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Countdown to Medicine X: 3D printing takes shape

Countdown to Medicine X: 3D printing takes shape

3D printed handFrom customizing lab equipment to assisting in surgical planning to developing models of proteins and pathogens, 3D printing is helping to reshape biomedical research and health care. This year, Medicine X (which kicks off one week from today) will explore the transformative force of the technology during a range of panels and demonstrations in the “3D Printing and the Future of Medicine” session.

During the session, attendees will have the opportunity to learn more about health-care related 3-D printing applications at the “3-D Experience Zone,” which will showcase technologies from leading manufacturers. Attendees can learn about surgical applications of 3D printing from 3D Systems; find out how 3D Hubs is creating a global community by connecting owners of 3D printers with those who want to utilize the technology; and see how Occipital’s 3D scanning hardware for the iPad is supporting patient care. Additionally, they can discover how Artec creates a 3D full-body scan in a mere 12 seconds and enjoy chocolate and candy from the ChefJet food printer.

The session will also feature two Saturday-afternoon panels titled “Diverse Distributed & Design-Driven” and “Innovation Implementation,” with the latter exploring:

…some of the challenges and issues to consider in this brave new world. Will the FDA approve printed food, pharmaceuticals, and medical devices? How can 3D printing startups include patients in their design process? What are the public health implications when almost anyone can print biomaterials from the comfort of their own home? And once we ensure public safety, how can we make 3D printing affordable and accessible for all?

Darrell Hurt, PhD, computational biologist and project lead for the National Institutes of Health 3D Print Exchange, is among the panelists, and Monika Wittig, director and co-founder of Live Architecture Network, will moderate the discussions.

“As a designer, I am thrilled that this conference continues to widen the view of valuable cross-disciplinary collaborations. This is decidedly the aspect that I found most profound during my first Medicine X experience,” said Wittig. “My hope is attendees leave this session feeling a heightened awareness of 3D design and production technologies and the many realms of potential engagement in health sectors including prototyping, globally-distributed production and mass-customized design.”

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Countdown to Medicine X: Specially designed apps to enhance attendees’ conference experience, Countdown to Medicine X: Global Access Program provides free webcast of plenary proceedings, Countdown to Medicine X: How to engage with the “no smartphone” patient and Medicine X symposium focuses on how patients, providers and entrepreneurs can ignite innovation
Image of 3D printed hand from Medicine X

Events, Medical Apps, Medicine X, Stanford News, Technology

Countdown to Medicine X: Specially designed apps to enhance attendees’ conference experience

Countdown to Medicine X: Specially designed apps to enhance attendees’ conference experience

Figure 3 - BlanketLast year’s Stanford Medicine X conference explored ways in which technology could be used to augment the attendees’ experiences. During breaks between sessions, organizers used specially developed software to transform television screens set up in the lobby outside the main auditorium into interactive spaces where participants could exchange ideas. On one screen, attendees used their mobile phones to text their reflections on previous sessions or respond to prompts such as: “What’s your dream for health care?” The texts appeared as yellow sticky notes on a virtual corkboard. Another screen served as a digital journal where participants could text comments about what they learned and have them displayed to a wider audience. As people walked up to the screen to read the contextually relevant content, they naturally started conversations. In an effort to bridge the divide between the people who were physically present at the conference and those who were watching the live-stream from other locations, an additional screen broadcast tweets from around the world in real time.

This year, conference organizers have developed three iPhone apps for Medicine X based on Apple iBeacon, a Bluetooth-powered location system. “When we heard about the iBeacon technology, it was clear that it would fit really well into a conference setting as well as being useful for allowing people to interact with the large-screen displays,” said Michael Fischer, a PhD student in computer science in the MobiSocial Lab at Stanford, who helped develop the app. “We brainstormed all the possible ways that the iBeacon technology could help people participate in the conference and came up with some ideas that we are excited to test out at the upcoming conference.”

In anticipation of this year’s conference, I reached out to Fischer to learn more about how the apps will further enhance attendees’ experience at Medicine X. Below he explains how they will facilitate networking among participants, allow them to provide feedback or rate speakers and serve as a sort of “flight-attendant call button.”

Can you briefly explain how the apps work?

One app allows us to extend the Wellness Room, so that people can request items without having to go to the room and miss part of a session. The Wellness Room provides special amenities, such as warm blankets or a place to rest, to assist patients in managing their conditions during the conference. The room was designed to help patients physically attend the conference who might have otherwise not been able to. For example, a previous ePatient attendee had a medical condition called cryoglobulinemia, which causes proteins known as cryoglobulins to thicken if the ambient temperature drops too low. If this were to occur, it could lead to kidney failure and would be life threatening. So it’s crucial for this patient to keep warm. Using the iBeacon technology we were able to develop a system that allows people to use an iPhone to request a blanket or other item be delivered to their seat. There will be iBeacons on all the tables in the room so that the phone will automatically know where you are sitting. All the requests will be forwarded to a volunteer who will bring the item directly to the table.

Another app will be used during the breaks to help people get to know each other. The application works by displaying short bios on a nearby TV screen. In this way, the screen acts as a type of watering hole that people can gather around. When new people approach, their bios will be added to the screen. When a person leaves the proximity of the screen, the bio will be removed. We’ll have multiple screens set up around the conference. Our hope is that people can find a group that they might not yet be familiar with. The service is opt-in and people can switch to and from stealth mode at any time. Conference-goers will also have the option to forgo this app altogether.

Lastly, we have developed a feature that will be used at check-in. We want to create an experience that will surprise and delight people from the moment they step into the conference. There is a tradition at Stanford during freshman year that when you first come to your dorm, the dorm staff yells out your name. It is pretty big surprise and makes you feel part of the community instantly. We wanted to replicate that experience as best we could for the conference.

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Events, Medicine X, Stanford News, Technology

Countdown to Medicine X: Global Access Program provides free webcast of plenary proceedings

Countdown to Medicine X: Global Access Program provides free webcast of plenary proceedings

Those unable to physically attend next month’s Stanford Medicine X conference can participate in the event through the Global Access Program, which brings high-quality streaming video of the conference plenary proceedings, live photos and other updates to viewers’ desktop or mobile device. More details on the webcast can be found on the Medicine X blog:

The Global Access team is led by Emmy-award winning television producer Bita Nikravesh Ryan and 2013 Stanford-NBC Global Health Media fellow Hayley Goldbach. Our photography team includes Academy Award-winning documentary filmmaker Theo Rigby, speaker portrait photographer Christopher Kern, and our special venues photographer Yuto Wantanabe.

This year’s Global Access team also welcomes inventor and cancer researcher Jack Andraka.

To participate in the program, you will need to register on the conference website.  Keep in mind that the live stream does not include coverage of breakout sessions, pre-conference workshops, Master Classes or the IDEO Design Challenge.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Countdown to Medicine X: How to engage with the “no smartphone” patient, Medicine X symposium focuses on how patients, providers and entrepreneurs can ignite innovation and Medicine X spotlights mental health, medical team of the future and the “no-smartphone” patient

From August 11-25, Scope will be on a limited publishing schedule. During that time, you may also notice a delay in comment moderation. We’ll return to our regular schedule on August 25.

Health Disparities, Medicine X, Stanford News, Technology

Countdown to Medicine X: How to engage with the “no smartphone” patient

Countdown to Medicine X: How to engage with the "no smartphone" patient

When I saw the full agenda of the upcoming Stanford Medicine X conference, the name of one of the panels – “The ‘No Smartphone’ Patient” -  jumped out at me. The conference is focused on the ways new technology intersects with health care, and it’s heavily attended by researchers, health-care innovators, and patients who strike me as likely to never leave the house without their smartphone or tablet. The topic seemed a curious thing for the organizers to offer.

Once I read the full description of the Sept. 5 talk, though, it made complete sense. Part of Medicine X’s aim has always been to empower patients to be proactive in their care and to contribute to the discussion on how technology can be used to improve human health. So if a significant chunk of the population is low-income and/or has limited access to health-enhancing technologies, it would be prudent for stakeholders to determine how to improve that access and how, exactly, to give those so-called “no smartphone” patients a voice.

Intrigued by the topic and wanting a preview of the discussion, I reached out to panelist Veenu Aulakh, executive director of the Center for Care Innovation (CCI), which develops patient-engagement innovations and provides support to the state’s safety-net providers (community health centers, public hospitals, and public health clinics). After noting that almost one-third of California’s population is considered underserved and vulnerable, Aulakh talked with me about what’s been done for underserved populations in recent years, how she believes the digital divide among various populations is shrinking, and what those attending “The ‘No Smartphone’ Patient” panel can expect to learn.

At Medicine X, you’ll be discussing some of the cultural, social, and economic barriers that prevent certain patients from fully engaging with health-enhancing technologies. Can you provide a hint of what those things might be?

There are a number of barriers for patients to fully engage with health-enhancing technologies. The solutions that are created today are often not built for low-literacy, non-English speaking patients. Having solutions in Spanish and written at less than a 4th grade reading level are critical for getting solutions adopted. In addition, many of these technologies are often introduced to patients via their health-care providers, and the solutions are not created at a price point that either safety net health systems or patients can afford. Also, the solutions need to be more reflective of the realities of patients lives – folks are extremely busy and don’t have a lot of time to hand-enter data or engage with technologies that don’t provide immediate value. If we’re going to get patients (and their providers) to use effective technologies, we need to make sure that they can see immediate benefits if they are to use these technologies regularly. Lastly, the smartphone penetration rate in low-income populations still isn’t at a level where it would be useful for most safety net providers to broadly offer smartphone solutions to their patients. As this changes, the adoption rate of health apps and similar technologies may rise as well.

Do you foresee a time when patients who currently face such barriers can become part of the e-patient movement?

I think there are already many vulnerable and underserved people who would consider themselves part of the e-patient movement. Health centers are now beginning to e-mail with patients, inviting them to participate in texting programs and starting to roll out other e-offerings. However, for more patients to join the e-patient movement, we need to reduce the barriers. As more patients move to smartphones, I believe we’ll see a shrinking of the digital divide. According to Pew Research Center, as of January 2014, 47 percent of low-income people had smartphones. As this number continues to increase, this will help low-income patients be active e-patients (assuming language, literacy and cost issues are addressed).

CCI works to bring various health-enhancing technologies to California’s low-income patients. What are some of the patient-engagement techniques you’ve seen delivered in recent years?

We’ve seen everything from building strong patient and family advisory groups who give input to clinics on how to better design care systems that are truly patient-centered, to launching efforts to hear from the patients about their needs through surveys, focus groups and ethnographic research. Many clinics are also starting to implement texting programs to follow up with patients between visits with appointment reminders, or send education reminders for patients with chronic diseases. They’re also starting to use remote monitoring devices like home blood pressure and blood glucose monitoring. The funding environment (and the limited resources of both clinics and patients) have hampered wide-spread adoption of these types of solutions, but clinics definitely see the value in engaging patients – with both high- and low-tech solutions.

How have your group and other safety-net providers involved patients in developing these techniques?

Many health centers have developed patient and family advisory groups to provide feedback to design these programs. Other clinics are beginning to use the principles of design thinking to better understand the needs of their patients and going beyond the traditional patient experience surveys to hear the real voice of their patients. However, much more work needs to be done to make this the standard of care.

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Medicine X, Stanford News, Technology, Videos

Medicine X symposium focuses on how patients, providers and entrepreneurs can ignite innovation

Medicine X symposium focuses on how patients, providers and entrepreneurs can ignite innovation

A special Medicine X event on Sept. 4 will explore how patients, providers and entrepreneurs can help ignite innovation in the health-care industry. During the daylong symposium, James Hereford, chief operating officer at Stanford Hospital & Clinics, will be presenting crucial opportunities for innovation in medicine today, and challenging physicians, patients and entrepreneurs to collaborate and build partnerships in an effort to create impact and change.

In the above Medicine X film, Hereford discusses the importance of patient-centered care, the need to treat the whole person and not just the illness and how including patients in pivotal discussions is crucial to transform health care. “I don’t think the world should be defined around us,” said Hereford. “I think the world should be defined around our patients.”

The brief conversation offers a taste of the thoughtful commentary that attendees can expect at this event. Other speakers include: Robert Pearl, MD, executive director and chief executive officer of The Permanente Medical Group; Stanford radiologist Lawrence Hoffman, MD; Mark Tomaino, senior industry executive at Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe; Vivian Lee, MD, PhD, chief executive officer of University of Utah Health Care; and Alexandra Drane, co-founder of Eliza Corp. For more information or to register for the symposium visit the conference website.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Medicine X spotlights mental health, medical team of the future and the “no-smartphone” patient, Medicine X Live! to host Hangout on design thinking for patient engagement and Quite the reach: Stanford Medicine X set record for most number of tweets at a health-care conference

Events, Medicine X, Mental Health, Stanford News, Technology

Medicine X spotlights mental health, medical team of the future and the “no-smartphone” patient

Medicine X spotlights mental health, medical team of the future and the “no-smartphone” patient

Larry_ChuInnovative thinkers and thought leaders engaged in using emerging technologies to enhance health-care delivery and advance the practice of medicine will gather here in early September for Stanford Medicine X.

As Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine, comments in a release today, Larry Chu, MD, associate professor of anesthesia at Stanford and executive director of the conference, “has made this the go-to event for e-patients, physicians and innovators who want to get together to map out the future of health care.” Chu also notes that the conference  “has distinguished itself through a singular commitment to inclusivity and by finding new ways to bring every voice and perspective into important conversations about health care.”

Now in its third year, Medicine X is building on this inclusive spirit by exploring a variety of new themes during its 2014 program. More from our release:

This year’s program will spotlight the relationship between physical and mental well-being with three breakout panels. Psychologist Ann Becker-Shutte, PhD, will moderate a session on how mental health affects overall health. A conversation about emerging technologies in mental health will be led by Malay Gandhi, managing director of Rock Health, a business accelerator for health-care technology startup companies. Additionally, patient advocate Sarah Kucharski will direct a discussion about depression caused by chronic disease and about coping through online communities.

“Mental health is imperative to address in the overall conversation about the future of health care,” said Chu. “We need to be thinking about the health of the whole person, not just a patient’s individual symptoms or disease.”

The three-day event will also feature panels on what the medical team of the future may look like; how patients with chronic diseases can use self-tracking tools to improve their health and support one another; ways for the pharmaceutical industry to partner with patients in the drug discovery and clinical trial process; and opportunities to connect with “no-smartphone” patients — those who don’t have the access or resources to fully engage with health-enhancing technologies.

Keynote speakers for this year’s conference, being held Sept. 5-7, include Daniel Siegel, MD, clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California-Los Angeles; Barron Lerner, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and population health at New York University School of Medicine; and Charles Ornstein, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and senior reporter at ProPublica.

For information about the program or to  register the Medicine X website. Last year’s conference sold out, and space is limited for this year’s event.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Medicine X Live! to host Hangout on design thinking for patient engagement, Quite the reach: Stanford Medicine X set record for most number of tweets at a health-care conference, Videos from Medicine X now available and “You belong here”: A recap of Stanford Medicine X
Photo of Larry Chu by StanfordMedicineX

Medicine X, Stanford News

Stanford Medicine X conference issues call for abstracts and presenters

Stanford Medicine X conference issues call for abstracts and presenters

Stanford Medicine X, a conference that explores how emerging technologies are advancing the practice of medicine, improving health and empowering patients,  is now accepting submissions for papers and speakers. If you’re interested in showcasing your work at Medicine X, you can apply on the conference website.

The conference will be held on the Stanford campus from Sept. 5-7, and the submission deadline for abstracts and presenters is March 1.

Last year, as described in a previous Scope entry, Medicine X “set a new world record” for most number of tweets at a health-care conference.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Medicine X Live! to host Hangout on design thinking for patient engagement, Stanford Medicine X seeking students for leadership program and “You belong here”: A recap of Stanford Medicine X

Medicine X, Stanford News

Medicine X Live! to host Hangout on design thinking for patient engagement

Medicine X Live! to host Hangout on design thinking for patient engagement

Put on your design-thinking cap and join a Stanford Medicine X  Live! Google+ Hangout and Twitter chat at 5:30 p.m. Pacific tomorrow. IDEO founding partner and Stanford d.school professor Dennis Boyle joins Brian Garcia, CTO of Healthagen, and ePatient Liza Bernstein to discuss design thinking and patient engagement. Ask questions using the #MedX hashtag on Twitter, and watch the conversation here as it’s happening.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Stanford Medicine X Live! explores strategies for achieving your 2014 resolutions and Medicine X to host Google+ Hangout with ePatients

Medical Education, Medicine X, Stanford News, Technology

Stanford Medicine X seeking students for leadership program

students at MedicineXEach year, Stanford Medicine X brings together stakeholders in health care to discuss the intersection of emerging technologies and medicine. According to director Larry Chu, MD, students have always been “a vital part our conference, from planning and staging to participating from the audience and on the stage” – and this year Medicine X is making its commitment to medical trainees more visible through a student program.

The student leadership program offers up to 10 spots for students to attend the conference, scheduled for Sept. 5-7, and is open to those studying premed, medicine, pharmacy, or nursing, as well as to PhD candidates and those in allied health professions.

“Creating lasting and sustainable change in health care means working with tomorrow’s leaders today,” Chu said of the importance of the program, which has a fast-approaching deadline. Chu is accepting student applications through Monday, Jan. 20.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: “You belong here”: A recap of Stanford Medicine X and A conversation about digital literacy in medical education
Photo by StanfordMedicineX

Medicine X, Videos

Stanford Medicine X Live! explores strategies for achieving your 2014 resolutions

Stanford Medicine X Live! explores strategies for achieving your 2014 resolutions

It’s one week into the New Year, so how are those 2014 resolutions coming along? If your motivation is starting to slip, don’t stress. As the panelists on last night’s installment of Stanford Medicine X Live discussed there are a number of opportunities to get back on track, now and throughout the year.

The live Google Hangout and Twitter chat explored the topic of health-care resolutions and brought together a diverse group that included: Jason Albrecht, pediatric palliative care coordinator for the University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital; Kyra Bobinet, MD, an engagement behavior designer in the Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab; Lawrence Chu, MD, executive director of Stanford Medicine X; Joyce Lee, a pediatrician and associate professor at the University of Michigan; Jerry Matczak, a community manager at Eli Lilly Clinical Open Innovation and ePatients Alan Brewington and Britt Johnson. The discussion was moderated by ePatient Sarah Kucharski.

In the archived video above, panelists address questions on topics ranging from taking a thematic approach to making resolutions, replacing Jan. 1 pledges with ongoing life goals, using other occasions (birthdays, anniversaries, a medical check-up) during the year to renew resolutions and harnessing social media tools, such as Twitter, to provide support and accountability. One particularly interesting recommendations was to infuse the principles of design thinking into the New Year’s resolution process and accept that, while you may encounter setbacks, in the end you’ll ultimately make progress towards your goal.

Previously: Mindful eating tips for the desk-boundAsk Stanford Med: Answers to your questions about willpower and tools to reach our goals and Stanford health psychologist offers tips for increasing your willpower

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