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Emergency Medicine, Health and Fitness, Mental Health

Stanford’s “time banking” program helps emergency room physicians avoid burnout

Stanford's "time banking" program helps emergency room physicians avoid burnout

saving_timeFor emergency room doctors, few things are more important than time. They’re trained to work quickly and efficiently to gain the moments, minutes and hours that can be the difference between life or death for a patient. Yet, few ER doctors have the luxury of time in their personal lives.

According to a 2012 study, physicians’ work weeks are roughly ten to 20 hours longer than that of other professionals. This means that it would take the average professional about a year and a half to accomplish what a hard-working physician does in a single year. With a schedule like this, it’s no wonder that burnout is an issue for many physicians.

So, Stanford’s Department of Emergency Medicine adopted a “time banking” program that allows doctors to log the time they spend doing often under-valued activities, such as mentoring and covering colleagues’ shifts, to earn credits for the work and home-related services that would normally gobble up their free time.

Recently, the Washington Post highlighted this time-saving initiative in a story featuring emergency physician Gregory Gilbert, MD. “This gives me more bandwidth at work,” Gilbert said. “And because I can hang out with my kids and not be exhausted all the time, I’m able to be the kind of parent I’d always hoped to be.” From the Washington Post story:

Stanford’s time bank, part of a two-year, $250,000 pilot funded largely by the Sloan Foundation, showed big increases in job satisfaction, work-life balance and collegiality, in addition to a greater number of research grants applied for and a higher approval rate than Stanford faculty not in the pilot.

And for the first time, this year there are no openings for new fellows in the Department of Emergency Medicine. “All our spots have been retained,” Gilbert said. “There’s been no turnover.”

Previously: Surgeon offers his perspective on balancing life and workProgram for residents reflects “massive change” in surgeon mentalityLess burnout, better safety culture in hospitals with hands-on executives new study shows and Using mindfulness interventions to help reduce physician burnout
Photo by: mbgrigby

Mental Health, Pregnancy, Research, Women's Health

Study shows mothers receiving fertility treatments may have an elevated risk of depression

Study shows mothers receiving fertility treatments may have an elevated risk of depression

5088785288_9f7a23f17a_zAn estimated one in four couples in developing countries encounter difficulties trying to conceive. In the United States, more than 7 million women have undergone fertility treatments and, as a result, millions of babies have been born through in-vitro fertilization.

While many may assume that failed fertility treatments would increase a woman’s risk of depression more than successful attempts that resulted in a live birth, research recently published in the journal ACTA Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica shows that the opposite may be true.

In the study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen analyzed data on 41,000 Danish women who had undergone fertility treatments. PsychCentral reports that “investigators discovered women who give birth after receiving fertility treatment are five times more likely to develop depression compared to women who don’t give birth.”

Lead author Camilla Sandal Sejbaek, PhD, discusses the results in the story:

The new results are surprising because we had assumed it was actually quite the opposite. However, our study clearly shows that women who become mothers following fertility treatment have an increased risk of developing depression in the first six weeks after birth compared to women who did not have a child.

Our study has not looked at why the depression occurs, but other studies indicate that it could be caused by hormonal changes or mental factors, but we cannot say for sure. We did not find any correlation between the number of fertility treatments and the subsequent risk of depression.

Previously: Stanford-developed fertility treatment deemed a “top medical breakthrough” of the year, Ask Stanford Med: Expert in reproductive medicine responds to questions on infertility, Image of the Week: Baby born after mom receives Stanford-developed fertility treatment and NIH study suggests progestin in infertility treatment for women with PCOS may be counterproductive
Photo by Big D2112

Behavioral Science, Mental Health, NIH, Public Health, Research

Developing certain skills may help you cultivate a positive outlook

34835574_9e61cfe6bb_zMany of us have heard that having a positive outlook on life can improve our mental and physical health. Yet, if you’re like me, you’ve noticed that it can be hard to focus on the bright side of things when you’re feeling anything but positive.

That’s why I was drawn to this article in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) newsletter. It discusses several NIH-funded studies on the topic and explains what it means to have a positive outlook and how a positive mood can affect your health. The really helpful information, from my perspective, is it also explains how developing certain skills, like meditation and self-reflection, can make you can feel more positive more often. From the NIH story:

Having a positive outlook doesn’t mean you never feel negative emotions, such as sadness or anger, says Dr. Barbara L. Fredrickson, a psychologist and expert on emotional wellness at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. “All emotions—whether positive or negative—are adaptive in the right circumstances. The key seems to be finding a balance between the two,” she says.

The research teams used a variety of techniques to learn about the underlying mechanisms of positive and negative emotions and what it is that enables people to bounce back from difficult times.

Among those who appear more resilient and better able to hold on to positive emotions are people who’ve practiced various forms of meditation. In fact, growing evidence suggests that several techniques—including meditation, cognitive therapy (a type of psychotherapy), and self-reflection (thinking about the things you find important)—can help people develop the skills needed to make positive, healthful changes.

“Research points to the importance of certain kinds of training that can alter brain circuits in a way that will promote positive responses,” Davidson says. “It’s led us to conclude that well-being can be considered as a life skill. If you practice, you can actually get better at it.”

Previously: Navigating a rare genetic disorder with a positive attitudePromoting healthy eating and a positive body image on college campusesWhen life gives you lemons: Study suggests the benefits of a positive outlook are context dependent and The power of positive moods in improving cognitive function among older adults
Photo by: premasagar

Behavioral Science, Medicine and Society, Men's Health, Mental Health, Research, Women's Health

Living with a partner boosts your health

lonely-273629_1280Partners help. They help with daily activities like dishwashing and dog-walking, but they also provide the all-valuable emotional support needed to cope with everything from a rough commute to the death of a family member.

And those without a partner, perhaps due to divorce, are more likely to suffer from depression or anxiety, according to a new study (in Spanish) in the Spanish Journal of Sociological Research. Women have it the hardest, says lead author Carlos Simó-Noguera from the University of Valencia, who is quoted in a recent Medical News Today article.

Women who have lost their partner “show poorer health than men with the same marital and cohabiting status, and are more likely to suffer from chronic anxiety and chronic depression,” Simó-Noguera said.

Men are also affected, however. Separated or divorced men “have higher risk for chronic depression than the rest of men,” he said.

The team gathered data from the European Health Survey on people between ages 25 and 64.

“The key is not marital status per se, but is found in the interaction between marital status and cohabitation status. Therefore, living with a new partner after the dissolution of marriage preserves the health of the people involved,”Simó-Noguera said.

Previously: Practicing forgiveness to sustain healthy relationships, “Love hormone” may mediate wider range of relationships than previously thought and Study offers clue as to why parents of daughters are more likely to divorce
Photo by cocoparisienne

Imaging, Immunology, Mental Health, Neuroscience, Research, Stanford News

Are iron, and the scavenger cells that eat it, critical links to Alzheimer’s?

Are iron, and the scavenger cells that eat it, critical links to Alzheimer's?

iron linkIf you’ve been riding the Alzheimer’s-research roller-coaster, brace yourself for a new twist on that wrenching disease of old age.

In a study published in Neurobiology of Aging, Stanford radiologists Mike Zeineh, MD, PhD,  and Brian Rutt, PhD, and their colleagues used a ultra-powerful magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) system to closely scrutinize postmortem tissue from the brains of people with and without Alzheimer’s disease. In four out of five of the Alzheimer’s brains they looked at, but in none of the five non-Alzheimer’s brains, they found what appear to be iron-containing microglia – specialized scavenger cells in the brain that can sometimes become inflammatory – in a particular part of the hippocampus, a key brain structure that’s absolutely crucial to memory formation as well as spatial orientation and navigation.

Zeineh and Rutt told me they don’t know how the iron gets into brain tissue, or why it accumulates where it does. But iron, which in certain chemical forms can be highly reactive and inflammation-inducing, is ubiquitous throughout the body. Every red blood cell that courses through our microvasculature is filled with it. So one possibility – not yet demonstrated – is that iron deposits in the hippocampus could result from micro-injury to small cerebral blood vessels there.

As surprising as the iron-laden, inflamed microglia Zeineh, Rutt and their associates saw in Alzheimer’s but not normal brains was what they didn’t see. Surprisingly, in the brain region of interest there was no consistent overlap of either iron or microglia with the notorious amyloid plaques that have been long held by many neuroscientists and pharmaceutical companies to be the main cause of the disorder. These plaques are extracellular aggregations of a small protein called beta-amyloid that are prominent in Alheimer’s patients’ brains, as well as in mouse models of the disease.

Because they weren’t able to visualize small, soluble beta-amyloid clusters (now believed to to be the truly toxic form of the protein), Rutt and Zeineh don’t rule out a major role for beta-amyloid in the early developmental stages of pathology in Alzheimer’s.

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Health Disparities, Mental Health, Pediatrics, Public Health

Stanford study of mental illness in incarcerated teens raises policy questions

Stanford study of mental illness in incarcerated teens raises policy questions

depressionMental illness is an even bigger problem for jailed teenagers than experts previously realized.

That’s the take-away message from a Stanford study, publishing today in the Journal of Adolescent Health, which compared 15 years’ worth of hospital stays for adolescents in California’s juvenile justice system with hospitalizations of other California kids and teens. Experts already knew that juvenile inmates are more likely than other young people to have mental health problems, but the new study gives fresh perspective on the scope of the issue.

The research team, led by Arash Anoshiravani, MD, an adolescent medicine specialist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, looked at 15 years of hospital-stay data for California’s 11- to 18-year-olds. From a total of almost 2 million hospitalizations, about 11,000 were for incarcerated youth.

Of these 11,000 hospital stays, 63 percent were due to mental-health diagnoses. In contrast, just under 20 percent of the hospital stays by adolescents from the general population were prompted by mental illness. Hospital stays were also longer for the incarcerated teens, suggesting more severe illness.

However, the kinds of diagnoses were pretty similar between the two groups, with depression and substance abuse the most common. From our press release about the new study:

The types of diagnoses suggest that many incarcerated teens’ mental health problems developed in response to stressful and traumatic childhood experiences, such as being abused or witnessing violence, Anoshiravani said.

“They’re regular kids who have had really, really horrible childhoods,” he said, adding that he hopes the new data will motivate social change around the problem.

“We are arresting kids who have mental health problems probably related to their experiences as children,” he said. “Is that the way we should be dealing with this, or should we be getting them into treatment earlier, before they start getting caught up in the justice system?”

Previously: Online health records could help high-risk teens, study finds, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital partners with high schools on student mental health programs and Increasing awareness and advocacy of emotional disorders with mental health first-aid programs
Photo by ryan melaugh

Mental Health, Neuroscience

No time for a vacation? Take a break without leaving the office

No time for a vacation? Take a break without leaving the office

3863917188_4972c8fe11_zWhen you’re tired, overworked and stressed out, a good vacation can be just what the doctor ordered. The catch is that it’s not always easy to take a break when you need it most. If you’re nodding your head in agreement, check out this Harvard Business Review piece by Emma Seppälä, PhD, associate director of Stanford’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education.

As Seppälä explains in her piece, workers in the United States tend to have less vacation days than employees elsewhere. Moreover, many people find it hard to truly “unplug” when they finally do take a vacation because smartphones, Wi-Fi and other electronic devices are so readily available.

But, fewer vacation days and smartphones aren’t entirely to blame for the bloated work schedules that are ubiquitous here and elsewhere. As Seppälä explains, many salaried employees with ample vacation time sometimes feel they can’t take an extended holiday because vacations are not “productive” and being out of the office, and out of touch, can have negative repercussions.

“Unfortunately, the logic of both employees and employers is highly flawed,” Seppälä writes. “Both fail to realize that cutting into vacation time is actually detrimental to both organizations and their employees both in terms of financial and productivity costs.” One short-term solution that can help employees endure a long period of work is a “mini-break”— a vacation that’s compressed into a few hours and can be taken virtually anywhere. She elaborates:

Research by Sabine Sonnentag suggests that detaching from work is essential to enhanced productivity. Her work has shown that, while people who do not detach from work suffering from greater levels of exhaustion, those who do recover from job stress and are more likely to have higher engagement levels at work.

If you really can’t take a proper vacation, Adam Rifkin, successful Silicon Valley serial entrepreneur and founder of PandaWhale, suggests “taking a little downtime every day rather than pushing it off for some getaway week.” Sonnentag’s research also suggests that if you make an effort to completely disengage from work when the workday is over – by, for example, engaging in a hobby you enjoy, exercising, or taking a walk in nature – you will reap the benefits: you will feel less fatigued, more engaged at work, and more energized when you leave work.

Stopping to smell the roses can make a big difference in your overall well-being during periods of high work flow, but a mini-break is no substitute for the real thing. So, if you absolutely can’t take an extended vacation, make the most of the downtime you have. Just be sure you also find a way to take that long vacation you’ve been dreaming of.

Previously: Exposure to nature helps quash depression – so enjoy the great outdoors!Seven ways laughter can improve your well-beingWhat email does to your brain and How social connection can improve physical and mental health and Out-of-office autoreply: Reaping the benefits of nature
Photo by Joe Penniston

Mental Health, Research, Stanford News

Animal study hints at potential treatment for skin-picking disorder

Animal study hints at potential treatment for skin-picking disorder

A condition known as skin-picking disorder may sound obscure but it’s one of the more common mental health disorders and can have devastating effects on its sufferers. An estimated 4 percent of the population – or roughly 1 in 25 people – suffer from the condition, in which they repeatedly pick or scratch the skin, sometimes leading to scarring or disfigurement.

People suffer in complete silence. They think they are the only one who has it, despite the fact that it’s very common, and it kills people.

“Skin-picking disorder is a surprisingly common condition, yet many patients avoid seeking help because of the shame and embarrassment,” says Joseph Garner, PhD, associate professor of comparative medicine at Stanford. “People suffer in complete silence. They think they are the only one who has it, despite the fact that it’s very common, and it kills people.”

The condition may lead to serious infection, requiring oral or intravenous treatment with antibiotics, he says. Patients may benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy, but there are precious few practitioners in the United States who are equipped to do this form of therapy, he says.

In a new study, Garner and his colleagues tested two antioxidants in mice with a form of skin-picking and found both compounds to be effective in treating the condition. Laboratory mice commonly suffer from ulcerative dermatitis, in which they excessively groom themselves, often leading to serious infection. These mice serve as a good model for the disease in humans.

In the study, mice who were fed the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) all showed some improvement,   and some 40 percent were cured, though the results took up to eight weeks. Another group of mice given glutathione, the body’s naturally occurring antioxidant, got better much faster; about half who got this treatment were fully cured, the researchers found.

NAC has been used in humans in a number of experimental settings, and some case reports suggest it could be useful in people with skin-picking disorder. However, it can be hard to tolerate, as it causes gastrointestinal side-effects, Garner says. Intranasal glutathione, on the other hand, bypasses the gut and liver and goes directly to the brain. In doing so, it may avoid these potential side-effects.

“It’s clearly working differently, or at least more directly,” Garner says. “This different response profile gives us some hope that there may be some non-responders, or people who can’t tolerate NAC, who may be helped by glutathione.”

He says it represents the first potential new treatment for the condition in years. He now hopes to test intranasal glutathione in a clinical trial among human patients with skin-picking disorder.

The latest study appears online in the journal PLOS ONE. The experiments were conducted by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

More on skin picking and related disorders can be found at www.trich.org.

Autoimmune Disease, In the News, Mental Health, Pediatrics, Research, Stanford News

Stanford doctors unraveling mysterious childhood psychiatric disease

Stanford doctors unraveling mysterious childhood psychiatric disease

BrainModel2A story in Sunday’s Wall Street Journal highlights Stanford’s leadership in treating a mystifying disease in which a child suddenly develops intense psychiatric problems, often after an infection. The disease, called pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome, can be terribly disabling, altering kids’ personalities, interfering with their school work and making it hard for families to function.

As the story (subscription required) explains, some physicians question whether PANS is actually a separate disease from the psychiatric diagnoses it resembles, which include obsessive-compulsive disorder and anorexia nervosa. But doctors at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford suspect something else is truly going on, likely an autoimmune attack on the brain. The team, led by Jennifer Frankovich, MD, and Kiki Chang, MD, is working to learn more about the disease:

In an effort to establish the science of PANS, the Stanford clinic is collecting extensive data on the patients. Doctors try to piece together what is driving symptoms from pediatric records, parent reports, even teacher interviews. They are analyzing DNA samples from each patient and looking for clues in their immune systems. If they find strep, they bank the strain for further research. “It is easier to study something that is established,” Dr. Frankovich said. “To build something new is really hard.”

The team’s insights from 47 of their patients were published earlier this year in a special PANS-focused issue of the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, and the researchers are currently working to expand the capacity of their PANS clinic, the first of its kind in the country. More information about PANS and its effect on children and families is also available in a Stanford Medicine magazine story I wrote last year about Frankovich and Chang’s work.

Previously: What happens when the immune system attacks the brain? Stanford doctors investigate and My descent into madness — a conversation with author Susannah Cahalan
Photo by GreenFlames09

Health Policy, Mental Health, Patient Care, Pediatrics, Stanford News

Stanford expert on new treatment guidelines for teens’ eating disorders

Stanford expert on new treatment guidelines for teens' eating disorders

eatingdisorder-plateEating disorders often begin in the teenage years, but, surprisingly, the medical community long lacked a teen-specific set of guidelines for treating these serious illnesses.

That changed in May with the publication of a set of practice parameters co-authored by Stanford eating disorder expert James Lock, MD, PhD, who also directs the Comprehensive Eating Disorders Program at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. The parameters were based on an extensive review of the current scientific evidence around eating-disorder treatment, including recent studies by Lock and his colleagues that show that teens’ parents can play an active role in helping their children recover from anorexia nervosa. That’s a big shift from traditional thinking about eating disorders, which held that young patients’ families should be shut out of treatment.

In a new Q&A, I talked with Lock about why the parameters were needed. He told me:

There have never been practice parameters that address eating disorders in children and adolescents, and expertise in treating these disorders has been sort of sequestered. Yet eating disorders are so prevalent and are such a severe problem: Lifetime prevalence in adolescent girls is around 1 percent, and the disorders have among the highest fatality rates of all mental illnesses.

Teens need treatment approaches that account for their level of physical and emotional development, the fact that their parents generally want and need to be involved in their recovery, and the fact that they have not usually had eating disorders for as long as adult patients with the same diagnoses.

Lock also discusses how he hopes the new guidelines will improve training of psychiatrists, how recent changes to eating disorder diagnostic criteria are making it easier for doctors to get their patients the help they need, and why outpatient treatment is the new front line for young people with eating disorders.

Previously: Patient tells how social media helped her overcome the “shame” of her eating disorder, Incorporating family into helping teens overcome eating disorders and Story highlights need to change the way we view and diagnose eating disorders in men
Photo by Darren Tunnicliff

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