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Nutrition, Stanford News, Videos

Stanford dietitian explains how – not just what – you eat matters

Stanford dietitian explains how - not just what - you eat matters

Recent posts, including this one from last week and this one from earlier today, offered sound advice to help avoid overeating around the holidays. Of course, we all know that at times we overindulge. But Stanford’s Neha Shah, a registered dietitian with expertise in digestive issues that affect nutritional intake, knows that how we eat is important, too; it’s not just about what we put in our stomachs, but how we do that. In this Stanford Health Care video, titled “How You Eat Matters,” sit back and learn some techniques that might just make your digestive system much happier. And you, too, of course.

Previously: Easy-to-follow tips to avoid overeating this holiday

Infectious Disease, Research, Science, Stanford News

Science Friday-style podcast explains work toward a universal flu vaccine

Science Friday-style podcast explains work toward a universal flu vaccine

I had the pleasure of teaching a class this fall to a group of mostly chemistry and chemical engineering graduate students, helping them improve their skills communicating about their science with the public. For her assignment, graduate student Julie Fogarty recorded this Science Friday-style segment on work taking place in the lab of chemical biologist and bioengineer James Swartz, PhD. Swartz and colleagues are trying to develop a universal flu vaccine that would eliminate the need to get a new vaccine each year – something all of us would probably appreciate. (Here I’m thinking about my colleague Michelle Brandt, who recently suffered the woes of not finding time to get her kids vaccinated.)

Julie’s brother Skyped in for his role as Science Friday host extraordinaire Ira Flatow in this segment, while Julie played the enthusiastic and articulate guest. It’s often difficult to explain complex science in audio format, but Julie does a fantastic job explaining the work in way that is very visual. I love her description of the flu virus as a little mushroom.

(A previous blog entry featured another student, Rhiannon Thomas-Tran, who produced a great video about her work.)

Previously: Working to create a universal flu vaccine, Graduate student explains pain research in two-minute video and How one mom learned the importance of the flu shot – the hard way

Global Health, Pediatrics, Public Safety, Research, Stanford News, Women's Health

Working to prevent sexual assaults in Kenya

Working to prevent sexual assaults in Kenya

Kenyan slumsThe little girl bounded up to us, wearing a filthy pink sweater, with a beaming smile on her face, and gave me a huge hug. Surprised at the reception, I hugged her back and swung her gently back and forth. She giggled and ran to hug my colleagues, then, hopping over an open sewer, darted into an alley that lead to her home. We followed as quickly as we could over the slippery mud, down one alleyway than another. Within a few minutes we reached her house, a 5’ by 10’ structure made of mud and wood, without windows, electricity, or locks. The girl, named Lianna*, lives here with her two year-old brother, who calls her “Mama”, as she is his primary caretaker. Their mother is a bartender and likely also a sex worker, and returns home only occasionally. The home is filthy, smells bad, and is without food or water. Yet this beautiful child, brimming with energy and intelligence, is proud to show it to us and to introduce us to her sibling.

Lianna is a resident of Korogocho, one of the poorest informal settlements (known to many as slums) in the Nairobi region of Kenya. Korogocho itself has about 52,000 residents, and it borders on other, larger informal settlements such as Dandora. Poverty and lack of sanitation are the norm in these communities, and crime is extremely high. Girls in these settlements may be especially vulnerable, with 18-25 percent of adolescent girls reporting being sexually assaulted each year, often by friends and relatives.

A multidisciplinary team at Stanford has been working in these communities on a sexual assault prevention project with two Kenyan non-governmental organizations (NGOs), Ujamaa and No Means No Worldwide (NMNW), for about two years. This past July, my colleague Mike Baiocchi, PhD, and I traveled to Kenya to meet the local NGO staff, become familiar with the communities they work in, and advance their research capacity.

Ujamaa, led by Jake Sinclair, MD, a pediatrician from John Muir Hospital, has been working in these and other settlements, including Kibera, Mathare, Huruma, Kariobangi, for more than 14 years, and has partnered with NMNW for several years. NMNW, led by Lee Paiva Sinclair, developed a curriculum to reduce sexual assault by teaching empowerment and self-defense, and works with Ujamaa to implement this curriculum in the slums. The Stanford team became involved in order to research the effectiveness of this intervention.

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Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford News, Videos

Stanford patient benefits from total artificial heart

Stanford patient benefits from total artificial heart

Mechanical support for failing hearts is not a new idea. Size, however, matters. In 1966, Michael DeBakey, MD, successfully implanted the first device to replace the pumping action on the left side of the heart. Now, at medical centers like Stanford, the LVAD, or left ventricular assist device, about 3 inches long, is a workhorse that enables many people with heart disease to live a normal life. Sure, if you have an LVAD implanted in your chest, you have to wear a power pack and a reserve power pack outside your body, but most find that burden acceptable. Your heart also remains in your body. If the whole heart is failing, that’s another matter.

In 1969, Denton Cooley, MD, removed Haskell Karp’s diseased heart and replaced it with an artificial one intended only to keep the 47-year-old alive for the three days it took to find an appropriate human heart for transplant. He died two days after that transplant. The heart was driven by an air pump the size of a washing machine. By 1983, when William DeVries, MD, put an artificial heart in Barney Clark’s chest, it was because Clark was too sick for a transplant. The pump supporting the artificial heart was still the size of a washing machine. Clark would never be able to leave his hospital room even to walk down a hospital hallway. He died 112 days later.

A little over a year ago, Stanford cardiovascular surgeons removed the heart of chess teacher Vaness French. French had lived with heart disease for decades, altering his diet, upping his exercise, doing everything he could until one summer day in 2013, when he went into cardiac arrest at a baseball game. Luckily, he was with a friend who knew CPR and kept French alive. In the months before, his Stanford cardiologist, Dipanjee Banerjee, MD, had fine-tuned French’s medications and ablation had been tried to stabilize the atrial fibrillation French experienced frequently. Now, the only option to keep him alive was a human heart transplant or an artificial heart.

French’s survival until a transplant was available was seriously in doubt. French agreed to let a team of Stanford surgeons, led by Richard Ha, MD, implant an artificial one. Remarkably, in footage shot just two weeks after that implantation of the total artificial heart, French is up and around, albeit a bit slowly. The support machine for the artificial heart is now small and lightweight enough so he could leave his room, with a bit of help, of course. Two weeks later, even before he received a support machine so small and portable he would have been allowed to return home, the right human heart came French’s way. In the recently-released video above you can see an artificial heart implantation procedure – and hear how it changed French’s life.

Previously: “Liberated from LVAD support”: One patient’s story and Dick Cheney on his heart transplant: “It’s the gift of life itself”

Genetics, Neuroscience, Research, Science, Stanford News

Yeast advance understanding of Parkinson’s disease, says Stanford study

Yeast advance understanding of Parkinson's disease, says Stanford study

It’s amazing to me that the tiny, one-celled yeast can be such a powerful research tool. Now geneticist Aaron Gitler, PhD, has shown that the diminutive organism can even help advance the understanding of Parkinson’s disease and aid in identifying new genes involved in the disorder and new pathways and potential drug targets. He published his findings today in Neuron and told me in an email:

Parkinson’s disease is associated with many genetic and environmental susceptibility factors. Two of the newest Parkinson’s disease genes, EIF4G1 and VPS35, encode proteins involved in protein translation (the act of making protein from RNA messages) and protein sorting (shuttling proteins to the correct locations inside the cell), respectively. We used unbiased yeast genetic screens to unexpectedly discover a strong genetic interaction between these two genes, suggesting that the proteins they encode work together.

The proteins, EIF4G1 and VPS35, have changed very little from yeast to humans. Gitler and his colleagues showed that VPS35 interacts functionally with another protein implicated in Parkinson’s disease, alpha-synuclein, in yeast, round worms and even laboratory mice. As Gitler described:

Together, our findings connect three seemingly distinct Parkinson’s disease genes and provide a path forward for understanding how these genes might contribute to the disease and for identifying therapeutic interventions. More generally, our approach underscores the power of simple model systems for interrogating even complex human diseases.

Previously: Researchers pinpoint genetic suspects in ALS and In Stanford/Gladstone study, yeast genetics further ALS research

Chronic Disease, Genetics, Pediatrics, Stanford News

Stem cells implicated in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Stem cells implicated in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

640px-Duchenne-muscular-dystrophyStanford researchers published a paper today in Science Translational Medicine describing how stem cells are involved in the development of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a disease that results in progressive, often severe muscle weakness. It affects about one in every 3,600 boys born in the U.S.

The research team determined that the stem cells surrounding muscle tissue gradually became less able to create new muscle cells and instead begin to express genes that lead to connective tissue formation. Excess connective tissue accumulation, which is called fibrosis, occurs in many diseases. Thomas Rando, MD, PhD, a Stanford neurologist and one of the authors of the paper said in a release about the new study:

These cells are losing their ability to produce muscle, and are beginning to look more like fibroblasts, which secrete connective tissue. It’s possible that if we could prevent this transition in the muscle stem cells, we could slow or ameliorate the fibrosis seen in muscular dystrophy in humans.

The researchers also found that a drug already approved to treat high blood pressure in humans called losartin can slow these changes in stem cells in laboratory mice, although much more work is needed to find out if it could be helpful in children with Duchenne.

The researchers are focusing on how to get the drug to target only muscle cells, but they’re also interested in how they can apply their findings to other diseases. Rando, who directs the Glenn Center for the Biology of Aging at Stanford, also commented:

Fibrosis seems to occur in a vicious cycle. As the muscle stem cells become less able to regenerate new muscle, the tissue is less able to repair itself after damage. This leads to fibrosis, which then further impairs muscle formation. Understanding the biological basis of fibrosis could have a profound effect on many other diseases.

Previously: Working on a gene therapy for muscular dystrophy, New mouse model of muscular dystrophy provides clues to cardiac  failure, and Mouse model of muscular dystrophy points finger at stem cells
Photo of muscle cells affected by Duchenne disease by Edwin P. Ewing

Pediatrics, Research, Stanford News

Silicon Valley entrepreneur Sean Parker establishes allergy center at Stanford

Silicon Valley entrepreneur Sean Parker establishes allergy center at Stanford

DrKariNadeau-Dec2014Here at Scope, we’ve often written about the life-threatening nature of allergic reactions and the work that Stanford scientists are doing to understand dangerous allergies. For instance, Stanford immunologist Kari Nadeau, MD, PhD, (pictured at right) leads research to combat children’s food allergies with oral immunotherapy, a treatment in which patients consume tiny but gradually increasing doses of their allergy triggers under a doctor’s supervision.

Today, the efforts of Nadeau and other Stanford allergy researchers are receiving a big boost. Silicon Valley entrepreneur and philanthropist Sean Parker has announced that he’s donating $24 million to establish an allergy research center at Stanford, which Nadeau will lead. Parker has a personal interest in the topic because of his own experience with severe food allergies. Scientists at the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy Research at Stanford University will study the underlying mechanisms of all types of allergies in children and adults and will aim to develop lasting allergy cures.

From the press release about the center’s launch:

“We are excited about the center because there is enormous clinical need for better understanding of and treatment for allergies,” said Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of Stanford University School of Medicine. “For instance, the recent profound increase in the incidence of serious food allergy is fascinating and deeply concerning at the same time. Sean Parker’s generous gift will enable Stanford Medicine experts, under Dr. Nadeau’s leadership, to collaborate and innovate across academic disciplines for the benefit of millions of people with allergies.”

“I am thrilled and honored to direct the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy Research at Stanford University,” said Dr. Nadeau, associate professor of pediatrics at the medical school and an immunologist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford and Stanford Health Care. “Sean is well-versed in immunology, and has been a fantastic partner to work with. He’s an entrepreneur and visionary, and we look forward to using this gift and center as the springboard to improve the lives of those adults with allergies through immunotherapy that goes beyond oral therapy.”

Previously: Taking a bite out of food allergies: Stanford doctors exploring new ways to help sufferers, Ask Stanford Med: Pediatric immunologist answers your questions about food allergy research and Researchers show how DNA-based test could keep peanut allergy at bay

Cardiovascular Medicine, Events, Research, Stanford News

At Stanford Cardiovascular Institute’s annual retreat, a glimpse into the future of cardiovascular medicine

At Stanford Cardiovascular Institute’s annual retreat, a glimpse into the future of cardiovascular medicine

doctor listening to heartWhat will the future of cardiovascular medicine look like?

A group of scientists, engineers, educators, surgeons, physicians and students explored this question at the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute’s annual retreat earlier this month. More than 100 attendees crowded into Stanford’s Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge to learn about the research and advances that will transform cardiovascular care.

“For this year’s retreat we’ve  asked selected members to dig deep into the past and project the future of their specialties,” institute director Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, told the audience.

Talks presented during the day – on topics including sports medicine, stem cells, women’s health and biodesign – reflected the breadth of the institute’s scholarship and the diversity of its members.

Stem cell scientist Hiromitsu Nakuchi, MD, PhD, spoke about recent advances in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Only a few years ago, stem cell-based regenerative medicine was widely perceived as the province of science fiction. No more, Nakuchi said. His lab has been working on a new technique to transform human skin cells into induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells, which can then be used to develop organs. The ultimate goal of this research: To create genetically matched human organs in large animals.

Researchers like geneticist Michael Snyder, PhD, envision a day when an “omics” profile will be sequenced before birth, and Snyder took to the stage to discuss the potential of personalized medicine. “I’m a believer in the future,” he said. “Genomics will move medicine from diagnose-and-treat to predict-and-prevent.” After sequencing his own genome and thousands of other biomarkers to create an integrated personal omics profile, Snyder learned that he was at risk for Type 2 diabetes. This knowledge allowed him to transform his diet and ramp up his physical activity, and it provided him a first hand glimpse of the diagnostic power of genomics. Genomic sequencing has the potential to change the way physicians care for patients, Snyder told the audience, resulting in more effective, patient-tailored therapies and a greater focus on disease prevention.

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Chronic Disease, Stanford News, Videos

A primer on preventing or delaying type 2 diabetes

A primer on preventing or delaying type 2 diabetes

Diabetes affects an estimated 29 million Americans, and one in four people don’t know they have the disease, according to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Stanford Health Library recently held a three-part lecture series about preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes. A the first event, Stanford primary care doctor Bryant Lin, MD, shared with the audience that diabetes is “a topic near and dear to his heart” and that he deals with the disease “in both his personal life and clinical life.” Lin’s family medical history puts him at high risk for the disease: His mother, her six siblings and his maternal grandparents were all diagnosed with diabetes. On the clinical side, he treats diabetic patients at Stanford Health Care.

In the above video, Lin provides an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk-assessment and diagnosis of diabetes.

This video is the first lecture in a three-part series addressing important questions related to diabetes and lifestyle choices.

Previously: Diabetes and nutrition: Healthy holiday eating tips, red meat and disease risk, and going vegetarian, Diabetes and nutrition: Why healthy eating is a key component of prevention and management and Examining the role of exercise in managing and preventing diabetes

In the News, Patient Care, Pediatrics, Stanford News

Fifty-plus years of Sunshine: Long-time Stanford neonatologist discusses his career

Fifty-plus years of Sunshine: Long-time Stanford neonatologist discusses his career

sunshineWith a name like Dr. Sunshine, parents should know their premature babies are in good hands. On yesterday’s Forum, neonatologist Philip Sunshine, MD, discussed the fifty-plus years he’s been caring for preemies. At 84, he’s still at it, working 30 hours in a step-down nursery at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. (He jokingly told host Michael Krasny, “I do all the stuff the young people don’t want to do.”)

During the hour, Sunshine, a 2015 “Legends of Neonatology” honoree, talked about the changing field of neonatology, including his views on the ever-growing popularity of home births (“Home deliveries are for pizzas only,” he quipped, referencing a pin his former classmate always wore). He also read e-mails and took calls from listeners – many of whom thanked him for saving their children’s lives (30,000 and counting).

Previously: Eightysomething “neonatology superhero” still at itA pioneer of modern-day neonatology and Neonatologist celebrates 50 years of preemie care
Photo courtesy of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford

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