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Health Disparities, Medicine and Society, Parenting, Pediatrics, Public Health, Stanford News

Stanford med student helps turn pediatrics waiting room into a center for school-readiness

Stanford med student helps turn pediatrics waiting room into a center for school-readiness


For many low-income children, a pediatrician is the only professional they interact with before they start kindergarten. This fact inspired Jecca Steinberg, a second-year Stanford medical student and Schweitzer Fellow, to think about how that interaction could improve these children’s school readiness, which often lags behind that of their peers. If these kids could be equally well-prepared for kindergarten, their potential for economic mobility would skyrocket.

Now, in an innovative collaborative effort, the pediatrics waiting room of Fair Oaks Health Center in Redwood City, Calif. is being turned into a learning center. According to previous research conducted by the Stanford Pediatric Advocacy Program, the clinic’s patient population includes more than 900 low-income children between the ages of 2 and 5; surveys indicate that only 31 percent participated in any kind of formal pre-school education and 82 percent were not school-ready by kindergarten.

In collaboration with Neel Patel, MD, the medical director at the clinic, Steinberg reached out to Stanford art practice lecturer Lauren Toomer, MFA, who volunteered her time and talent to produce a mural that will transform the drab waiting room into a space for learning opportunities. The mural incorporates letters, numbers, shapes, and images of the Redwood City community, as well as three interactive learning panels. Patel generously donated the funds for the supplies. See the prototype above; the actual mural will be finished by early October.

In a recent phone conversation, Steinberg explained to me that the mural project is one component of a larger project called Kinder Ready, which is part of Stanford’s Pediatric Advocacy Program led by Lisa Chamberlain, MD, MPH, and Janine Bruce, DrPH. (The work at Fair Oaks Clinic has been led by Stanford pediatrics residents Jaime Peterson, MD, and Ashley Case McClary, MD.) I asked her more about their efforts:

How did you get involved in this work?

I’d say my entire motivation for entering the field of medicine is centered on providing opportunities for socioeconomic mobility, and although health is an incredibly important aspect of that, it can’t be viewed in a vacuum as a solution. So these interdisciplinary efforts touch on everything I’m passionate about. For my first-year Stanford Medical Scholars research project, called community based participatory research, I set up a series of focus groups with low-income parents to talk to them about their conceptions of school readiness: what they think a role of a parent is, and how they think a pediatrician could help them.

Currently I help screen children for their school-readiness level, and I work with the parents to teach them different activities that they can do at home to promote their children learning. I’ve been working with Dr. Patel to include activities and interventions in well-child visits that parents can take home with them. We set them up with library cards, let them know about parent-child reading hours and mommy-and-me classes in the community, and make it easier to get a hold of books and other learning materials.

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Medicine and Literature, Podcasts, Public Health, Science

Jonas Salk: A life

Jonas Salk: A life

Salk book coverIn 1954, Charlotte DeCroes stood in line with her fellow second graders in Kingsport, Tennessee and received the polio vaccine. Her Tennessee hometown was one of the test sites for what was then the largest and most significant clinical trial in the history of medicine. By the end of 1953, there were 35,968 reported polio cases, and the United States was desperate to solve this devastating illness. A survey at the time ranked fear of polio second only to fear of atomic warfare.

Fast forward to 2015. Charlotte Jacobs, MD, professor of medicine, emerita at Stanford, has written a highly acclaimed biography of the famed researcher/physician Jonas Salk, MD, who developed the polio vaccine. In this 1:2:1 podcast, she told me that her ten-year journey into Salk’s life was instigated partly because she couldn’t find a thorough autobiography on him, something she considered a historical lapse.

Jacobs has written a finely honed and balanced portrait – saluting Salk’s great accomplishment while not flinching from describing a man who was enigmatic, complex and all too human. She conducted more than a hundred personal interviews and spoke to two of his three sons along with his longtime private secretary. The dichotomies of his life are fascinating. While he was loved and lauded by the public and the media, he was a pariah in the scientific community – never appreciated, accepted or awarded. (His scientific colleagues thought he was a press hound, an impression that was fueled by the media’s adoring gaze – covers and feature articles in the most popular media of the time, including Life, Time, Colliers, Consumer Reports, Popular Mechanics and U.S. News and World Report.)

Today, with vaccine wars sweeping certain areas of the country, Jacobs reminds us of a time when a major public-health crisis engulfed the nation and of a hero who made a difference and changed the landscape of medical history. It’s worth remembering.

Previously: Charlotte Jacobs on finding “snippets during every day” to balance careers in medicine and literatureStanford doctor-author brings historic figure Jonas Salk to life and Prescribing a story? Medicine meets literature in “narrative medicine”

Infectious Disease, Public Health, Research, Stanford News

Hikers beware: New tick-borne disease discovered in Northern California parks

Hikers beware: New tick-borne disease discovered in Northern California parks

dan with wood rat 3Meet Dan Salkeld, PhD, a disease ecologist and friend, shown here looking for ticks on a wood rat from the San Francisco Bay Area. According to Popular Science, he has one of the worst jobs in science: tick collecting.

But thanks to the nitpicky diligence of Salkeld and co-author Eric Lambin, PhD, a senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, Bay Area residents now know that getting sick from a tick bite is a real and present danger — in a recent study published in PLoS One, the researchers found that 10.6 percent of young nymph ticks and 8.1 percent of adult ticks harbored the disease-causing bacteria Borrelia miyamotoi and/or Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. (See map below for tick collection areas.)

“We continue to be surprised by the number of ticks carrying Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia miyamotoi throughout the Bay Area, and we believe more research into the connections between human disease and strains and species of bacteria is critical,” said Salkeld. “It was astonishing that we could see such variety in tick ecology, ranging from low tick infection risk on one trail to high tick infection risk on another trail in the same park.”

First discovered in the United States in 2013, the most extensive analysis of Borrelia miyamotoi infections in U.S. residents was published in the July issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. In this study, 51 patients from the Northeast were found to be “frequently very ill” with fever, headache (often severe), muscle pain, fatigue and joint pain. Almost one quarter of the patients required hospitalization. The researchers also found that the miyamotoi infections were not reliably detected by the standard two-tiered Lyme blood test and these patients didn’t develop the hallmark sign of Lyme disease, the bullseye rash.

“This research offers some insights into the complexity of diagnosing patients with tick-borne diseases, and the need for medical professionals to be alert to the different symptoms of this newly discovered infection,” said Linda Giampa, executive director, of the Bay Area Lyme Foundation, which funded this study.

The Bay Area Lyme Foundation also funds a number of projects at Stanford’s Lyme Disease Working Group, which is exploring ways to improve diagnostic tests, evaluate the effectiveness of innovative therapies, expand clinical services and build greater public awareness of tick-borne diseases.


Previously: Stanford study finds Lyme disease among ticks in California parksAdd a tick check to your vacation checklistPiecing together the clues: Diagnosing and treating autonomic disorders
Photo courtesy of Bay Area Lyme Foundation; map from PLoS One

Patient Care, Pediatrics, Public Health, Stanford News, Surgery

Story highlights teens’ life-changing weight loss

Story highlights teens' life-changing weight loss

Over on the Healthy, Happier Lives blog today: A look at how bariatric surgery, combined with a strict diet plan and exercise regime, benefited two San Jose, Calif. teens. The siblings lost a combined total of more than 200 pounds and in the process have reduced their risk of obesity-related medical complications and improved their quality of life. “It’s been a life-changing transformation,” Sophia Yen, MD, an adolescent medicine specialist with Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, commented.

Previously: The challenges of dieting and the promises of bariatric surgery and Bariatric surgery may help protect teen patients’ hearts

Mental Health, Pediatrics, Public Health, Stanford News

Stanford psychiatrist: It’s my “mission to help people develop to their full potential”

Carrion talking to patientHow can a person fully develop his or her potential, regardless of life circumstances? This is the question that brought Stanford child and adolescent psychiatrist Victor Carrion, MD, to his work on child anxiety and mood disorders. Carrion, who also directs the Stanford Early Life Stress and Pediatric Anxiety Research Program at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, just won the Silicon Valley Business Journal‘s Excellence in Healthcare award for his dedication to this question.

In an article describing this honor, Carrion says he’s always wanted to go into medicine and explore human behavior. While he’s very proud of the advances his lab has made in understanding the impact of early life stress on behavior, he also notes that there remain significant barriers to mental health in the region, including stigma and accessibility of treatment.

One of the innovative programs Carrion has been involved in is a study on the effectiveness of a health and wellness program in the Ravenswood City School District in East Palo Alto. The program teaches kids about mindfulness and positive habits that encourage calm, focused attitudes; Carrion and his colleagues will follow student participants over the next four years, tracking cognitive function, academic strengths and weaknesses, behavior, and stress-related hormone levels.

Previously: Stanford researchers use yoga to help underserve youth manage stress and gain focusProlonged fatigue and mood disorders among teensYoga classes may boost high school students’ mental well-beingLucile Packard Children’s Hospital partners with high schools on student mental health programs and More evidence that chronic stress may increase children’s risk of obesity
Photo courtesy of Stanford Medicine News

In the News, Parenting, Patient Care, Pregnancy, Public Health, Women's Health

Low-tech yet essential: Why parents are vital members of care teams for premature babies

Low-tech yet essential: Why parents are vital members of care teams for premature babies

3297657033_081d4f3630_zThanks to recent advances in medicine, technology and research, most premature babies born in the United States face better odds of surviving than ever before. Yet, the number of premature births in the U.S. remains relatively high, with a rate that’s on par with that of Somalia, Thailand and Turkey.

For the parents of a premature baby, an early birth can transform what was supposed to be a happy event into a stressful one, says Henry Lee, MD, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. In a recent U.S. News & World Report article penned by Lee, he discusses why it’s important for parents, and beneficial for the baby, when parents are active members of the child’s medical team:

Giving birth to a preemie, especially when it’s unexpected, leaves many parents feeling unprepared and helpless. But we make it clear very early. “You, the parent, are a critical part of our medical team.” That’s right. Even in the heart of Silicon Valley where we’re located, two of our biggest assets are decidedly low-tech workers: the baby’s mom and dad.

Including parents in the care of preemies is a standard that was unheard of in the early days of neonatology, but is now used in leading NICUs for one critical reason: It works.

Here’s an example of how parents contribute. Studies have shown that skin-to-skin care, also known as kangaroo care, can have beneficial effects on preterm neonates, including improved temperature and heart rate stability. In many NICUs, you will see babies – clad only in a diaper and covered by a blanket – placed prone position on the chest of either the mother or the father. This intimate method of care provides a preterm baby a natural environment for rest, growth and healing.

No matter when a baby is born, term or preterm, families know their children best. A parent’s contribution is critical to treating these most vulnerable of newborns.

Previously: How Stanford researchers are working to understand the complexities of preterm birthNew research center aims to understand premature birth and A look at the world’s smallest preterm babies
Photo by Sarah Hopkins

Pediatrics, Public Health

Back to school = back to the doctor

Back to school = back to the doctor

IMG_4070Many kids head back to school today; others, including my own, already have several days or weeks under their belt. Wherever your child is in the academic year, it’s not too late to schedule a back-to-school check-up with their doctor – a message relayed to readers in a recent Healthier, Happier Lives Blog post:

“For a lot of families, the yearly physical is the only time they come into our office because their children are generally healthy otherwise,” said Christianne Strickland, MD, a Stanford Children’s Health pediatrician…

The exam begins with checking a patient’s vital signs, height and weight, progress on the growth chart, and hearing and vision tests. Pediatricians like Strickland, or South Bascom colleagues Patricia Ferrari, MD, and Mary Beth Hughes, MD, also discuss immunization schedules with parents. If vaccines are warranted, they are administered after the exam.

“Back-to-school appointments allow us to take a complete history of the patient, which down the line helps us when they do come in with an illness,” said Strickland. “We make sure they are growing properly and don’t have physical problems that perhaps weren’t detected by the parents. The physical exam is really about preventative medicine.”

In the piece, Strickland also provides a few practical tips regarding screen-time and exercise (the importance of which was just discussed here on Friday.)

Previously: Tips for parents on back-to-school vaccinations
Photo by Michelle Brandt

Health and Fitness, Obesity, Pediatrics, Public Health

Taking breaks for physical activity may benefit children’s long-term health

Taking breaks for physical activity may benefit children’s long-term health

109320999_8b61257d14_zHere’s an eye-opening statistic: Children in the United States spend on average 6 hours per day sitting or reclining. As we head into the fall and winter months, it’s likely that the shorter, darker days and chilly weather will only add to our kids being more sedentary.

National exercise standards advocate for children getting at least 30 minutes of exercise daily to curb the risk of obesity, diabetes and other conditions. But for those days when achieving this goal isn’t possible, new research shows that short activity breaks can help offset a lack of exercise.

In the study (subscription required), researchers invited 28 healthy, normal-weight children to visit the National Institutes of Health on two separate occasions. During the first visit, participants were randomly assigned to two groups. One group watched TV, read or engaged in other sedentary activities for three hours; the other group alternated sitting with three minutes of moderate-intensity walking on a treadmill every 30 minutes for the three-hour period. On the return visit, the children switched groups. Each one took an oral glucose tolerance test at both visits. According to an NIH release:

On the days they walked, the children had blood glucose levels that were, on average, 7 percent lower than on the day they spent all 3 hours sitting. Their insulin levels were 32 percent lower.   Similarly, blood levels of free fatty acids — high levels of which are linked to type 2 diabetes — were also lower, as were levels of C-peptide, an indicator of how hard the pancreas is working to control blood sugar.

After the sessions, the children were allowed to choose their lunch from food items on a buffet table. Based on the nutrient content of each item, the researchers were able to calculate the calorie and nutrient content of what each child ate. The short, moderate-intensity walking sessions did not appear to stimulate the children to eat more than they ordinarily would, as the children consumed roughly the same amounts and kinds of foods after each of the sessions.

The study authors concluded that, if larger studies confirm their findings, interrupting periods of prolonged sitting with regular intervals of moderate-intensity walking might be an effective strategy for reducing children’s risk of diabetes and heart disease.

While regular walking breaks may not excite the average child, three-minute dance parties or stomping on bubbles are other options for getting kids out of their seat and moving.

Previously: Pediatrics group issues new recommendations for building strong bones in kids, Understanding the impact of sedentary behavior on children’s health and British government urging toddlers to ‘get physical’
Photo by Miika Silfverberg

Health Disparities, In the News, Nutrition, Public Health

Turning brown bananas into ice cream: Repurposing surplus food reduces hunger, creates jobs

Turning brown bananas into ice cream: Repurposing surplus food reduces hunger, creates jobs

8421632884_224d355c21_zAccording to a recent report, the United States is one of the most wasteful countries in the world. Up to 40 percent of American food is thrown in the trash, which seems absurd given that food insecurity and hunger are still such problems in this country. Adequate nutrition is a basic for preventing disease and promoting health.

But students at Drexel University are working on improving the situation. They developed a program to use would-be supermarket waste in producing value-added food products. Not only can these products be provided to hungry people, they can be sold back to the supermarket in a mutually-beneficial relationship that could also support new jobs.

The strategy – called a “Food System-Sensitive Methodology”, or FSSM – was developed as part of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Food Recovery Challenge, and is described in a recent Food and Nutrition Sciences article. Drexel culinary arts and food science students decided to reach out to supermarkets because these stores are some of the biggest producers of waste: They throw out produce that is bruised, marked, or misshapen, or remove food simply to make room for fresher shipments. For their pilot project in West Philadelphia, students collected thousands of pounds of fruits and vegetables from local supermarkets and improved their value and palatability by developing recipes in the student-run Drexel Food Lab, a research group that aims to address real-world food issues.

Americans are used to cosmetically pristine produce, and many won’t eat a brown banana even when they’re hungry. Jonathan Deutsch, PhD, director of Drexel University’s Center for Hospitality and Sport Management, explains in a press release how FSSM addresses this: “For example, we took those brown bananas, peeled them, froze them and food processed them to create banana ice cream, which is much more appealing.” Drexel has given facelifts to similarly lackluster items, like canned peas. This requires chefs to think in a new, more sustainable way: Instead of concocting a recipe and then buying ingredients, they must be creative with what’s given to them.

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Aging, Global Health, In the News, Public Health, Research

As life expectancy rises worldwide, many are living longer with illness and disability

10812180384_18496a55f3_zGood news: Average life expectancy has continued to climb over the past two decades. The downside is that those extra years are often marked by chronic disease or disability, according to a new analysis published in the Lancet.

In the study, an international team of researchers examined fatal and nonfatal health loss across countries in an effort to help direct global-health policies to improve longevity and quality of life regardless of where a person lives.

HealthDay reports:

The analysis of data from 188 countries found that life expectancy for both sexes increased from just over 65 years in 1990 to 71.5 years in 2013, while healthy life expectancy rose from almost 57 years to slightly more than 62 years.

“The world has made great progress in health, but now the challenge is to invest in finding more effective ways of preventing or treating the major causes of illness and disability,” study author Theo Vos, a professor at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in Seattle, said in a journal news release.

The rise in overall life expectancy is due to significant declines in illness and death caused by HIV/AIDS and malaria, the researchers said, along with major advances in combating infectious diseases, nutritional deficiencies, and mother and baby health problems.

Earlier this year, Laura Carstensen, PhD, director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, spoke at the Big Data in Biomedicine conference about modern society’s gains in life expectancy and called it an “unprecedented” time in history. During her presentation, she presented data on the current aging population and what aging might look like in the future.

Previously: A look at aging and longevity in this “unprecedented” time in history, “Are we there yet?” Exploring the promise, and the hype, of longevity research and Living loooooooonger: A conversation on longevity
Photo by jennie-o

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