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Health and Fitness, Obesity, Pediatrics, Public Health

Taking breaks for physical activity may benefit children’s long-term health

Taking breaks for physical activity may benefit children’s long-term health

109320999_8b61257d14_zHere’s an eye-opening statistic: Children in the United States spend on average 6 hours per day sitting or reclining. As we head into the fall and winter months, it’s likely that the shorter, darker days and chilly weather will only add to our kids being more sedentary.

National exercise standards advocate for children getting at least 30 minutes of exercise daily to curb the risk of obesity, diabetes and other conditions. But for those days when achieving this goal isn’t possible, new research shows that short activity breaks can help offset a lack of exercise.

In the study (subscription required), researchers invited 28 healthy, normal-weight children to visit the National Institutes of Health on two separate occasions. During the first visit, participants were randomly assigned to two groups. One group watched TV, read or engaged in other sedentary activities for three hours; the other group alternated sitting with three minutes of moderate-intensity walking on a treadmill every 30 minutes for the three-hour period. On the return visit, the children switched groups. Each one took an oral glucose tolerance test at both visits. According to an NIH release:

On the days they walked, the children had blood glucose levels that were, on average, 7 percent lower than on the day they spent all 3 hours sitting. Their insulin levels were 32 percent lower.   Similarly, blood levels of free fatty acids — high levels of which are linked to type 2 diabetes — were also lower, as were levels of C-peptide, an indicator of how hard the pancreas is working to control blood sugar.

After the sessions, the children were allowed to choose their lunch from food items on a buffet table. Based on the nutrient content of each item, the researchers were able to calculate the calorie and nutrient content of what each child ate. The short, moderate-intensity walking sessions did not appear to stimulate the children to eat more than they ordinarily would, as the children consumed roughly the same amounts and kinds of foods after each of the sessions.

The study authors concluded that, if larger studies confirm their findings, interrupting periods of prolonged sitting with regular intervals of moderate-intensity walking might be an effective strategy for reducing children’s risk of diabetes and heart disease.

While regular walking breaks may not excite the average child, three-minute dance parties or stomping on bubbles are other options for getting kids out of their seat and moving.

Previously: Pediatrics group issues new recommendations for building strong bones in kids, Understanding the impact of sedentary behavior on children’s health and British government urging toddlers to ‘get physical’
Photo by Miika Silfverberg

Health Disparities, In the News, Nutrition, Public Health

Turning brown bananas into ice cream: Repurposing surplus food reduces hunger, creates jobs

Turning brown bananas into ice cream: Repurposing surplus food reduces hunger, creates jobs

8421632884_224d355c21_zAccording to a recent report, the United States is one of the most wasteful countries in the world. Up to 40 percent of American food is thrown in the trash, which seems absurd given that food insecurity and hunger are still such problems in this country. Adequate nutrition is a basic for preventing disease and promoting health.

But students at Drexel University are working on improving the situation. They developed a program to use would-be supermarket waste in producing value-added food products. Not only can these products be provided to hungry people, they can be sold back to the supermarket in a mutually-beneficial relationship that could also support new jobs.

The strategy – called a “Food System-Sensitive Methodology”, or FSSM – was developed as part of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Food Recovery Challenge, and is described in a recent Food and Nutrition Sciences article. Drexel culinary arts and food science students decided to reach out to supermarkets because these stores are some of the biggest producers of waste: They throw out produce that is bruised, marked, or misshapen, or remove food simply to make room for fresher shipments. For their pilot project in West Philadelphia, students collected thousands of pounds of fruits and vegetables from local supermarkets and improved their value and palatability by developing recipes in the student-run Drexel Food Lab, a research group that aims to address real-world food issues.

Americans are used to cosmetically pristine produce, and many won’t eat a brown banana even when they’re hungry. Jonathan Deutsch, PhD, director of Drexel University’s Center for Hospitality and Sport Management, explains in a press release how FSSM addresses this: “For example, we took those brown bananas, peeled them, froze them and food processed them to create banana ice cream, which is much more appealing.” Drexel has given facelifts to similarly lackluster items, like canned peas. This requires chefs to think in a new, more sustainable way: Instead of concocting a recipe and then buying ingredients, they must be creative with what’s given to them.

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Aging, Global Health, In the News, Public Health, Research

As life expectancy rises worldwide, many are living longer with illness and disability

10812180384_18496a55f3_zGood news: Average life expectancy has continued to climb over the past two decades. The downside is that those extra years are often marked by chronic disease or disability, according to a new analysis published in the Lancet.

In the study, an international team of researchers examined fatal and nonfatal health loss across countries in an effort to help direct global-health policies to improve longevity and quality of life regardless of where a person lives.

HealthDay reports:

The analysis of data from 188 countries found that life expectancy for both sexes increased from just over 65 years in 1990 to 71.5 years in 2013, while healthy life expectancy rose from almost 57 years to slightly more than 62 years.

“The world has made great progress in health, but now the challenge is to invest in finding more effective ways of preventing or treating the major causes of illness and disability,” study author Theo Vos, a professor at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in Seattle, said in a journal news release.

The rise in overall life expectancy is due to significant declines in illness and death caused by HIV/AIDS and malaria, the researchers said, along with major advances in combating infectious diseases, nutritional deficiencies, and mother and baby health problems.

Earlier this year, Laura Carstensen, PhD, director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, spoke at the Big Data in Biomedicine conference about modern society’s gains in life expectancy and called it an “unprecedented” time in history. During her presentation, she presented data on the current aging population and what aging might look like in the future.

Previously: A look at aging and longevity in this “unprecedented” time in history, “Are we there yet?” Exploring the promise, and the hype, of longevity research and Living loooooooonger: A conversation on longevity
Photo by jennie-o

In the News, Media, Medicine and Society, Public Health, Research, Science

Science for popular audiences is not just “adding to the noise”

Science for popular audiences is not just "adding to the noise"

4787885058_d174638233_zIf you’re reading this blog, chances are you’re a fan of popular science – i.e. scientific research made accessible to people who aren’t professional academics. Many academics, myself included, are also in favor of taking cutting-edge knowledge and sharing it broadly with the public.

But some scientists hesitate to share their work on forums like blogs and other social media. According to a recent SciLogs post, they worry that their knowledge might be wrong or incomplete, be misinterpreted, or just add more static to the internet’s noise. But, as the post lays out, those who think about such things are precisely those who should be publishing for broader audiences. Those who publish misinformation are not stopping to question the quality of the knowledge they broadcast; doubt and the recognition of ignorance are the hallmarks of true scientists. Adding even a small amount of high-quality research to the “science media ecosystem” helps.

Moreover, much of the public seems to have little trust in media, much trust in scientists, and is more receptive to information that acknowledges uncertainty. So bring on the science blogs!

Previously: Can science journals have beautiful prose?, The disturbing trend of science by press release, Science rapper “busts a move” to explain Nobel discovery, Science writer Deborah Blum on blogging: “There were so many smaller stories I wanted to tell” and Veteran blogger offers tips for starting a science blog
Photo by Robin Bray-Hurren

Aging, Podcasts, Public Health, Research, Stanford News

Stanford doctor on a mission to empower patients to talk about end-of-life issues

Stanford doctor on a mission to empower patients to talk about end-of-life issues

Each year, about 2.6 million people die in America. Although past research has shown that 7 out of 10 of us prefer to die at home, an estimated 70 percent of people die in the hospital, nursing home or long-term care facility. The disconnect between where people die and how they would prefer to spend their final days often happens because loved ones and doctors don’t know their end-of-life wishes. Only 20 to 30 percent of Americans have completed advanced directives.

It’s not easy to talk about death, and the terminology used in advanced directives can be confusing. I remember having to complete the form with my husband shortly before the birth of my first child. Despite having been in a relationship for 12 year, we had never discussed end-of-life issues. Imagining the scenarios that might lead to either of us being in a life-threatening situation was an extremely emotional exercise — especially as we awaited our son’s arrival. Did we want doctors to use every intervention possible to save our life? What if it meant sacrificing our quality of life? Did we want to be on life support? If so, how long?

We eventually turned to a friend, who was also a physician, to help us sort through the process. But we didn’t talk to our own primary care doctors and, to this day, our doctors have never asked us if we have an advance directive or about our end-of-life preferences. And this isn’t unusual. Recent research from VJ Periyakoil, MD, director of Stanford’s Palliative Care Education and Training, shows that most doctors struggle to talk with patients about what’s important to them in their final days, particularly if the patient’s ethnicity is different than their own.

In the latest 1:2:1 podcast, Periyakoil discusses her study findings and why it’s critical for all adults to complete an advance directive and initiate a conversation about their end-of-life wishes with their doctor and family. To get these conversations started and help patients navigate the emotionally-charged process, she launched the Stanford Letter Project, which provides templates in a range of languages asking patients simple questions about how they want to die.

Listen to the full podcast to learn more about the project and hear from Stanford Letter Project users about how they want to spend their final days.

Previously: How would you like to die? Tell your doctor in a letterIn honor of National Healthcare Decisions Day: A reminder for patients to address end-of-life issues, Study: Doctors would choose less aggressive end-of-life care for themselves and On a mission to transform end-of-life care

Medical Education, Microbiology, NIH, Public Health, Research, Videos

Investigating the human microbiome: “We’re only just beginning and there is so much more to explore”

Investigating the human microbiome: "We’re only just beginning and there is so much more to explore"

The more scientists learn about the body’s community of bacteria, the more they believe that the human microbiome plays an important role in our overall health. For example, research published earlier this week suggests that a specific pattern of high bacterial diversity in the vagina during pregnancy increases a woman’s risk of giving birth prematurely.

Despite these and other insightful findings, researchers have a long way to go to understand the composition of our internal microbial ecosystems. As Keisha Findley, a postdoctoral fellow at the National Human Genome Research Institute says in the above video, “We’re only just beginning and there is so much more to explore.”

Findley and colleagues are working to survey all of the fungi and bacteria living on healthy human skin and develop a baseline to determine how these microbial communities may influence skin conditions such as acne, athlete’s foot, skin ulcers and eczema. Watch the LabTV video above to learn more about her work.

Previously: Drugs for bugs: Industry seeks small molecules to target, tweak and tune up our gut microbes, A look at our disappearing microbes, Exploring the microbes that inhabit our bodies and Diverse microbes discovered in healthy lungs shed new light on cystic fibrosis
Via NIH Director’s Blog

Global Health, Medical Education, Medicine and Society, Patient Care, Public Health

Exploring the benefits of pursuing anthropology and medicine

Exploring the benefits of pursuing anthropology and medicine

3470650293_60b27d6539_zAs a PhD student in medical anthropology, and having come from a very “medical family,” pursuing an MD has been a kind of shadow-dream of mine. For a year or two in high school, I was convinced that neonatology was the path for me; now I’m a doula and research the culture of childbirth.

Some people do live the double dream, and I recently interviewed two of them: Jenny Miao Hua at the University of Chicago and Rosalind Franklin University’s Chicago Medical School, and Stanford’s Amrapali Maitra, both of whom are medical anthropologists pursuing PhD/MD degrees. (Amrapali has brought an anthropological perspective to Scope through our SMS Unplugged series.)

The two came to their joint degree from different sides: Hua was an anthropology student interested in Chinese medicine and the body, while Maitra was enrolled in medical school and became serious about understanding the social context of illness. Each intends to pursue internal medicine, and each, incidentally, has family connections in the site she chose to research. We talked shop for quite a while, and what I found most interesting was their thoughts on what anthropology brings to clinical practice:

Maitra: On the broadest level, anthropology gives you an immense empathy for your patients and allows you to see them as people. It sounds cliché, but with the focus on efficiency and evidence-based medicine that has taken over American biomedical practice, even the most kind and caring individual can lose [his or her] empathy. And the kind of empathy you get from anthropology is not just sympathizing with the person, but really understanding where they’re coming from, historically and because of their life position: why they live in a certain neighborhood or have a certain diet. It allows you to think creatively about what they’re able to do or not do in pursuing their own health.

Hua: With anthropological training, students understand the various ways pathologies are dependent on larger socioeconomic forces. As a practicing physician, the person who comes through the door is never a textbook patient, so within a very short amount of time you have to pick up on this deep history, and when you’re not careful you end up stereotyping and profiling. Anthropology brings a more nuanced way of thinking about patients: they’re not just uniform biological entities, but hybrids of biology, society, and culture.

Maitra: I’ve seen so many clinic visits where I can tell, as the anthropologist in the room, that the attending physician and patient just have completely different agendas. There are simple questions like those Arthur Kleinman has laid out, asking what about the pain bothers her, why she thinks she’s having it, what she hopes to get out of the encounter. I see some doctors use these, and their visits go so much better. They’re able to build an alliance with their patient that’s very therapeutic.

That’s anthropology on the individual level, but on another level it allows you to recognize that certain things are trends. It allows you to think systematically about different kinds of structural violence. For example, why is it that so many people whose occupation is picking strawberries come in with knee and back pain issues? Treating pain is not going to solve the problem. It’s about getting to the root of the occupational hazards of being a farm worker.

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Addiction, In the News, Myths, Patient Care, Public Health, Public Safety

“24/7 Sobriety” program may offer a simple fix for drunken driving

"24/7 Sobriety" program may offer a simple fix for drunken driving

8684229367_2826035583_zEvery now and then I read a story that takes what I think I know about a certain topic and turns it upside down. Today, my understanding of programs to reduce drunk driving were upended by an article written by Keith Humphreys, PhD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at Stanford.

As Humphreys explains, many people mistakenly believe that no one can overcome a drinking problem without treatment involving a professional’s help. This, he says, is a myth, and the success of the “24/7 Sobriety” program highlights the importance of exploring and adopting new ways to combat drunken driving. From the Wall Street Journal article:

Offenders in 24/7 Sobriety can drive all they want to, but they are under a court order not to drink. Every morning and evening, for an average of five months, they visit a police facility to take a breathalyzer test. Unlike most consequences imposed by the criminal justice system, the penalties for noncompliance are swift, certain and modest. Drinking results in mandatory arrest, with a night or two in jail as the typical penalty.

The results have been stunning. Since 2005, the program has administered more than 7 million breathalyzer tests to over 30,000 participants. Offenders have both showed up and passed the test at a rate of over 99%.

Counties that used the 24/7 Sobriety program also had a 12% decrease in repeat drunken-driving arrests and a 9% drop in domestic-violence arrests, according to a 2013 study.

A possible reason why this program works — when attempts to help people with drinking problems often fail — is that the twice daily breathalyzer tests have immediate consequences, Humphreys explains. “It turns out that people with drug and alcohol problems are just like the rest of us. Their behavior is affected much more by what is definitely going to happen today than by what might or might not happen far in the future, even if the potential future consequences are more serious.”

Previously: Can the “24/7 sobriety” model reduce drunken disorderly conduct and violence in London?Alcoholism: Not just a man’s problem and Stopping criminal men from drinking reduces domestic violence
Photo by: KOMUnews

Behavioral Science, Mental Health, NIH, Public Health, Research

Developing certain skills may help you cultivate a positive outlook

34835574_9e61cfe6bb_zMany of us have heard that having a positive outlook on life can improve our mental and physical health. Yet, if you’re like me, you’ve noticed that it can be hard to focus on the bright side of things when you’re feeling anything but positive.

That’s why I was drawn to this article in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) newsletter. It discusses several NIH-funded studies on the topic and explains what it means to have a positive outlook and how a positive mood can affect your health. The really helpful information, from my perspective, is it also explains how developing certain skills, like meditation and self-reflection, can make you can feel more positive more often. From the NIH story:

Having a positive outlook doesn’t mean you never feel negative emotions, such as sadness or anger, says Dr. Barbara L. Fredrickson, a psychologist and expert on emotional wellness at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. “All emotions—whether positive or negative—are adaptive in the right circumstances. The key seems to be finding a balance between the two,” she says.

The research teams used a variety of techniques to learn about the underlying mechanisms of positive and negative emotions and what it is that enables people to bounce back from difficult times.

Among those who appear more resilient and better able to hold on to positive emotions are people who’ve practiced various forms of meditation. In fact, growing evidence suggests that several techniques—including meditation, cognitive therapy (a type of psychotherapy), and self-reflection (thinking about the things you find important)—can help people develop the skills needed to make positive, healthful changes.

“Research points to the importance of certain kinds of training that can alter brain circuits in a way that will promote positive responses,” Davidson says. “It’s led us to conclude that well-being can be considered as a life skill. If you practice, you can actually get better at it.”

Previously: Navigating a rare genetic disorder with a positive attitudePromoting healthy eating and a positive body image on college campusesWhen life gives you lemons: Study suggests the benefits of a positive outlook are context dependent and The power of positive moods in improving cognitive function among older adults
Photo by: premasagar

Cardiovascular Medicine, Medical Apps, Public Health, Research, Stanford News

Stanford’s MyHeart Counts app reaches overseas to Hong Kong and the UK

Stanford's MyHeart Counts app reaches overseas to Hong Kong and the UK

MyHeart Counts on phoneIn an effort to continue signing up new participants for their heart research study at groundbreaking speeds, researchers at Stanford launched their iPhone app MyHeart Counts overseas in Hong Kong and the United Kingdom today. The goal is to reach out far and wide — quickly.

To date, about 41,000 users have signed up for the free app launched in March, which allows users to learn about their own heart health while also participating in a large-scale heart study. That’s an unprecedented number of people in such a short amount of time, researchers say, adding that it’s only the beginning. From our press release on today’s launch overseas:

“The idea is to move into one country at a time until we go global,” said Euan Ashley MD, a professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford and co-investigator for the MyHeart Counts study. “We hope to add more countries every few months.

“We are ready to take the study as far as it will go. We would like to build a new Framingham heart study for the ages,” Ashley said, referring to the long-term cardiovascular study that has followed three generations of participants in Framingham, Massachusetts. “We would like millions of participants.”

MyHeart Counts is the first of the initial handful of apps designed using ResearchKit, Apple’s open-source software platform for creating medical-research apps, to expand overseas. Along with its reach into Hong Kong and the U.K., the app is also being upgraded today, providing more information to users about their own heart health and breaking heart health news. The press release gives a brief overview of what the app does:

The free app offers users a simple way to participate in the study, complete tasks and answer surveys from their iPhones. Once every three months, participants are asked to monitor one week’s worth of physical activity, complete a 6-minute walk fitness test if they are able, and enter their risk-factor information. The app now also delivers a comprehensive summary of each user’s heart health and areas for improvement.

Previously: Lights, camera action: Stanford cardiologist discusses MyHeart Counts on ABC’s NightlineBuild it (an easy way to join research studies) and the volunteers will comeMyHeart Counts app debuts with a splash and Stanford launches iPhone app to study heart health

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