Published by
Stanford Medicine

Category

Parenting

Parenting, Pediatrics, Stanford News, Technology

Using texting to boost preschool reading skills

Using texting to boost preschool reading skills

Stanford researchers find promising results from program that uses text messages, like this one, to support parents in helping their children learn to read.

A new program that sends weekly texts to parents to  remind them to engage in simple activities to boost their preschooler’s literacy skills appears to help children read. The program, called READY4K! and developed at the Stanford School of Education by education professor Susanna Loeb, PhD, and graduate student Benjamin York and tested at preschools at the San Francisco Unified School District, underwent an 8-month pilot conducted in 2013-2014. In a release describing the pilot program, Loeb described the challenges faced by parents:

The barrier to some of these positive parenting practices isn’t knowledge or desire, but it’s the crazy, busy lives… It’s difficult to have the time or focus to make all these choices as parents, and we’re helping parents do what they know they should do and what they want to do.

The program enrolled 440 parents, half of whom got literacy building tips by text and the other half got placebo announcements about the district. Parents who received literacy tips were more likely to engage in literacy activities such as reading to their children, reviewing rhyming words and playing word puzzles. Moreover, the authors note in a report that the preschool-age children scored higher on literacy assessment tests at the end of the pilot program than those whose parents had not gotten weekly texts. In the release, a representative of SFUSD notes:

I believe that all families want to be involved in their child’s learning, but many feel they don’t have the time or perceive that supporting their child’s learning might be labor intensive or something that the teacher is better at. The texting program offered some simple nuggets around literacy strategies and validated that families do want to be involved, if given information that is easy to receive and useful.

The READY4K! program was developed with accessibility and scalability in mind. York and Loeb carefully parsed early childhood literacy standards from the state into text-size bites, with the aim that they would be helpful and not add another layer of stress to the already busy parents’ lives.

SFUSD has expanded the program this year to all preschool and kindergarten parents. Loeb and York have heard from other interested school districts and have also added early math skills into the weekly texts.

Previously: Reading, book sharing less common in immigrant families, Stanford study finds, Researcher shows how preschoolers are, quite literally, little scientists and This is your 4-year-old on cartoons
Photo by L.A. Cicero/Stanford News Service

Obesity, Parenting, Pediatrics, Research

Study shows that toddlers benefit from rules about eating habits

Study shows that toddlers benefit from rules about eating habits

toddler_eatingA recent study from pediatrics researchers at the University at Buffalo suggests that toddlers who are faced with parental rules about what to eat develop better eating habits later in their childhood, regardless of the self-restraint they demonstrate. The connection between self-restraint and eating habits has been studied widely in adults and adolescents, but this research is among the first to investigate it in very young children.

The findings suggest that self-restraint in two year-olds doesn’t itself lead to healthier habits by the time the child is four; it must be combined with parental rules about eating. Neha Sharma, a co-author of the paper, explained the significance when presenting the research at ObesityWeek 2014 in Boston, as quoted in a University of Buffalo news release:

It is amazing to see that a parental rule about which types of food a child can and cannot eat could have such a great impact on child eating habits. Without these boundaries set by caregivers, the benefits of high self-regulation on weight gain and childhood obesity could be diminished. This illustrates just how important parental involvement is in influencing child eating habits.

Seventeen percent of American children age 2-19 are obese, as are nearly 35 percent of adults, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Obesity is well-known as a pressing public health issue, and children who are obese are much less likely to attain healthy weights as adults.

Furthermore, a study published this week in Pediatrics suggests that obese youth are very likely to become obese teens, contrary to a popular idea that overweight adolescents have “baby fat” that will disappear with puberty. Researchers found that a child’s weight at age 11 is a good indicator of his or her weight at age 16: 83 percent of obese fifth-graders remained obese, and 87 percent of normal-weight fifth graders remained at a normal weight five years later.

By setting guidelines and rules for toddlers, parents and caretakers can play a key role in guiding society’s very youngest members towards healthy eating habits with life-long impacts.

Previously: No bribery necessary: Children eat more vegetables when they understand how food affects their bodies, Examining why instilling healthy eating and exercise habits in children may not prevent obesity later in life and How to combat childhood obesity? Try everything
Photo by David Goehring

Chronic Disease, Obesity, Parenting, Pediatrics

Getting a handle on screen time: tips for parents

Getting a handle on screen time: tips for parents

child watches TV

Most parents know that they should keep screen time to a minimum, but how much is too much? Moreover, with the advent of many educational apps for tablets and smartphones, it’s easy as a parent to get confused about managing their childrens’ use of televisions, computers and tablets. Watching “Frozen” for the hundredth time is clearly entertainment, but what about playing with a Dora the Explorer app that teaches vocabulary? Should that count against a child’s screen time “budget?”

The Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford blog, Healthier, Happier Lives, had a post earlier this week that offers concrete tips from Thomas Robinson, MD, MPH, director of Packard’s Center for Healthy Weight. Robinson notes that educational screen time doesn’t need to count toward entertainment screen time, which he recommends keeping to less than an hour a day. But he cautions that parents should distinguish between real educational programs and entertainment disguised as education.

He also says that it’s easier to get kids to follow screen-time rules if parents are judicious about their own screen use (this includes time in front of a computer or with a smart phone, as well as TV time). One of the key reasons to turn off the TV (and other screens) is to avoid bad habits associated with screen time like eating high-fat, high-sugar snacks, especially while in front of a TV or computer. Another is simply to get kids to move more and be more active.

The bottom line? Robinson says:

More than anything else, just having family rules about how much, what, when, where, and with whom is the most important step in making screen time and technology work for your family, instead of against it.

Previously: Examining the effects of family time, screen time and parenting styles on child behavior, Childhood obesity expert to parents: Reduce your child’s screen time and Study: Too much TV, computer could hurt kids’ mental health
Photo by Vidmir Raic

Autism, Behavioral Science, Parenting, Pediatrics, Research, Stanford News

Study validates oxytocin levels in blood and suggests oxytocin may be a biomarker of anxiety

Study validates oxytocin levels in blood and suggests oxytocin may be a biomarker of anxiety

Karen Parker Oxytocin, sometimes dubbed “the love hormone,” can be tricky to study in humans. To conduct research on the connection between oxytocin and emotion, scientists want to assess the hormone’s levels in the brain. But sampling cerebrospinal fluid, the liquid bathing the brain, requires an invasive technique called a lumbar puncture. Measuring blood oxytocin is much easier, but some researchers have questioned whether blood oxytocin levels truly reflect what’s happening in the brain.

A new Stanford study simplifies the problem: It is the first research in children, and some of the first in any age group of humans, to indicate that blood and CSF oxytocin levels track together. The research also found a correlation between low-oxytocin and high-anxiety levels in children, adding to findings from animal studies and adult humans that have documented this oxytocin-anxiety link. The paper appears today in Molecular Psychiatry.

The findings raise the possibility that oxytocin could be considered as a therapeutic target across a variety of psychiatric disorders

The researchers recruited 27 volunteers from among a group of patients who needed lumbar puncture for medical reasons. The volunteers agreed to have oxytocin levels measured in their blood and CSF, and the parents of 10 children in the study answered questions about their children’s anxiety levels. From our press releaseabout the research:

“So many psychiatric disorders involve disruptions to social functioning,” said the study’s senior author, Karen Parker, PhD, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. “This study helps scientifically validate the use of measuring oxytocin in the blood, and suggests that oxytocin may be a biomarker of anxiety. It raises the possibility that oxytocin could be considered as a therapeutic target across a variety of psychiatric disorders.”

Parker’s team is now conducting studies of possible therapeutic uses of oxytocin in children with autism. They recently published a paper demonstrating that autism is not a disease of oxytocin deficiency per se; instead, oxytocin levels in kids with autism fall across a broad range. The findings hint at a future in which patients’ oxytocin levels could be used to guide treatment for autism or other psychiatric or developmental disorders. As Dean Carson, PhD, the lead author of the new study, explained:

“Our belief is that there are oxytocin responders and nonresponders,” Carson said, adding that the team is now testing this hypothesis.

…“Being able to have objective measures of psychiatric illness really will enhance early diagnosis and measures of treatment outcomes,” Carson said.

Previously: Stanford research clarifies biology of oxytocin in autism, “Love hormone” may mediate wider range of relationships than previously thought and Study shows oxytocin may boost happiness among women
Photo of Karen Parker by Norbert von der Groeben

Aging, Mental Health, Parenting, Research

Girls at high risk for developing depression show signs of stress and premature aging

Girls at high risk for developing depression show signs of stress and premature aging

14465-telomeres_newsAs we age and our cells divide, caps at the ends of our chromosomes called telomeres shorten. When a telomere grows too short, it will die or lose its ability to divide, which causes our skin to wrinkle or sag, as well as damage to our organs. Previous research has shown that depression, chronic stress and inflammation can accelerate this process, causing premature aging and making our bodies more susceptible to infections and disease.

In an effort to better understand the connection between stress, depression and changes in the body, Stanford psychologist Ian Gotlib, PhD, and colleagues studied healthy girls with a family history of depression and compared them to a group of their peers without that medical background. During the experiment, researchers measured participants’ stress response through a series of tests and analyzed their DNA samples for telomere length. According to a Stanford Report story:

Before this study, “No one had examined telomere length in young children who are at risk for developing depression,” Gotlib said.

Healthy but high-risk 12-year-old girls had significantly shorter telomeres, a sign of premature aging.

“It’s the equivalent in adults of six years of biological aging,” Gotlib said, but “it’s not at all clear that that makes them 18, because no one has done this measurement in children.”

The researchers are continuing to monitor the girls from the original study. “It’s looking like telomere length is predicting who’s going to become depressed and who’s not,” Gotlib said.

Based on these findings, researchers recommended that girls at high-risk for depression learn stress reduction techniques.

Previously: How meditation can influence gene activity, Shrinking chromosome caps spell aging cells, sniffles, sneezes… and cognitive decline?, Study finds phobias may speed biological aging and Study suggests anticipation of stress may accelerate cellular aging
Photo by Paulius Brazauskas/Shutterstock

Autism, Parenting, Pediatrics, Research, Stanford News

Parents can learn autism therapy in groups to improve kids’ verbal skills, Stanford study shows

Parents can learn autism therapy in groups to improve kids' verbal skills, Stanford study shows

HoldingHandsAutism is more than twice as common than it was 15 years ago. But the number of clinicians who treat the developmental disorder is growing more slowly than the number of new cases, prompting caregivers to look for novel ways to share their expertise as widely as possible.

One possible approach: Teach groups of parents an autism therapy they can deliver at home. A new study from Stanford and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, published today in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, found that small groups of parents could learn to deliver a scientifically validated autism treatment to their own children in a short series of classes.

The therapy, called pivotal response training, which has been validated in several prior studies, was targeted to kids’ language skills. The therapy gives parents a structured method for nurturing children’s verbal skills during everyday interactions.

The approach of having parents give treatment is meant to complement, not replace, one-on-one therapy with autism professionals. But it can still be valuable to children and their families, as our press release explains:

“There are two benefits: The child can make progress, and the parents leave the treatment program better equipped to facilitate the child’s development over the course of their daily routines,” said study co-author Grace Gengoux, PhD, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and a psychologist specializing in autism treatment at the hospital. “The ways that parents instinctually interact with children to guide language development may not work for a child with autism, which can frustrate parents. Other studies have shown that learning this treatment reduces parents’ stress and improves their happiness. Parents benefit from knowing how to help their children learn.”

… To use the treatment for building language skills, parents identify something the child wants and systematically reward the child for trying to talk about it. For instance, if the child reaches for a ball, the parent says, “Do you want the ball? Say ‘ball.’”

“The child might say ‘ba,’ and you reward him by giving him the ball,” [lead author Antonio] Hardan, MD, said. “Parents can create opportunities for this treatment to work at the dinner table, in the park, in the car, while they’re out for a walk.”

The researchers are now following up with studies that will give them more information about which children and families are most likely to benefit from this therapeutic approach.

Previously: Using Google Glass to help individuals with autism better understand social cues, Using theater’s sensory experience to help children with autism and “No, I’m not ready yet”: A sister’s translation for her brother with autism
Photo by Wilson X

Immunology, In the News, Parenting, Pediatrics

Ivy and Bean help encourage kids to get vaccinated

Ivy and Bean help encourage kids to get vaccinated

Ivy and Bean2Last week, I took my two little boys to get their shots, including the MMR vaccine that protects against measles, mumps and rubella. Although, as a mom, it’s easy for me to understand the value of vaccines, I’m not sure my preschooler was completely convinced that getting poked in the arm was a great idea.

That’s why I am thrilled to see “Ivy and Bean vs. The Measles,” a set of posters and other educational materials that Sophie Blackall, the illustrator of the popular series of children’s books, has produced in collaboration with the Measles and Rubella Initiative. Blackall’s illustrations show Bean, one of the book’s two heroines, devising a series of unconventional strategies for avoiding the measles: wear a biohazard suit for the rest of your life, get adopted by a polar bear, or (my personal favorite) cover yourself in a 6-inch protective layer of lard.

“Or,” says Ivy, “get vaccinated!”

My son would probably be most interested in Bean’s suggestion to “Move to the moon!” He loves all things outer space-related, and I love the idea of finding something at our doctor’s office that would spark his interest and help me explain to him why he needs that brief poke in the arm.

Bravo, Ivy and Bean!

Via Shots
Previously: Side effects of childhood vaccines are extremely rare, new study finds, Measles is disappearing from the Western hemisphere and Tips for parents on back-to-school vaccinations
Artwork by Sophie Blackall

Behavioral Science, Parenting, Pediatrics, Research, Stanford News

Families can help their teens recover from anorexia, new study shows

Families can help their teens recover from anorexia, new study shows

anorexia-appleUpdated 10-2-14: In a just-published 1:2:1 podcast, Lock discusses this work in depth.

***

9-24-14: A large new study comparing two treatments for anorexia nervosa offers a hopeful message to parents of teens affected by the eating disorder: Families can work with therapists to help their children recover.

The study, which appears today in JAMA Psychiatry and was led by Stanford’s Stewart Agras, MD, was the first large randomized clinical trial to compare two forms of family-based treatment for anorexia. The study included 167 anorexia patients, aged 12 to 18, at six medical centers in the United States and Canada.

In both treatments tested, a trained therapist met regularly with the patient and at least one other member of his or her family. One type of therapy focused on teaching parents how to get their child eating again at home, a method that Agras and Stanford eating disorder expert James Lock, MD, PhD, have researched extensively in the past. The other approach was broader, with the therapist and the family exploring problems in family dynamics and how to solve them. Patients and families in both treatment groups received 16 one-hour therapy sessions over a nine-month period, and patients’ recovery was assessed at the end of the therapy and again one year later.

Both therapies were equally effective in the long run, but the approach that focused on feeding was faster, and patients in that group were hospitalized fewer days during their treatment, which also made this method less expensive. The findings add to a growing list of scientific studies that are changing how physicians think about the families of patients with eating disorders, as our press release explains:

“For a long time, people blamed families for causing anorexia and thought they should be left out of treatment,” said Lock. “But this study suggests that, however you involve them, families can be useful, and that more focused family treatment works faster and more cost-effectively for most patients.” Lock directs the Comprehensive Eating Disorders Program at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford.

The need for good treatments for anorexia in teens is bolstered by prior research demonstrating that the disease becomes more difficult to treat in adulthood, as Agras noted:

“The longer anorexia goes on, the more difficult it is to treat,” he said. “A great many people live chronically restricted lives because of this disease — they plan their days around undereating and overexercise — and quite a few die. The idea is to treat the disorder in adolescence to prevent more adults from becoming anorexic.”

Lock is the c0-author of the book Help Your Teenager Beat an Eating Disorder, which is designed to help parents conduct the feeding-based treatment examined in this study. Lock and Agras have both contributed to textbooks and manuals on eating disorder treatment for health care professionals.

Previously: Stanford study investigates how to prevent moms from passing on eating disorders, A growing consensus for revamping anorexia nervosa treatment and Possible predictors of longer-term recovery from eating disorders
Photo by Santiago Alvarez

Chronic Disease, Medical Education, Medicine X, Mental Health, Parenting, Stanford News

Medicine X explores the relationship between mental and physical health: “I don’t usually talk about this”

Medicine X explores the relationship between mental and physical health: "I don’t usually talk about this"

standing o at MedX - smallThis year, Medicine X examined the relationship between physical and emotional well-being with three breakout panels. Psychologists and ePatients came together in two of the sessions to discuss depression in chronic illness and coping through online communities, as well as the topic of mental health and the whole person.

The conversations centered on five themes: how the uncertainty, fear and overall stress of living with a chronic illness, or being a caregiver, can lead to depression and anxiety; why patients’ desire to be empowered can prevent them from seeking help; why eliminating the stigma associated with mental health conditions is so important; the need to better integrate the training of future doctors and mental-health professionals; and ways patients can identify that they may need mental health services and how to find them.

Ann Becker-Schutte, PhD, a Kansas City-based psychologist who participated in both panels, told the audience, “Living with any of these illnesses, whether it’s rare or well-known, requires a lot of work. There is a burden of gilt, fear and shame that are all rolled into one. It’s not unusual for anyone facing these conditions to get tired and just say ‘I’m done’.”

Sarah Kucharski, a Medicine X ePatient advisor diagnosed with depression, anxiety and fibromuscular dysplasia, gave the audience insight into how depression can take over – explaining that she was shocked to learn during a therapy session that a recent string of major life events (getting married, having bypass surgery and buying a house) had elevated her score on the Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale to roughly 500. “I had no ideas that such things had a rating or that they could be cumulative,” she said. “As a result, I try to be more cognizant and slow down.”

Other ePatients spoke candidly and courageously about some for their darkest moments, with many saying it was challenging to discuss their experiences with depression and anxiety outside their inner circles. ”I don’t usually talk about this,” said Hugo Campos, an ePatient with an implantable cardiac defibrillator in his chest. “This will be particularly difficult to admit in public.”

Campos opened up about the severe depression he encountered during the month following a procedure to implant into his chest a cardiac defibrillator, which shocks the heart to control life-threatening arrhythmias and prevent sudden cardiac arrest. Since the device was implanted preventatively, he felt that by having the surgery he had somehow failed himself and continued to be unsure if the device was necessary. There was also anxiety and fear about the device spontaneously shocking him. He turned to his online community to learn how to cope with these feelings. “I felt I would be better of speaking with my peers online, rather than a professional who did not have an implantable device and didn’t know what I was going through,” he explained.

Scott Strange, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 1970 and also struggles with chronic depression, also turned to the Internet for support. “My journey to acceptance started when I found my online community. Until I found them, I never really faced it.”

Strange talked about growing up with the knowledge that not properly monitoring his glucose and insulin levels could be fatal. He also addressed the shame and exhaustion that results from “busting your rear end and trying to do everything your doctor says” and not seeing an improvement in your health.

While some turned to their patient communities online, others turned to someone outside of their social networks. When the demands of being a caregiver began to overwhelm Erin Moore, the mother of a four-year-old son with cystic fibrosis (CF) and three other children, she opted not to discuss it with someone well-versed with her situation. “Initially I sought help outside of the CF community because I was aware of how many people rely on me for my strength and I didn’t want to admit a weakness.”

Continue Reading »

Parenting, Pediatrics, Public Health, Research

Examining the effects of family time, screen time and parenting styles on child behavior

boardgameAs kids head back to school, many parents may be wondering what they can do to boost their children’s academic achievement. Findings recently published in the Journal of Family Psychology suggest that limiting screen time, increasing family time, and choosing parenting styles that rely on positive reinforcement are among the things that can help children perform better in school.

For The Learning Habit Study, the largest study of its kind, more than 21,000 parents across the country completed a 108-question survey about their children and family life. Among the findings: three family activities – eating regular dinners, attending religious services, and playing board games – were “significantly related to reduced screen time among children, higher GPA, and fewer emotional problems; ” parenting styles involving disciplining children when they misbehave or underperform were associated with a negative impact on children’s academic success, sleep and focus; and students’ sleep quality and grades start to decline after just 45 minutes of screen time.

From a recent WebMD story:

The good news for parents is they can easily make positive changes at home, says Robert Pressman, PhD. He’s the director of research at the New England Center for Pediatric Psychology and the study’s lead author.

Have regular family dinners, for example. They tend to happen at expected times and include conversation and information sharing. Parents can also shift their own habits and parenting styles in response to the study’s findings.

“These are all things that parents can do to make a difference,” Pressman says. “I think it’s going to change everything in terms of how we are going to interact with patients,” he adds. “We have hard data now that we didn’t have before. As a clinician, I know that I will have a greater impact.”

Previously: With school bells ringing, parents should ensure their children are doing enough sleeping, Study: Too much TV, computer could hurt kids’ mental health, Does TV watching, or prolonged sitting, contribute to child obesity rates? and Paper explores effects of electronic media on kids’ health
Photo by woodleywonderworks

Stanford Medicine Resources: