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Big data, BigDataMed15, Events, Precision health, Research, Stanford News, Technology

At Big Data in Biomedicine, Stanford’s Lloyd Minor focuses on precision health

At Big Data in Biomedicine, Stanford's Lloyd Minor focuses on precision health

Minor talking - 560

In the next decade, Stanford Medicine will lead the biomedical revolution in precision health, Dean Lloyd Minor, MD, told attendees of the final day of the Big Data in Biomedicine conference.

Involving all aspects of Stanford Medicine — including research and patient care — the focus on precision health will draw on Stanford’s existing strengths while propelling the development of new discoveries and transforming health-care delivery, Minor explained.

The choice of “precision health” rather than “precision medicine” is deliberate and a distinction that is reflective of Stanford’s leadership role. While both precision health and precision medicine are targeted and personalized, precision health is proactive, with an emphasis on maintaining health. In contrast, precision medicine is reactive, with a focus on caring for the sick. Precision health includes prediction and prevention; precision medicine involves diagnosis and treatment.

Minor used the model of a tree to describe Stanford’s focus on precision health.

Basic research and biomedical data science form the trunk, the foundation that supports the entire endeavor. Nine “biomedical platforms” form the major branches; these platforms include immunology, cancer biology and the neurosciences, among others. The tree’s leaves are its clinical core, with treatment teams in cardiac care, cancer and maternal and newborn health, for example.

The growth of the tree, its tippy top, is fueled by predictive, preventative and longitudinal care — where innovations in knowledge and care drive further changes in the future of health-care.

Minor made two key points about the tree, and its implications for research and care at Stanford.

First, the tree is big and growing. “There is room for everyone on the tree,” he said. “That is one thing that will make this plan — this tree — so powerful.”

Secondly, the tree is ever-changing. “Care will be analyzed and fed back. That’s really the true heart and meaning of the learning health-care system,” Minor said. “Every encounter is part of a much bigger whole.”

The entire effort will be fueled by big data, Minor said. To recognize its importance, and help train future leaders, Stanford Medicine also plans to create a new biomedical data science Department.

“We’re poised to lead,” Minor said. “We build upon a history of innovation, an entrepreneurial mindset, visionary faculty and students and a culture of collaboration.”

Previously: Big Data in Biomedicine conference kicks off todayStanford Medicine’s Lloyd Minor on re-conceiving medical education and Meet the medical school’s new dean: Lloyd Minor
Photo by Saul Bromberger

Cardiovascular Medicine, Events, Patient Care, Stanford News

Honoring doctors, nurses of the early days of Stanford’s coronary care unit

Honoring doctors, nurses of the early days of Stanford’s coronary care unit

image.img.320.highWhen I was in the hospital recently to give birth to my daughter, I saw my doctors briefly during their rounds, but it was the nurses and nurse midwives who primarily cared for me. So when I read in a recent Inside Stanford Medicine feature story that 50 years ago, nurses weren’t even allowed to perform tasks like start IVs, I was shocked.

In the 1960s, Stanford was home to one of the earliest coronary care units, led by Alfred Spivack, MD. Spivack taught the nurses working on the unit to take on tasks that were, at the time, mainly done by physicians. Joan Fair, PhD, RN, who was one of the unit’s original nurses and is now a cardiovascular researcher, recalls:

“Some doctors were totally against nurses doing these kinds of things… It also took time for some doctors to accept our opinions about how their patients were doing, or if we saw a problem and called them and asked them to take a different line of treatment.”

Joan Mersch, MSN, the unit’s former nurse coordinator, described in the piece how beneficial this extra training was to patients. “When you know how to read electrocardiograms, recognize lethal cardiac rhythms, perform resuscitation and defibrillation — it saves patient lives,” she said. “You understand what needs to be done, and you can take action.”

A big proponent of using technology to improve care, Spivack depended on the nurses to learn how to use the devices and incorporate them in the daily care of patients. And he also encouraged the nurses to pursue their research interests; many, like Fair, went on to obtain graduate degrees.

Last month, almost two dozen former nurses from the unit came together for a dinner celebrating a major gift from Spivack, which will pay for the nurses’ station in the new heart acute care unit when the new adult hospital opens in 2018.

Photo by Steve Fisch

Events, Mental Health, Sexual Health, Stanford News, Women's Health

Women’s health experts tackle mood disorders and sexual assault

Women's health experts tackle mood disorders and sexual assault

3131235412_fa7f528735_zEarlier this week I reported from the Women’s Health Forum, held on Monday for the sixth year running. The hardest part about attending the event was deciding which among all the interesting talks to attend.

Among the many sessions, the two that most piqued my interest focused on women’s mental health. Katherine (Ellie) Williams, MD, spoke about mood disorders related to the menstrual cycle, and Laraine Zappert, PhD, discussed the psychological impact of sexual assault. Both are from the school’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

Williams’ talk began with a cartoon of a dishwasher bursting with dishes, clothes, a phone, a vacuum – above a caption quip about PMS. The out-of-control energy of the sketch conveys the affective thundercloud often associated with women and their “hormones.” Williams identified three periods when this thundercloud may be an actual mood disorder, as opposed to “normal” fluctuations: pre-menstrual, perinatal, and perimenopausal.

Technically speaking, “PMS” is about physical symptoms and is fairly common, whereas pre-menstrual dysphoric disorders (PMDDs) is all about mood and affects less than 5 percent of women. The disruption happens in the luteal phase of a woman’s cycle, usually the two weeks after ovulation – this is a big chunk of time we’re talking about, nearly 50 percent! Treatments for disorders in all periods include exercise, acupuncture, and diet supplements, and pharmaceuticals like certain birth control pills and antidepressants (which interestingly work differently for women with PMDD than for people in general – when taken only during that luteal phase, they have fast onset time and cause no withdrawal symptoms).

Researchers are learning more about how to predict and prevent cycle-related mood disorders, and increasingly it is clear that life context plays a major role. Stressful life events, interpersonal conflicts, marital tension, and previous mental-health instabilities (from being a perfectionist to having suffered childhood abuse or major depressive breakdowns) are the primary risk factors. This knowledge means clinical practitioners have to think much more broadly about how to help women, particularly in terms of prevention, Williams said.

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Big data, BigDataMed15, Events, Patient Care, Research, Stanford News, Technology

Experts at Big Data in Biomedicine: Bigger, better datasets and technology will benefit patients

Experts at Big Data in Biomedicine: Bigger, better datasets and technology will benefit patients

population health panelThe explosion of big data is transforming the way those in health care are diagnosing, treating and preventing disease, panelists at the Big Data in Biomedicine said on its opening day.

During a five-member panel on population health, experts outlined work that is currently being done but said even bigger datasets and better technology are needed to ramp up the benefits from digital data and to save lives.

“Using the end-of-millions to inform care for the end-of-one – that is exactly where we’re going,” said Tracy Lieu, MD, MPH, director of research at Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a health-care network that includes 21 hospitals, 8,000 physicians and 3.6 million patients. “And we think that in a population like ours, in an integrated system like ours, we are in an ideal setting to do personalized medicine.”

Stanford Medicine professor Douglas Owens, MD, director of the Center for Health Policy and Center for Primary and Outcomes Research, led the panel on Wednesday. He said that big data is also changing how research is being conducted.

“There’s been an explosion of data of all kinds: clinical data, genomics data, data about what we do and how we live,” said Owens. “And the question is how can we best use that data to improve the health of the individual and to improve the health of populations.”

Lieu said two key trends are central to medical researchers: informatics and genomics. She told attendees that Kaiser utilizes a “virtual data warehouse” with the digital data of 14 million patients dating back to 1960. But Lieu cautioned that the data are not always the means to an end, particularly if the findings are not tested and implemented.

“Sometimes we fail. And we fail when we identify a problem of interest, we make a decision to study it, we assemble the data, we analyze and interpret the results – and then we send them off to journals. So we fail to close the loop,” she said, because researchers typically don’t go beyond the publication of data.

Lieu said Kaiser is now focused on trying to close that loop. “To do that, we need the kinds of tools that you in this group and the speakers at this conference are developing,” she explained. “We need better and better technology for rapidly analyzing and aggregating data.”

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Events, Stanford News

Stanford Medicine’s Health Matters event, in pictures

Stanford Medicine's Health Matters event, in pictures

Last weekend’s Health Matters, an annual event, drew more than 750 people to the Stanford Medicine campus. Along with hearing about the latest medical and health advances, participants were offered the chance to talk one-on-one with some of our experts and to participate in a dizzying array of hands-on activities.

For those of you who missed out (and even those who didn’t), save the date for next year’s event: May 14, 2016.

Previously: Stanford’s Health Matters happening on Saturday
Photos by CM Howard Photography

Behavioral Science, Complementary Medicine, Events, Medical Education, Stanford News

Advice for young docs from psychiatrist David Spiegel: Find a mentor and pursue your passion

Spiegel in office - smallThe takeaway from Stanford David Spiegel‘s recent lunchtime discussion, part of the Psychiatry and Behavioral Science Grand Rounds, was simple: You can’t make it on your own; accept, welcome and offer assistance. To succeed as an academic psychiatrist, it isn’t necessary to come from a line of psychiatrists, as Spiegel, MD, does, he said.

But junior physicians do need mentors, those who know the formal and informal rules of the system and who are willing to make time and lend a hand, a practice Spiegel attributed to his mentor, Irvin Yalom, emeritus professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

Spiegel said that early in his career, he would initially get discouraged when papers or grants would be rejected. Then, he came across a statistic that few hockey players make it out of their first year in the National Hockey League with all of their teeth. It was an “a-ha” moment for the second-generation psychiatrist (Spiegel’s parents were both psychiatrists). Despite hard work, even the best scientists encounter challenges and adversity.

Now, Spiegel is the Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. He directs the Stanford Center on Stress and Health and is also medical director for the Stanford Center for Integrative Medicine.

Spiegel offered additional advice to the 80-or-so people who gathered to hear him: Disregard convention and explore your interests. “You will do your best work if you’re doing something you’re passionate about,” he said.

Despite the prevalence of psychotherapy, and then of community psychiatry, Spiegel said he stuck by his interest in hypnosis, despite its poor reputation. By conducting statistically sound studies, he developed a body of work demonstrating that hypnosis has real, replicable benefits. This work stood up to critical skeptics and helped secure his tenured position at Stanford, Spiegel said.

Stanford then, and now, has accepted work that expands the bounds of disciplines, as long as it stands up to scientific scrutiny, Spiegel said. “Do whatever the hell you want to do, but be scientific and empirical about it. If you can demonstrate it works, fine,” Spiegel said. He concluded with this parting phrase: “Data rocks!”

Previously: “Tranceformation:” David Spiegel on how hypnosis can change your brain’s perception of your body, Starting a new career in academic medicine? Here’s a bible for the bedside: The Academic Medicine Handbook, Exploring the science of hypnosis with Stanford’s David Spiegel and Stanford psychiatrist David Spiegel’s path west
Photo by L.A. Cicero

Events, Health and Fitness, Nutrition, Obesity, Stanford News, Women's Health

Women’s health expert: When it comes to prevention, diet and exercise are key

Women's health expert: When it comes to prevention, diet and exercise are key

16262076932_96f8309b43_zThis Monday was the sixth annual Stanford Women’s Health Forum, hosted by Stanford’s Women and Sex Differences in Medicine center (WSDM), and I was happy to have been present for the lively talks. The forum focused on prevention, and the keynote, delivered by Marcia Stefanick, PhD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology and WSDM director, highlighted physical activity and weight management as the key preventative actions for women to take.

High blood pressure remains the number one preventable cause of death in women, with physical inactivity and high BMI, both of which contribute to high blood pressure, in third and fourth place. (For the curious readers, smoking comes in second.) Because prevention requires changes in behavior, behavior was what Stefanick focused on. Rather than reinforcing many women’s feelings of embarrassment about their weight, she said, providers should help women feel that they can do something about it.

Healthier behaviors must include diet and exercise. Both fatness and low fitness cause higher mortality; realistic expectations about how to change both should factor into care. Stefanick emphasized that weight loss should be slow: 10 percent of one’s body weight baseline over six months, or one pound per week for moderately overweight people, and no more than two pounds per week. And we need to stop being so sedentary, Stefanick exclaimed. The classic principles of exercise apply – gradually increase the frequency, intensity, and/or duration of exertion. Adults should be getting at least two and a half hours of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity per week, in addition to doing muscle-strengthening activities at least twice a week, the conference flyer read.

However, citing the problems of eating disorders and older women losing weight without trying, Stefanick stressed that “weight management is a spectrum; there are extremes at both ends.” In describing variations on mesomorphic, endomorphic, and ectomorphic body types, she stated that “we don’t know what the optimal body type is.” It probably varies for each person.

Something I found particularly interesting was Stefanick’s description of gynoid vs android fat distribution patterns (which I learned as “pear” and “apple” body shapes, respectively). Gynoid distribution around the hips, thighs, and butt is more common in women, and includes more subcutaneous fat, while in android distribution, which is more common in men, fat collects around the belly and chest and is actually dispersed among the organs. Such intra-abdominal fat is more damaging to health, as it affects the liver and lipid profile and can cause heart disease, but it’s also much easier to get rid of through exercise (which is one reason men overall have less trouble losing weight than women).

In the spirit of more personalized care, Stefanick also discussed how recommended weight changes during pregnancy should vary according to the person’s prenatal BMI. Someone underweight could gain up to 40 pounds and be healthy, she pointed out, while obese people might actually lose weight during pregnancy for optimal mother-baby health.

Previously: Why it’s critical to study the impact of gender differences on diseases and treatmentsWhen it comes to weight loss, maintaining a diet is more important than diet typeApple- or pear-shaped: Which is better for cancer prevention?A call to advance research on women’s health issues and To meet weight loss goals, start exercise and healthy eating programs at the same time
Photo by Mikaku

Bioengineering, Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford News

From popsicle sticks to improved medical care

This post is part of the Biodesign’s Jugaad series following a group of Stanford Biodesign fellows from India. (Jugaad is a Hindi word that means an inexpensive, innovative solution.) The fellows will spend months immersed in the interdisciplinary environment of Stanford Bio-X, learning the Biodesign process of researching clinical needs and prototyping a medical device. The Biodesign program is now in its 14th year, and past fellows have successfully launched 36 companies focused on developing devices for unmet medical needs

IMG_6141 300Shashi Ranjan, PhD, and Harsh Sheth, MD, fiddled with popsicle sticks and tiny wires in the final throes of prototyping possible biodesign solutions for two medical needs: fixing pacemaker leads or improving catheter urine drainage.

The popsicle stick device hardly looked like something that would inspire confidence in a person undergoing surgery, but if it worked and could be miniaturized and made out of more durable materials it could provide a solution for the pacemaker leads that are prone to coming unfixed after they are inserted.

The team had narrowed their search down from the 315 medical needs they had originally identified using a weighted matrix of requirements. Sheth told me that what stood out about addressing the final two needs was the large number of people who could benefit, lack of other solutions and lack of competing products.

All of those add up to a product that could inspire venture funding and eventual development, which is the goal of the biodesign process.

Sheth said the prototypes they were building now would help determine which of the two needs the group eventually chose to address, and how. They had four ideas to try out for the pacemaker leads and five ideas for improving urine drainage. “We’ll know which of these ideas have value after this step,” Sheth told me.

The group (which includes Debayan Saha, who was elsewhere during this prototyping session) returns to India after the Stanford phase of the fellowship ends in June. At that point they’ll repeat the process of identifying medical needs and prototyping solutions in India. Sheth and Ranjan said they hope to have patents in place for their Stanford prototype, with the idea of potentially returning to it after the fellowship.

Previously: The next challenge for biodesign: constraining health-care costsFollowing the heart and the mind in biodesign and Stanford-India Biodesign co-founder: Our hope is to “inspire others and create a ripple effect” in India

Neuroscience, Sleep, Stanford News, Videos

Exploring the history and study of sleep with Stanford’s William Dement

Exploring the history and study of sleep with Stanford's William Dement

The Good Stuff, a playlist-based online show, kicked off a week-long series about sleep with an interview with well-known sleep researcher William Dement, MD, PhD, who many refer to as the “father of sleep medicine.”

It’s surprising how new the field of sleep research is. As host Matt says about the discovery of rapid eye movement during sleep in the 1950s, “We developed the atom bomb before we noticed people’s eyes were moving while they slept?” Dement was the first to find that we sleep during REM sleep as a medical student at the University of Chicago. He later went on to describe the five stages of sleep as well as to study sleep disorders and the effects of sleep deprivation.

Dement is amusing and charming in the interview, and I feel like I got a glimpse into why Dement’s Sleep and Dreams class at Stanford is so popular.

Part two of the series – which addresses the question “Why do we sleep?” and features Dement and Clete Kushida, MD, PhD, medical director of the Stanford Sleep Medicine Center – was posted today, and parts three and four will be posted later this week.

Previously: “Father of Sleep Medicine” talks with CNN about what happens when we don’t sleep well, Stanford doc gives teens a crash course on the dangers of sleep deprivation, William Dement: Stanford Medicine’s “Sandman”, Stanford docs discuss all things sleepThanks, Jerry: Honoring pioneering Stanford sleep research and An afternoon with bedheads and Deadheads

Autoimmune Disease, Bioengineering, Immunology, Research, Stanford News

Adult humans harbor lots of risky autoreactive immune cells, study finds

Adult humans harbor lots of risky autoreactive immune cells, study finds

dangerIf a new study published in Immunity is on the mark, the question immunologists may start asking themselves will be not “Why do some people get autoimmune disease?” but “Why doesn’t everybody get it?”

The study, by pioneering Stanford immunologist Mark Davis, PhD, and colleagues, found that vast numbers of self-reactive immune cells remain in circulation well into adulthood, upending a long-established consensus among immunologist that these self-reactive immune cells are weeded out early in life in an organ called the thymus.

A particular type of immune cell, called “killer T cells,” is particularly adept at attacking cells showing signs of harboring viruses or of becoming cancerous. As I wrote in my news release about Davis’s study:

[The human immune system generates] a formidable repertoire of such cells, collectively capable of recognizing and distinguishing between a vast array of different antigens – the biochemical bits that mark pathogens or cancerous cells (as well as healthy cells) for immune detection. For this reason, pathogenic invaders and cancerous cells seldom get away with their nefarious plans.

Trouble is, I wrote:

[This repertoire includes] not only immune cells that can become appropriately aroused by any of the billions of different antigens characteristic of pathogens or tumors, but also immune cells whose activation could be triggered by myriad antigens in the body’s healthy tissues. This does happen on occasion, giving rise to autoimmune disease. But it happens among few enough people and, mostly, late enough in life that it seems obvious that something is keeping it from happening to the rest of us from day one.

It’s been previously thought that the human body solves this problem by eliminating all the self-reactive T cells during our early years via a mysterious select-and-delete operation performed in a mysterious gland called the thymus that’s nestled between your heart and your breastbone. Sometime in or near your early teens, the thymus mysteriously begins to shrink, eventually withering and largely turning to useless fat. (Is that mysterious enough for you? It sure creeps me out.)

But Davis and his team used some sophisticated technology – some of it originally invented by Davis, some of it by Stanford bioengineering professor and fellow study co-author Stephen Quake, PhD – to show that, contrary to prevailing dogma, tons of self-reactive killer T-cells remain in circulation well into adulthood. Then the scientists proceeded to explore possible reasons why the immune system keeps these risky cells around (it boils down to: just in case a pathogen from Mars comes along and we need to throw the kitchen sink at it) and why (at least most of the time) they leave our healthy tissues alone: A still-to-be-fully-elucidated set of molecular mechanisms keeps these self-reactive cells locked in the biochemical equivalent of parking gear, shifting out of which requires unambiguous signs of an actual pathogen’s presence: bits of debris from a bacterial cell wall, or stretches of characteristically viral DNA.

That’s our immune system, folks. Complicated, mysterious, and yet somehow incredibly efficient. You really don’t want to leave home – or even the womb – without it.

Previously: In human defenses against disease, environment beats heredity, study of twins shows, Knight in lab: In days of yore, postdoc armed with quaint research tools found immunology’s Holy Grail, In men, a high testosterone count can mean a low immune response and Deja vu: Adults’ immune systems “remember” microscopic monsters they’ve never seen before
Photo by Frederic Bisson

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