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Emergency Medicine, Pregnancy, Research, Surgery, Videos

Self-propelled powder moves against blood flow to staunch bleeding in hard-to-reach areas

Self-propelled powder moves against blood flow to staunch bleeding in hard-to-reach areas

If you nick your skin, it’s easy to stop the bleeding by applying a coagulant powder directly to the cut. Yet, bleeding wounds inside the body are beyond the reach of such blood-stopping powders.

Now, Christian Kastrup, PhD, an assistant professor at the University of British Columbia, and a team of researchers, biochemical engineers and emergency physicians, have developed a way to clot internal wounds by creating a self-propelled powder that moves against the flow of blood.

“Bleeding is the number one killer of young people, and maternal death from postpartum hemorrhage can be as high as one in 50 births in low resource settings so these are extreme problems,” Kastrup explained in a UBC press release. “People have developed hundreds of agents that can clot blood but the issue is that it’s hard to push these therapies against severe blood flow, especially far enough upstream to reach the leaking vessels. Here, for the first time, we’ve come up with an agent that can do that.”

To give blood-clotting powder a push, Kastrup and his colleagues added calcium carbonate to the coagulant powder. The carbonate forms porous micro-particles that latch onto the clotting agent (tranexamic acid). As the particles release carbon dioxide gas, fizzing and moving like mini-antacid tablets, they launch the clotting agent toward the source of bleeding.

More rigorous testing and development needs to be done before this agent is ready for use in humans, as the press release and study explain. But it’s possible that in the near future this powder could be used to treat otherwise unreachable cuts such as those in postpartum hemorrhages, sinus operations and internal combat wounds.

Previously: New obstetric hemorrhage tool kit released todayIn poorest countries, increase in midwives could save lives of mothers and their babiesTeen benefited by Stanford surgeon’s passion for trauma care
Video courtesy of UBC

Research, Science, Stanford News

How Bio-X is fueling the #NextGreatDiscovery

How Bio-X is fueling the #NextGreatDiscovery


The videos, images and stories of #NextGreatDiscovery share two things in common: 1) They reveal the lives and motivations of amazing scientists carrying out basic research, and 2) All the scientists are affiliated with Stanford’s pioneering interdisciplinary institute Bio-X.

Almost 15 years ago, Stanford Bio-X was founded to support biomedical research with an interdisciplinary blend of X, which is to say all the fields across the street from Stanford University School of Medicine – engineering, chemistry, physics, biology, math and statistics as well as the professional schools of business, law and education. Bio-X later came to be housed in the Clark Center, located with crosswalks linking those schools and departments.

Two of the scientists featured in #NextGreatDiscovery recently won Nobel prizes in chemistry, and both discuss the importance of Stanford’s collaborative spirit in their research.

From Michael Levitt, PhD:

The university has the medical school and other departments very close to each other. This means that you can mix together all the sciences whether it is engineering and medicine, mathematics and medicine, statistics and medicine. All of these things are really close together so people are able to interact, groups are able to mix. I think it really is a remarkable environment.

From W.E. Moerner, PhD:

One aspect of research today is that our science has become more and more multidisciplinary. Exciting science occurs at the boundaries between conventional disciplines. Here at Stanford we have a spectacular environment for multidisciplinary work. That’s because in a very close proximity we have all of the humanities and sciences departments, the medical school departments and the engineering departments all close together, essentially across the street from one another right here close to my office.

In the series, scientists discuss the importance of funding for the basic sciences, as federal sources become more scarce. Both Levitt and Moerner have received Seed funding through Bio-X, which support new collaborations between scientists bridging disciplines. These grants are critical for promoting interdisciplinary research through funding at a time when federal resources for early stage collaborations are hard to come by, even for scientists whose research receives a nod from Stockholm.

Previously: #NextGreatDiscovery: Exploring the important work of basic scientists, The value of exploring jellyfish eyes: Scientist-penned book supports “curiosity-driven” research, Basic research underlies effort to thwart “greatest threat to face humanity”For third year in row, a Stanford faculty member wins the Nobel Prize in Chemistry and Stanford’s Michael Levitt wins 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Photo by Peter van Agtmael/Magnum Photos

Addiction, Behavioral Science, Genetics, Neuroscience, Research, Stanford News

Found: a novel assembly line in brain whose product may prevent alcoholism

Found: a novel assembly line in brain whose product may prevent alcoholism

alcohol silhouette

High-functioning binge drinkers can seem charming and stylish. The ultimate case in point: Nick and Nora of the famed Thirties/Forties “Thin Man” film series (you can skip the ad after the first few seconds).

But alcoholism’s terrific toll is better sighted on city streets than in celluloid skyscraper scenarios. At least half of all homeless people suffer from dependence on one or another addictive drug. (My Stanford Medicine article “The Neuroscience of Need” explores the physiology of addiction.) Alcohol, the most commonly abused of them all (not counting nicotine), has proved to be a particularly hard one to shake.

Alcoholism is an immense national and international health problem,” I wrote the other day in a news release explaining an exciting step toward a possible cure:

More than 200 million people globally, including 18 million Americans, suffer from it. Binge drinking [roughly four drinks in a single session for a man, five for a woman] substantially increases the likelihood of developing alcoholism. As many as one in four American adults report having engaged in binge drinking in the past month.

While there are a few approved drugs that induce great discomfort when a person uses them drinks alcohol, reduce its pleasant effects, or alleviate some of its unpleasant ones, there’s as of yet no “magic bullet” medication that eliminates the powerful cravings driving the addictive behavior to begin with.

But a study, just published in Science, by Stanford neuroscientist Jun Ding, PhD, and his associates, may be holding the ticket to such a medication. In the study, Ding’s team identified a previously unknown biochemical assembly line, in a network of nerve cells strongly tied to addiction, that produces a substance whose effect appears to prevent pleasurable activity from becoming addictive. The substance, known as GABA, acts as a brake on downstream nerve-cell transmission.

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Neuroscience, Pediatrics, Research

Tutoring changes the brain in kids with math learning disabilities

Tutoring changes the brain in kids with math learning disabilities

One-on-one tutoringA new Stanford study, publishing today in Nature Communications, sheds light on how to help children with math learning disabilities. One-on-one cognitive tutoring improves math performance and also normalizes problems in several parts of the brains of these children, the research found.

The findings are important because math learning disabilities often fall off educators’ and parents’ radar. (Everyone has heard of dyslexia, but its numerical equivalent, dyscalculia? Not so much.) Yet math learning disabilities can hamper a child’s ability to gain basic life skills such as managing time and money, and can prevent children from growing up to pursue math- and science-related careers.

The new study is similar to another recent experiment that demonstrated alleviation of math anxiety with tutoring. Both studies are the work of the Stanford MathBrain Project, led by Vinod Menon, PhD.

In the new research, 30 children in third grade received eight weeks of one-on-one tutoring in basic arithmetic skills; half of the kids had math learning disabilities and half did not. The instructors adjusted the sessions’ pace and emphasis individually for each child, helping students past bottlenecks in their learning without making them feel like they might be falling behind their peers. All of the children got MRI brain scans before and after tutoring.

Before tutoring began, the kids with math learning disabilities had abnormal function in a network of brain areas involved in solving numerical problems, including the parietal, prefrontal and ventral temporal-occipital areas. Kids without math learning disabilities did not show these problems. After tutoring, the differences between the two groups’ brain scans disappeared. The children’s math performance also improved, in sync with the brain changes.

These findings suggest that tutoring actually fixes the brain issues at the root of math learning disabilities, rather than providing children with a work-around that circumvents the real problem.

“We demonstrate that, in parallel with performance normalization, 1:1 tutoring elicits extensive functional brain changes in children with math learning disabilities, normalizing their brain activity to the level of neurotypical peers,” the researchers wrote in their paper.

The scientists want to conduct follow-up studies to find out how long the effects of tutoring last. Their new discoveries also lay a framework for studying how to intervene in other forms of learning disabilities.

Previously: Stanford team shows that one-on-one tutoring relieves math anxiety in children, Stanford team uses brain scans to forecast development of kids’ math skills and New research tracks “math anxiety” in the brain
Photo by U.S. Department of Education

Health and Fitness, Public Health, Research

Study shows taking short walks may offset negative health impact of prolonged sitting

Study shows taking short walks may offset negative health impact of prolonged sitting

3046594832_cc702e6266_zWhile most of us know that sitting for prolonged periods of time can be detrimental to our health, sometimes, despite our best intentions, we’re locked into our seats by other circumstances. Perhaps you’re on a long flight with lots of turbulence and, even though our activity tracker is buzzing us to stand up, the fasten seatbelt sign forces you to ignore the alerts. Or maybe you’re at a daylong workshop or training and the opportunities to stretch your legs are few and far between. But recent research suggests that you may be able to counteract such periods of prolonged sitting with a short walk.

In the small study published in Experimental Physiology, researchers at the University of Missouri and University of Texas at Arlington compared the vascular function of a group of healthy men at the beginning of the project, after sitting for six hours and again once they completed a short walk. Results confirmed that when you sit for the majority of an eight-hour work day, blood flow to your legs is significantly reduced. The findings also showed “that just 10 minutes of walking after sitting for an extended time reversed the detrimental consequences,” lead author Jaume Padilla, PhD, said in a release.

In addition to keeping your vascular system in good working order, walking can boost your creative inspiration. A past Stanford study showed a person’s creative output increased by an average of 60 percent when he or she was walking.

Previously: Does TV watching, or prolonged sitting, contribute to child obesity rates?, More evidence that prolonged inactivity may shorten life span, increase risk of chronic disease, Study shows frequent breaks from sitting may improve heart health, weight loss and How sedentary behavior affects your health
Photo by Laura Billings

Cardiovascular Medicine, Research, Stanford News, Stem Cells

Tension helps heart cells develop normally, Stanford study shows

Tension helps heart cells develop normally, Stanford study shows

heart_newsTension might not be fun for us, but it looks like it’s critical for our hearts. So much so that without a little tension heart cells in the lab fail to develop normally.

This is a finding that took a mechanical engineer looking at a biological problem to solve. For many years now scientists have been able to mature stem cells into beating clumps of cells in the lab. But although those cells could beat, they didn’t do it very well. They don’t produce much force, can’t maintain a steady rhythm and would be a failure at pumping actual blood.

Beth Pruitt, PhD, a Stanford mechanical engineer, realized that in our bodies heart cells are under considerable tension, and thought that might be critical to how the cells develop.

She and postdoctoral scholar Alexandre Ribeiro started investigating how heart cells matured in different shapes and under different amounts of tension. They found a combination that produces normal looking cells with strong contractions.
The work could be useful for scientists hoping to replace animal heart cells as the gold standard for identifying heart-related side effects of drugs. Those cells are quite different from our own and often fail to detect side effects that could damage hearts in people taking the drug.

In my story about the work, I quote Ribeiro saying, “We hope this can be a drop-in replacement for animal cells, and potentially instead of having to do individual recordings from each cell we could use video analysis.”

Previously: A new era for stem cells in cardiac medicine? A simple, effective way to generate patient-specific heart muscle cells and “Clinical trial in a dish” may make common medicines safer, say Stanford scientists
Photo by Alexandre Ribeiro

Research, Stanford News, Women's Health

Measuring how military service affects women’s longevity and overall health

Measuring how military service affects women's longevity and overall health

16044566446_77b89745de_zDespite the large numbers of women who serve in the military, there is a dearth of information about their postmenopausal health risks and how military service might impact their longevity. Now comes a study of more than 3,700 female veterans, led by a Stanford-affiliated psychologist, which is the first to examine the postmenopausal health of women veterans who participated in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and who, given their ages, likely served in World War II or the Korean War.

The study, which appears online in the journal Women’s Health Issues, shows these women have higher all-cause mortality rates than non-veterans, even though their risks for heart disease, cancer, diabetes and hip fractures were found to be the same.

“The findings underscore the salience of previous military service as a critical factor in understanding women’s postmenopausal health and mortality risk, and the value of comparing women veterans to appropriately selected groups of non-veteran women, rather than benchmarking their health against that of the general public. It also reminds us of the importance of including women veterans in research,” said Julie Weitlauf, PhD, the study’s lead author and a clinical associate professor (affiliated) of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the School of Medicine.

The Women’s Health Initiative is one of the most comprehensive research initiatives undertaken on the post-menopausal health of women, involving more than 160,000 women, including nearly 4,000 veterans.

Women can only serve in the military if they are deemed to be in good health, and military service stresses physical activity and many other elements of a healthy lifestyle, thus contributing to the concept of a “healthy soldier effect,” Weitlauf said. That explains why research typically shows that veterans, including women, have better health and lower mortality risk than non-veterans from the general public, she said. While the women in the study, most of whom who were likely military nurses, were probably very fit and healthy during their time of service, this effect may not be sustained throughout their lifetimes.

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Health Policy, NIH, Research, Science Policy, Stanford News

NIH tries to reduce the gray in the grant pool

NIH tries to reduce the gray in the grant pool

This 45-second animation vividly illustrates the funding crisis that young scientists face as they work to launch their research careers: For the last three decades, large NIH grants have increasingly been awarded to older investigators.

“The average age of first-time, R01-funded investigators who have PhDs remains 42, even after seven years of policies at NIH to increase the numbers of new and early-stage investigators,” said Robin Barr, director of the NIH’s Division of Extramural Activities, in a recent editorial on the NIH website.

But there is hope on the horizon, as the NIH rolls out a series of funding mechanisms that aim to give new investigators a leg up. I recently wrote about one such program, the KL2 mentored career development award, and an inspirational Stanford physician-researcher, Rita Hamad, MD, MPH, who is taking full advantage of it.

Hamad is interested in studying the cause-and-effect relationships between poverty and health. The KL2 program helps Hamad’s research through salary support, mentoring, pilot grants and tuition subsidies. In just two years, she has produced actionable data that can be used by policymakers and by health-care providers to improve the overall health of populations, including a study exploring the impact of the earned-income tax credit on child health in the United States. It will be published this fall in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Previously:NIH funding mechanism “totally broken,” says Stanford researcher, NIH director on scaring young scientists with budget cuts: “If they go away, they won’t come back” and Sequestration hits the NIH – fewer new grants, smaller budgets
Animation by the NIH

Infectious Disease, Microbiology, Research, Stanford News

Why C. difficile-defanging mouse cure may work in people, too

Why C. difficile-defanging mouse cure may work in people, too

CdiffI wrote a news release last week about a study just published in Science Translational Medicine. The study, despite it having been conducted in mice, not humans, received a fair amount of coverage – by The Washington Post, Yahoo!, Fox News, NBC, CBS and Reuters, among other places – and deserved the attention it got. It demonstrated the efficacy of a small-molecule drug that can disable the nasty intestinal pathogen C. difficile without killing it – and, importantly, without decimating the “good” bacteria that populate our gut by the trillions.

That’s a big deal. If you want to see a lot of ugly weeds pop up, there’s no better way to go about it than letting your lawn go to hell.

C. difficile – responsible for more than 250,000 hospitalizations and 15,000 deaths per year in the United States and a $4 billion annual health-care tab in the U.S. alone – is typically treated by antibiotics, which have the unfortunate side effect of wiping out much of our intestinal microbe population. That loss of carpeting, ironically, lays the groundwork for a dangerous and all-too-common comeback of C. difficile infection.

A question worth asking about this study, conducted by what-makes-pathogens-tick expert Matt Bogyo, PhD, and a team of Stanford associates: Why should we think that what works in mice is going to work in people?

The only sure answer isn’t a torrent of language but a clinical trial of the drug, ebselen, in real, live people with C. difficile infections or at risk for them. (Bogyo has already started accumulating funding to initiate a trial along those lines.)

But there’s also reassurance to be drawn from the fact that ebselen isn’t an entirely exotic newcomer to the world of medical research. As I noted in my release:

Bogyo and his associates focused on … ebselen because, in addition to having a strong inhibitory effect, ebselen also has been tested in clinical trials for chemotherapy-related hearing loss and for stroke. Preclinical testing provided evidence that ebselen is safe and tolerable, and it has shown no significant adverse effects in ensuing clinical trials.

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Research, Science, Stanford News

#NextGreatDiscovery: Exploring the important work of basic scientists

#NextGreatDiscovery: Exploring the important work of basic scientists

Today, Stanford is launching a digital series, called #NextGreatDiscovery, to share the stories of some of the scientists doing groundbreaking basic research here. Through photographs and short videos, followers will get a taste of the work of these grad students, postdocs and professors – in fields ranging from computational structural biology to genetics to immunology – and hear about how important it is that this work continues. After all, basic science not only advances knowledge but has the potential to lead to great biomedical innovations.

Our series comes at a time where national funding for research is critically low, and some investigators are opting to leave academia in favor of industry positions that may not support fundamental research. What would we lose if more of these great minds chose different paths? What would go undiscovered? It’s something to keep in mind as you read this feature story, view our photos on Instagram, and follow #NextGreatDiscovery on Twitter.

Previously: The value of exploring jellyfish eyes: Scientist-penned book supports “curiosity-driven” research, Basic research underlies effort to thwart “greatest threat to face humanity” and Funding basic science leads to clinical discoveries, eventually
Photo by Peter van Agtmael/Magnum Photos

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