federal databases, and he outlined questions that patients might want to ask their doctors about such things. (“So my doctor has a relationship with a company. But how is that affecting my care?” he said.)

Ornstein spent a good amount of time discussing the importance of making information – presumably not just information on negative things, such as whether a doctor appears to over-prescribe a certain medication or has ever been disciplined, but also about thoughts on physicians’ care from patients – more widely available.“We all want doctors who are good at what they’re doing clinically, and it’s time for us to stop making that a secret,” he said, before making his closing statement that “Data should be freed so we can make better health-care decisions.”

In the panel session – moderated by our own Paul Costello – that followed, several important points were made. First, Vivian Lee, MD, PhD, MBA, dean of the University of Utah School of Medicine and CEO of University of Utah Health Care, reminded the audience that the “majority of doctors are not bad apples” and can improve on things if given the chance. University of Utah makes patient-survey information publicly available, and she described the six-month period before this service was launched as a time where doctors worked to boost their level of care. Almost every doctor received at least 4 out of 5 stars by the time the rankings went online, she said.

Panelist Carly Medosch, a patient advocate who has had Crohn’s disease for 20 years, expressed support for access to physician data but pointed out that she doesn’t have time to dig through “tons and tons of research” – she not only has a regular job but a second job managing her disease. And “If I’m taken to the ER for a ruptured intestine I don’t have time to ask questions” about, for example, a doctor’s industry relationships, she pointed out. It was an important reminder that access to data alone might not greatly benefit the average chronically ill patient.

Towards the end of the session, the panelists shared their own ideas of what makes a good doctor, with Ornstein listing good clinical outcomes and empathy as two must-haves. Numerous attendees took to Twitter to express their own thoughts, including patient advocate Liza Bernstein, who offered at least 10 criteria. (My personal favorite: “What kind of PERSON are you? Yes, always, top of your field, but are you a #mensch?) Given the complexity of the issue, as outlined during the panel, I think this attendee hit the nail on the head by tweeting:

What makes a good doctor? Medicine is not a monolith. There is no simple, single answer, regardless of data availability.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Medicine X aims to “fill the gaps” in medical education, Relationships the theme of the day at Stanford’s Medicine X, Stanford Medicine X 2014 kicks off today and Medicine X spotlights mental health, medical team of the future and the “no-smartphone” patient
Photo of Ornstein (far right) and panelists by Stanford Medicine X

Medical Education, Medicine X, Stanford News, Uncategorized

Medicine X aims to “fill the gaps” in medical education

Medicine X aims to "fill the gaps" in medical education

Larry Chu  - intro remarks - smallWhen conference director Larry Chu, MD, took the stage this morning to welcome attendees to Day Two of Medicine X, few people knew he had big news to share. But moments after summarizing yesterday’s “great discussions,” which show, he said, what can be accomplished when “we pay attention to all voices,” he announced the launch of Medicine X Academy. It’s an umbrella, he explained, for a variety of  initiatives that will take MedX beyond conference walls and “quicken the pace of changing the culture of health care.” With the academy, he and his group will continue building a community and work on filling important gaps in education – with a focus on, among other things:

  • the importance of participatory medicine and the use of social media in patient engagement
  • the use of technology to meet the needs of millenials
  • the development of ways to best serve underserved or aging individuals
  • the inclusion of end-of-life issues in health-care discussions

The academy will offer massive open online courses and patient education programs and will host a new conference – MedX Ed – to occur just before next year’s regular Medicine X event. Noting that MedX has morphed from an annual meeting to a “global movement,” conference speaker Bryan Vartabedian, MD, noted that it’s “very well prepared” to address issues in medical education. “We have a global community of innovators and, most importantly, we have the proper mindset” to enact change, he told the audience.

The news got those in the audience (many of whom had barely had their first sip of coffee) buzzing. “Very cool – New #MedX ED conference will translate ideas into actionable parts of medical education,” wrote one attendee on Twitter, adding this was a necessary thing. “This is bigger than just ‘walking the talk’,” agreed another. “We’re going to change the future of health care.”

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Relationships the theme of the day at Stanford’s Medicine X, Stanford Medicine X 2014 kicks off today and Medicine X spotlights mental health, medical team of the future and the “no-smartphone” patient
Photo by Stanford Medicine X

Medicine and Society, Medicine X, Patient Care, Technology

Relationships the theme of the day at Stanford’s Medicine X

Relationships the theme of the day at Stanford's Medicine X

Larry Chu long shot

Medicine X began today with a theatrical bang as quotes from past speakers filled the main presentation hall and flashed across on the stage against an electrifying soundtrack. In welcoming both old and new friends to the conference, Larry Chu, MD, associate professor of anesthesia at the School of Medicine and executive director of the conference, repeated a sentiment from last year’s event, saying, “You belong here with us – we all care about health care.”

Stanford’s premier conference on emerging health-care technology and patient-centered medicine, the event attracted more than 400 patients, health-care providers, technologists, researchers and entrepreneurs to engage in moon shot thinking about the future of medicine and health care. Several hundred more watched the conference webcast.

“We’ve seen information technologies transform lives in so many ways; now it’s time to harness this power to improve health,” Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the medical school, told the audience in the morning. He encouraged attendees “to think big” and to use their time at Medicine X to identify collaborators to take their ideas from concept to reality.

Collaborations and relationships were the theme of the day, with sessions focused on how engaged patients and their doctors can become the medical team of the future, how the pharmaceutical industry and patients can work together in the drug discovery and clinical trial process, how chronic-disease patients use self-trackers as a sort of partner in their care, and how developers of digital technologies are collaborating with those who might not have an obvious voice. As one Twitter user commented, “Most common words at #medx conference so far: transparent, engaged, relationships, connected.”

Medicine X continues tomorrow and Sunday. If you’re unable to attend the conference in person, you can participate in plenary sessions virtually through a high-quality streaming webcast; registration for the Global Access Program webcast is free. We’ll also be live tweeting the keynotes and other proceedings from the conference; you can follow our tweets on the @SUMedicine feed or follow the hashtag #MedX.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category. 

Previously: Stanford Medicine X 2014 kicks off todayCountdown to Medicine X: 3D printing takes shapeCountdown to Medicine X: Specially designed apps to enhance attendees’ conference experience and Countdown to Medicine X: How to engage with the “no smartphone” patient
Photo by Stanford Medicine X

Medicine X, Stanford News, Technology

Stanford Medicine X 2014 kicks off today

Stanford Medicine X 2014 kicks off today

Medicine_XMedicine X, Stanford’s premier conference on emerging health-care technology and patient-centered medicine, kicks off today on campus. The three-day event opens with a keynote from Daniel Siegel, MD, clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California-Los Angeles, titled “Interpersonal Connection, Self-Awareness and Well-Being: The Art and Science of Integration in the Promotion of Health.” During the talk, he’ll discuss his approach to developing a healthy mind, an integrated brain, and empathetic relationships.

The conference is being held at the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge. This year’s program will spotlight the relationship between physical and mental well-being with three breakout panels. Additional presentations and panels will focus on the medical team of the future, the use of self-tracking tools to improve chronic disease patients’ health, opportunities for the pharmaceutical industry to partner with patients in the drug discovery and clinical trial process, and ways to connect with “no-smartphone” patients — those who don’t have the access or resources to fully engage with health-enhancing technologies.

If you’re unable to attend the conference in person, you can participate in plenary sessions virtually through a high-quality streaming webcast; registration for the Global Access Program webcast is free. We’ll also be live tweeting the keynotes and other proceedings from the conference. You can follow our tweets on the @SUMedicine feed or follow the hashtag #MedX.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Countdown to Medicine X: 3D printing takes shapeCountdown to Medicine X: Specially designed apps to enhance attendees’ conference experience, Countdown to Medicine X: Global Access Program provides free webcast of plenary proceedings, Countdown to Medicine X: How to engage with the “no smartphone” patient and Medicine X symposium focuses on how patients, providers and entrepreneurs can ignite innovation 
Photo by Medicine X

Medicine and Society, Medicine X, Technology

A call to make digital-health technologies available to everyone

A call to make digital-health technologies available to everyone

In light of my conversation last month about the “no-smartphone patient,” I found this recent Forbes piece on the need to develop culturally sensitive digital-health technologies of interest. Contributor Rob Szczerba writes:

In recent years, technologies involving smart phones and data analytics have become an essential component of how healthcare is delivered throughout the world.  Moreover, some believe these tools hold special promise for people from poor communities, seniors, and ethnic and racial minorities.  In some cases, people from these groups are more likely to have chronic conditions that can be expensive to treat in the short- and long-term.  Unfortunately, many of the innovators developing health technologies are not well-equipped to understand the special needs of these groups.

Rohit Bhargava and Fard Johnmar, co-authors of ePatient 2015, describe this problem as “multicultural misalignment.”  They warn that digital health technologies, such as mobile and wearable devices, will be much less effective if they are not optimized to account for differences in age, gender, culture, ethnicity, knowledge, and literacy.  They believe that preventing multicultural misalignment is vital, suggesting that we must work hard to ensure “health innovations benefit all segments of society.”

As a reminder, Stanford’s Medicine X conference – where this topic will be discussed – begins tomorrow.

Previously: Countdown to Medicine X: How to engage with the “no smartphone” patient

Events, Medicine X, Stanford News, Technology

Countdown to Medicine X: 3D printing takes shape

Countdown to Medicine X: 3D printing takes shape

3D printed handFrom customizing lab equipment to assisting in surgical planning to developing models of proteins and pathogens, 3D printing is helping to reshape biomedical research and health care. This year, Medicine X (which kicks off one week from today) will explore the transformative force of the technology during a range of panels and demonstrations in the “3D Printing and the Future of Medicine” session.

During the session, attendees will have the opportunity to learn more about health-care related 3-D printing applications at the “3-D Experience Zone,” which will showcase technologies from leading manufacturers. Attendees can learn about surgical applications of 3D printing from 3D Systems; find out how 3D Hubs is creating a global community by connecting owners of 3D printers with those who want to utilize the technology; and see how Occipital’s 3D scanning hardware for the iPad is supporting patient care. Additionally, they can discover how Artec creates a 3D full-body scan in a mere 12 seconds and enjoy chocolate and candy from the ChefJet food printer.

The session will also feature two Saturday-afternoon panels titled “Diverse Distributed & Design-Driven” and “Innovation Implementation,” with the latter exploring:

…some of the challenges and issues to consider in this brave new world. Will the FDA approve printed food, pharmaceuticals, and medical devices? How can 3D printing startups include patients in their design process? What are the public health implications when almost anyone can print biomaterials from the comfort of their own home? And once we ensure public safety, how can we make 3D printing affordable and accessible for all?

Darrell Hurt, PhD, computational biologist and project lead for the National Institutes of Health 3D Print Exchange, is among the panelists, and Monika Wittig, director and co-founder of Live Architecture Network, will moderate the discussions.

“As a designer, I am thrilled that this conference continues to widen the view of valuable cross-disciplinary collaborations. This is decidedly the aspect that I found most profound during my first Medicine X experience,” said Wittig. “My hope is attendees leave this session feeling a heightened awareness of 3D design and production technologies and the many realms of potential engagement in health sectors including prototyping, globally-distributed production and mass-customized design.”

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Countdown to Medicine X: Specially designed apps to enhance attendees’ conference experience, Countdown to Medicine X: Global Access Program provides free webcast of plenary proceedings, Countdown to Medicine X: How to engage with the “no smartphone” patient and Medicine X symposium focuses on how patients, providers and entrepreneurs can ignite innovation
Image of 3D printed hand from Medicine X

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