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Older people are more susceptible to infection, cancer, and autoimmunity than younger people. This may be the result of our immune cells' receiving increasingly random marching orders as we age.

Older people are more susceptible to infection, cancer, and autoimmunity than younger people. This may be the result of our immune cells' receiving increasingly random marching orders as we age.

A biobank from the U.K. releases hundreds of thousands of anonymized medical records and genetic data to scientists, who used it to track down new links between genetics and disease.

A biobank from the U.K. releases hundreds of thousands of anonymized medical records and genetic data to scientists, who used it to track down new links between genetics and disease.

In a proof-of-principle study, Stanford scientists and colleagues used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to modify genes in coral, suggesting that the tool could one day aid conservation efforts.

In a proof-of-principle study, Stanford scientists and colleagues used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to modify genes in coral, suggesting that the tool could one day aid conservation efforts.

In this video, Stanford Medicine heart surgeon Joseph Woo discusses his award-winning research that examined the pros of cons of mechanical versus biological valve replacements.

In this video, Stanford Medicine heart surgeon Joseph Woo discusses his award-winning research that examined the pros of cons of mechanical versus biological valve replacements.

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When associated with tumors, immune cells known as macrophages can be both good and bad: they can help cancer spread and curb its growth.

When associated with tumors, immune cells known as macrophages can be both good and bad: they can help cancer spread and curb its growth.

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In an interview in the journal Neuron, Stanford's Rob Malenka holds forth on a wide range of subjects stretching from reflections on his own career trajectory to his approach to boosting those of his trainees to the future of neuroscience itself.

In an interview in the journal Neuron, Stanford's Rob Malenka holds forth on a wide range of subjects stretching from reflections on his own career trajectory to his approach to boosting those of his trainees to the future of neuroscience itself.

In one of the largest observational studies on fitness and heart disease, researchers examined found that people with higher levels of grip strength, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness had reduced risks of heart attacks and stroke.

In one of the largest observational studies on fitness and heart disease, researchers examined found that people with higher levels of grip strength, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness had reduced risks of heart attacks and stroke.

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Liver cells expressing high levels of telomerase – a protein normally associated with resistance to aging and implicated in cancers and stem cell maintenance – are necessary to regenerate the organ after normal cell turnover or in response to damage.

Liver cells expressing high levels of telomerase – a protein normally associated with resistance to aging and implicated in cancers and stem cell maintenance – are necessary to regenerate the organ after normal cell turnover or in response to damage.

Can computers carry out hospital safety-monitoring tasks better than humans? A Stanford research team has been testing the idea; so far, it's working well.

Can computers carry out hospital safety-monitoring tasks better than humans? A Stanford research team has been testing the idea; so far, it's working well.

Facebook prohibits paid tobacco advertising, but Stanford researchers found brands and vendors marketing their products through unpaid content, in apparent conflict with the rules or their spirit.

Facebook prohibits paid tobacco advertising, but Stanford researchers found brands and vendors marketing their products through unpaid content, in apparent conflict with the rules or their spirit.

Inspired by family members to pursue a science career, Stanford's Karen Parker is working to better understand the biological basis of social functioning as related to autism.

Inspired by family members to pursue a science career, Stanford's Karen Parker is working to better understand the biological basis of social functioning as related to autism.

Future physicians may one day be practicing more as overseers rather than decision makers, argues Stanford medical student Steven Zhang.

Future physicians may one day be practicing more as overseers rather than decision makers, argues Stanford medical student Steven Zhang.

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