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Big data, Evolution, Genetics, In the News, Research, Science, Stanford News

Flies, worms and humans – and the modENCODE Project

Flies, worms and humans - and the modENCODE Project

It’s a big day in comparative biology. Researchers around the country, including Stanford geneticist Michael Snyder, PhD, are publishing the results of a massive collaboration meant to suss out the genomic similarities (and differences) among model organisms like the fruit fly and the laboratory roundworm. A package of four papers, which describe how these organisms control how, when and where they express certain genes to generate the cell types necessary for complex life, appears today in Nature.

From our release:

The research is an extension of the ENCODE, or Encyclopedia of DNA Elements, project that was initiated in 2003. As part of the large collaborative project, which was sponsored by the National Human Genome Research Institute, researchers published more than 4 million regulatory elements found within the human genome in 2012. Known as binding sites, these regions of DNA serve as landing pads for proteins and other molecules known as regulatory factors that control when and how genes are used to make proteins.

The new effort, known as modENCODE, brings a similar analysis to key model organisms like the fly and the worm. Snyder is the senior author of two of the papers published today describing some aspects of the modENCODE project, which has led to the publication, or upcoming publication, of more than 20 papers in a variety of journals. The Nature papers, and the modENCODE project, are summarized in a News and Views article in the journal (subscription required to access all papers).

As Snyder said in our release, “We’re trying to understand the basic principles that govern how genes are turned on and off. The worm and the fly have been the premier model organisms in biology for decades, and have provided the foundation for much of what we’ve learned about human biology. If we can learn how the rules of gene expression evolved over time, we can apply that knowledge to better understand human biology and disease.”

The researchers found that, although the broad strokes of gene regulation are shared among species, there are also significant differences. These differences may help explain why humans walk, flies fly and worms slither, for example:

The wealth of data from the modENCODE project will fuel research projects for decades to come, according to Snyder.

“We now have one of the most complete pictures ever generated of the regulatory regions and factors in several genomes,” said Snyder. “This knowledge will be invaluable to researchers in the field.”

Previously: Scientists announce the completion of the ENCODE project, a massive genome encyclopedia

Pain, Research, Stanford News

New painkiller could tackle pain, without risk of addiction

New painkiller could tackle pain, without risk of addiction

painkillersThose suffering from chronic pain, take note: A new pain-reliever may soon be on the scene that lacks the “high” of opioids and the cardiac-risk of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs) drugs such as aspirin. The compound reduced inflammatory pain in mice, according to research by a team of Stanford scientists led by Daria Mochly-Rosen, PhD, a professor of chemical and systems biology.

Mochly-Rosen discovered the compound, called Alda-1, more than five years ago while searching for the reason moderate alcohol use can decrease the severity of heart attacks. She found an enzyme, called aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, that breaks down a family of alcohol byproducts, called aldehydes. Aldehydes also cause pain in mice and Alda-1 relieves the pain, Mochly-Rosen said.

“I’m not a pain expert,” Mochly-Rosen says in our release on the Science Translational Medicine paper. “We hit this enzyme for a completely different reason. Hopefully this will help people who have pain.”

Alda-1 — coincidentally, Alda is also the name of Mochly-Rosen’s 87-year-old mother — works by knocking aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 into high gear. Say goodbye to the aldehydes, and goodbye to the pain.

Mochly-Rosen’s discovery of the link between pain and Alda-1 is a big deal for many reasons, including the suffering of thousands addicted to opioids such as Oxycontin. It’s also particularly meaningful for the millions in the Han Chinese ethnic group who suffer from alcohol flush.  They have a mutation in aldehyde hydrogenate 2, which makes it uncomfortable to drink alcohol and causes sufferers to turn red.

The inflammation is caused by the build-up of aldehydes, which are byproducts of alcohol. Alcohol-flush syndrome, as it’s sometimes called, has been recognized for decades.

The researchers created a mouse with a mutation akin to the enzyme mutation in humans. When they injected aldehydes into the mice, the mice with the mutation felt more pain than the other mice. And Alda-1 also relieved their pain.

Dribbles of evidence suggest some Asians are more sensitive to pain. Now, Mochly-Rosen and her team plan to investigate if the susceptibility stems from the enzyme mutation.

Becky Bach is a former park ranger who now spends her time writing, exploring, or practicing yoga. She’s currently a science writing intern in the medical school’s Office of Communication & Public Affairs.

Previously: Another big step toward building a better aspirin tablet, Blocking addiction risks of morphine without reducing its pain-killing effects, Patients’ genetics may play a role in determining side effects of commonly prescribed painkillers, and Stanford’s Sean Mackey discusses recent advances in pain research and treatment
Photo by Michelle Tribe/Wikimedia Commons

Applied Biotechnology, Ophthalmology, Public Health, Stanford News, Technology

Stanford-developed eye implant could work with smartphone to improve glaucoma treatments

Stanford-developed eye implant could work with smartphone to improve glaucoma treatments

eyeGlaucoma, caused by rising fluid pressure in the eyes, is known as the silent thief of sight. Catching the disease in the early stages is critical because if detected too late it leads to blindness. Regular monitoring and controlling of the disease once detected is invaluable.

Now, Stephen Quake, PhD, professor of bioengineering at Stanford, and Yossi Mandel, MD, PhD, an applied physics and ophthalmologist at Bar-Ilan University in Israel, have developed a tiny eye implant that would allow patients to take daily or hourly measurements of eye pressure from home.

A recent Stanford Report article explains how the device works:

It consists of a small tube – one end is open to the fluids that fill the eye; the other end is capped with a small bulb filled with gas. As the [internal optic pressure] increases, intraocular fluid is pushed into the tube; the gas pushes back against this flow.

As IOP fluctuates, the meniscus – the barrier between the fluid and the gas – moves back and forth in the tube. Patients could use a custom smartphone app or a wearable technology, such as Google Glass, to snap a photo of the instrument at any time, providing a critical wealth of data that could steer treatment. For instance, in one previous study, researchers found that 24-hour IOP monitoring resulted in a change in treatment in up to 80 percent of patients.

“For me, the charm of this is the simplicity of the device. Glaucoma is a substantial issue in human health. It’s critical to catch things before they go off the rails, because once you go off, you can go blind. If patients could monitor themselves frequently, you might see an improvement in treatments,” Quake added.

The full report (subscription required) is published in the current issue of Nature Medicine.

Previously: What I did this summer: Stanford medical student investigates early detection methods for glaucomaTo maintain good eyesight, make healthy vision a priority and Instagram for eyes: Stanford ophthalmologists develop low-cost device to ease image sharing
Photo by Magmiretoby

Aging, Autoimmune Disease, Immunology, Infectious Disease, Research, Stanford News

Our aging immune systems are still in business, but increasingly thrown out of balance

Our aging immune systems are still in business, but increasingly thrown out of balance

business as usual

Stanford immunologist Jorg Goronzy, MD, told me a few years ago that a person’s immune response declines slowly but surely starting at around age 40. “While 90 percent of young adults respond to most vaccines, after age 60 that response rate is down to around 40-45 percent,” he said. “With some vaccines, it’s as low as 20 percent.”

A shaky vaccine response isn’t the only immune-system slip-up. With advancing age, we grow increasingly vulnerable to infection (whether or not we’ve been vaccinated), autoimmune disease (an immune attack on our own tissues) and cancer (when a once well-behaved cell metamorphoses into a ceaselessly dividing one).

A new study led by Goronzy and published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests why that may come about. The culprit he and his colleagues have fingered turns out not to be the most likely suspect: the thymus.

This all-important organ’s job is to nurture an army of specialized  immune cells called T cells. (The “T” is for “Thymus.”) T cells are capable of recognizing and mounting an immune response to an unbelievably large number of different molecular shapes, including ones found only on invading pathogens or on our own cells when they morph into incipient tumor cells.

Exactly which feature a given T cell recognizes depends on the structure of a receptor molecule carried in abundance on that T cell’s surface.  Although each T cell sports just one receptor type, in the aggregate the number of different shapes T-cells recognize is gigantic, due to a high rate of reshuffling and mutation in the genes dictating their receptors’ makeup. (Stanford immunologist Mark Davis, PhD, perhaps more than any other single individual,  figured out in the early 1980s how this all works.)

T cells don’t live forever, and their generation from scratch completely depends on the thymus. Yet by our early teens the organ,  situated  in front of the lungs at the midpoint of our chest, starts shriveling up and replaced by (sigh – you knew this was coming)  fat tissue.

After the thymus melts away,  new T-cells come into being only when already-existing ones undergo cell division, for example to compensate for the attrition of their neighbors in one or another immune-system dormitory (such as bone marrow, spleen or a lymph node).

It’s been thought that the immune-system’s capacity to recognize and mount a response to pathogens (or incipient tumors) fades away because with age-related T-cell loss comes a corresponding erosion of diversity:  We just run out of T-cells with the appropriate receptors.

The new study found otherwise.  “Our study shows that the diversity of the human T-cell receptor repertoire is much higher than previously assumed, somewhere in the range of one billion different receptor types,” Goronzy says. “Any age-associated loss in diversity is trivial.” But the study also showed an increasing imbalance, with some subgroups of T cells (characterized by genetically identical  receptors)  hogging the show and other subgroups becoming vanishingly scarce.

The good news is that the players in an immune response are all still there, even in old age. How to restore that lost balance is the question.

Previously: How to amp up an aging immune response, Age-related drop in immune responsiveness may be reversible and Deja vu: Adults’ immune systems “remember” microscopic monsters they’ve never seen before
Photo by Lars Plougmann

Medicine and Literature, Orthopedics, Patient Care, Pediatrics, Stanford News

From post-WWII Russia To 7-year-old Giana Brown, a limb-lengthening method evolves

From post-WWII Russia To 7-year-old Giana Brown, a limb-lengthening method evolves

young patientGiana Brown is one tough little girl. When she was 7 years old, an orthopedic surgeon, Jeffrey Young, MD, from Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, placed a brace called a Taylor Spatial Frame on her lower left leg that would help lengthen it about three inches to match her right leg. To accomplish this, the brace would require adjustments of about one millimeter a day for more than six months.

Her parents could have made those adjustments, but Giana insisted on doing it herself. She used a little wrench to turn the knobs that would lengthen the struts on the brace according to a computer-generated, color-coded prescription sheet.

Sculpting Bones,” the story of Giana’s rare bone disorder, her surgery and her recovery, is featured in this summer’s edition of Stanford Medicine magazine. An animated graphic illustrates in detail how the brace and bone biology work together to lengthen limbs. The story focuses not only the remarkable method of cutting a bone and slowly lengthening the gap to allow it to grow — called “distraction osteogensis” — but also on the unusual history of the “external fixator” device that makes this growth possible.

The device originated in a remote region of Siberia, Russia, nearly 70 years ago, where a young doctor, Gavriil Ilizarov, MD, cared for a patient population that included soldiers returning from the front lines of World War II with a vast array of bone injuries. Ilizarov discovered his method of distraction osteogenesis by accident, and a revolutionary method of bone lengthening was born.

Several decades later, orthopedic surgeon Charles Taylor, MD, and his brother, engineer Harold Taylor, modernized the device, changing the angle of the struts for more flexibility, and creating a computer program that generated prescriptions, “accurate to within a millionth of an inch and a ten-thousandth of a degree,” for adjusting the struts daily.

Although Giana’s dad, Greg, accurately describes the device as “draconian-looking,” her surgeon, Young, hails it as an ideal tool for healing his pediatric patients. “I really like how the technology allows me to basically sculpt the bone,” he says. “It’s the perfect blend of engineering and art.”

For Giana Brown, the accuracy, simplicity, and artistry of the device has paid off: She’s back to running and playing with her friends the way a healthy, happy kid should. Read her story – and her tips for making life a little easier in the frame -  here.

Previously: Stanford Medicine magazine opens up the world of surgery
Photo of Giana Brown by Max Aguilera-Hellweg

Genetics, Medicine and Society, Pain, Research, Science, Stanford News

From plant to pill: Bioengineers aim to produce opium-based medicines without using poppies

From plant to pill: Bioengineers aim to produce opium-based medicines without using poppies

Basic RGBStanford bioengineer Christina Smolke, PhD, and her team have been on a decade-long mission to replicate how nature produces opium in poppies by genetically engineering the DNA of yeast and then further refining the process to manufacture modern day opioid drugs such as morphine, codeine and the well-known painkiller Vicodin.

Smolke outlined the methods in a report  (subscription required) published in this week’s edition of Nature Chemical Biology, which details the latest stages in the process of manufacturing opium-based medicines, from start to finish, in fermentation vats, similar to the process for brewing beer.

An article published today in the Stanford Report offers more details:

It takes about 17 separate chemical steps to make the opioid compounds used in pills. Some of these steps occur naturally in poppies and the remaining via synthetic chemical processes in factories. Smolke’s team wanted all the steps to happen inside yeast cells within a single vat, including using yeast to carry out chemical processes that poppies never evolved to perform – such as refining opiates like thebaine into more valuable semi-synthetic opioids like oxycodone.

So Smolke programmed her bioengineered yeast to perform these final industrial steps as well. To do this she endowed the yeast with genes from a bacterium that feeds on dead poppy stalks. Since she wanted to produce several different opioids, her team hacked the yeast genome in slightly different ways to produce each of the slightly different opioid formulations, such as oxycodone or hydrocodone.

“We are now very close to replicating the entire opioid production process in a way that eliminates the need to grow poppies, allowing us to reliably manufacture essential medicines while mitigating the potential for diversion to illegal use,” Smolke added.

While it could take several more years to refine these last steps in the lab, bioengineering opioids would eventually lead to less dependence on legal poppy farming, which has numerous restrictions and international dependencies from other countries. It would also provide a reliable supply and secure process for manufacturing important pain killing drugs.

Previously: Blocking addiction risks of morphine without reducing its pain-killing effects, Do opium and opioids increase mortality risk? and Patients’ genetics may play a role in determining side effects of commonly prescribed painkillers 
Photo by Kate Thodey and Stephanie Galanie

Behavioral Science, In the News, Sleep, Stanford News

“Sleep drunkenness” more prevalent than previously thought

"Sleep drunkenness" more prevalent than previously thought

sleep_drunkennessA phenomenon known as “sleep drunkenness” may be more prevalent than previously thought, affecting as many as 1 in 7 adults, Stanford researchers report in a new study. That means as many as 36 million Americans experience this potentially problematic sleep condition, in which they are awakened suddenly in a confused state and may be prone to inappropriate behavior, poor decision-making, or even violence.

In interviews with nearly 16,000 adults aged 18 to 102, the researchers found that within the previous year, 15.2 percent had experienced the condition, also known as confusional arousal, with more than half saying they had at least one episode a week.

Stanford psychiatrist and sleep expert Maurice Ohayon, MD, DSc, PhD, said he was surprised at the extent of the problem and particularly the length of time that people reported feeling confused and disoriented following a sudden awakening, whether at night or from a daytime nap.

“I was thinking maybe 30 seconds, a minute or two minutes,” Ohayon told me. “When you ask people, 60 percent said it lasted more than 5 minutes. And one third said it was 15 minutes or more. A lot of things can happen in that time.

“The concern is that people in a job of security, such as engineer, may misjudge the situation because their memory is impaired. Their judgment is not taking into account the environment around them, so they will probably have a bad response. The response will not be adapted to the environment,” said Ohayon, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and the study’s first author.

He noted that the 1979 Three Mile Island nuclear disaster, the worst nuclear incident in U.S. history, was exacerbated in part by poor decision-making on the part of an engineer who had been awakened suddenly from a nap. He also cautioned that airline pilots, who may nap during a break, may not be efficient for 5 or 10 minutes after being awakened and should take their time before resuming control of an aircraft.

Among those who are most prone to the condition are those with sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea or those who sleep less than 6 hours or more than 9 hours a night, as well as people with certain psychiatric disorders, such as major depression, anxiety and alcohol dependence, the researchers found. Ohayon said he was surprised to discover a strong link between the condition and the use of antidepressants, which likely modify sleep architecture and may contribute to a greater incidence of the condition. Though there is a common perception that people who take sleep medications to help them fall asleep may be confused when they wake up, that was not found to be the case, he said.

More than a third of the people in the study who experienced confusional arousal also said they had hallucinations, and 14.8 percent reported sleep-walking, sometimes accompanied by violent behavior.

“People during confusional arousal can become violent because they are awakened suddenly,” Ohayon said. “They are not happy. They are confused. They may feel aggression toward their partner or the people who have awakened them.”

He said people who experience frequent episodes of confusional arousal should consult with a physician for evaluation and possible treatment. And he urged further study of the problem, which has received little scientific attention.

The study appears in the August 26 issue of the journal Neurology.

Photo by katiecooperx

Autoimmune Disease, Evolution, Immunology, Microbiology, Nutrition, Public Health, Stanford News

Civilization and its dietary (dis)contents: Do modern diets starve our gut-microbial community?

Civilization and its dietary (dis)contents: Do modern diets starve our gut-microbial community?

hunter-gatherer cafe

Our genes have evolved a bit over the last 50,000 years of human evolution, but our diets have evolved a lot. That’s because civilization has transitioned from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle to an agrarian and, more recently and incompletely, to an industrialized one. These days, many of us are living in an information-intensive, symbol-analyzing, button-pushing, fast-food-munching society. This transformation has been accompanied by consequential twists and turns regarding what we eat, and how and when we eat it.

Toss in antibiotics, sedentary lifestyles, and massive improvements in public sanitation and personal hygiene, and now you’re talking about serious shake-ups in how many and which microbes we get exposed to – and how many of which ones wind up inhabiting our gut.

In a review published in Cell Metabolism, Stanford married-microbiologist couple Justin Sonnenburg, PhD, and Erica Sonnenburg, PhD, warn that modern civilization and its dietary contents may be putting our microbial gut communities, and our health, at risk.

[S]tudies in recent years have implicated [dysfunctional gut-bug communities] in a growing list of Western diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, and cancer. … The major dietary shifts occurring between the hunter-gatherer lifestyle, early Neolithic farming, and more recently during the Industrial Revolution are reflected in changes in microbial membership within dental tartar of European skeletons throughout these periods. … Traditional societies typically have much lower rates of Western diseases.

Every healthy human harbors an interactive internal ecosystem consisting of something like 1,000 species of intestinal microbes.  As individuals, these resident Lilliputians may be tiny, but what they lack in size they make up in number. Down in the lower part of your large intestine dwell tens of trillions of  single-celled creatures – a good 10 of them for every one of yours. If you could put them all on a scale, they would cumulatively weigh about four pounds. (Your brain weighs three.)

Together they do great things. In a Stanford Medicine article I wrote a few years back, “Caution: Do Not Debug,” I wrote:

The communities of micro-organisms lining or swimming around in our body cavities … work hard for their living. They synthesize biomolecules that manipulate us in ways that are helpful to both them and us. They produce vitamins, repel pathogens, trigger key aspects of our physiological development, educate our immune system, help us digest our food and for the most part get along so well with us and with one other that we forget they’re there.

But when our internal microbes don’t get enough of the right complex carbohydrates (ones we can’t digest and so pass along to our neighbors downstairs), they may be forced to subsist on the fleece of long carbohydrate chains (some call it “mucus”)  lining and guarding the intestinal wall. Weakening that barrier could encourage inflammation.

The Sonnenburgs note that certain types of fatty substances are overwhelmingly the product of carbohydrate fermentation by gut microbes. These substances have been shown to exert numerous anti-inflammatory effects in the body, possibly protecting against asthma and eczema: two allergic conditions seems oddly correlated with the degree to which the environment a child grows up in is spotlessly hygienic and whose incidence has soared in developed countries.

Previously: Joyride: Brief post-antibiotic sugar spike gives pathogens a lift, The future of probiotics and Researchers manipulate microbes in the gut
Photo by geraldbrazell

Events, Medical Apps, Medicine X, Stanford News, Technology

Countdown to Medicine X: Specially designed apps to enhance attendees’ conference experience

Countdown to Medicine X: Specially designed apps to enhance attendees’ conference experience

Figure 3 - BlanketLast year’s Stanford Medicine X conference explored ways in which technology could be used to augment the attendees’ experiences. During breaks between sessions, organizers used specially developed software to transform television screens set up in the lobby outside the main auditorium into interactive spaces where participants could exchange ideas. On one screen, attendees used their mobile phones to text their reflections on previous sessions or respond to prompts such as: “What’s your dream for health care?” The texts appeared as yellow sticky notes on a virtual corkboard. Another screen served as a digital journal where participants could text comments about what they learned and have them displayed to a wider audience. As people walked up to the screen to read the contextually relevant content, they naturally started conversations. In an effort to bridge the divide between the people who were physically present at the conference and those who were watching the live-stream from other locations, an additional screen broadcast tweets from around the world in real time.

This year, conference organizers have developed three iPhone apps for Medicine X based on Apple iBeacon, a Bluetooth-powered location system. “When we heard about the iBeacon technology, it was clear that it would fit really well into a conference setting as well as being useful for allowing people to interact with the large-screen displays,” said Michael Fischer, a PhD student in computer science in the MobiSocial Lab at Stanford, who helped develop the app. “We brainstormed all the possible ways that the iBeacon technology could help people participate in the conference and came up with some ideas that we are excited to test out at the upcoming conference.”

In anticipation of this year’s conference, I reached out to Fischer to learn more about how the apps will further enhance attendees’ experience at Medicine X. Below he explains how they will facilitate networking among participants, allow them to provide feedback or rate speakers and serve as a sort of “flight-attendant call button.”

Can you briefly explain how the apps work?

One app allows us to extend the Wellness Room, so that people can request items without having to go to the room and miss part of a session. The Wellness Room provides special amenities, such as warm blankets or a place to rest, to assist patients in managing their conditions during the conference. The room was designed to help patients physically attend the conference who might have otherwise not been able to. For example, a previous ePatient attendee had a medical condition called cryoglobulinemia, which causes proteins known as cryoglobulins to thicken if the ambient temperature drops too low. If this were to occur, it could lead to kidney failure and would be life threatening. So it’s crucial for this patient to keep warm. Using the iBeacon technology we were able to develop a system that allows people to use an iPhone to request a blanket or other item be delivered to their seat. There will be iBeacons on all the tables in the room so that the phone will automatically know where you are sitting. All the requests will be forwarded to a volunteer who will bring the item directly to the table.

Another app will be used during the breaks to help people get to know each other. The application works by displaying short bios on a nearby TV screen. In this way, the screen acts as a type of watering hole that people can gather around. When new people approach, their bios will be added to the screen. When a person leaves the proximity of the screen, the bio will be removed. We’ll have multiple screens set up around the conference. Our hope is that people can find a group that they might not yet be familiar with. The service is opt-in and people can switch to and from stealth mode at any time. Conference-goers will also have the option to forgo this app altogether.

Lastly, we have developed a feature that will be used at check-in. We want to create an experience that will surprise and delight people from the moment they step into the conference. There is a tradition at Stanford during freshman year that when you first come to your dorm, the dorm staff yells out your name. It is pretty big surprise and makes you feel part of the community instantly. We wanted to replicate that experience as best we could for the conference.

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Medicine and Literature, Stanford News, Surgery

A surgeon battles her own unexpected complications

A surgeon battles her own unexpected complications

I first interviewed Stanford surgeon Sherry Wren, MD, a year and a half ago for an article about a course she taught to other surgeons on global health care. Based on her personal experience from medical missions to Chad, Congo and Ivory Coast, it was obvious the course was a labor of love. Here was a surgeon who was passionate about her work, and whose goal it was to overcome any and all obstacles to save patients – from using papaya paste for wound dressing to hand drills for relieving brain bleeds. She made use of a combination of her surgical skills, her physical strength and her love for her work to accomplish her goals. “You have no idea how physically hard it is to crank a six-millimeter pin into someone’s femur with a hand drill,” she told me then. “And I’m strong.”

When Wren mentioned off-hand that she was still recovering from post-surgical paralysis after her own neck surgery, I knew there was another story waiting to be told. Almost two years later, that story about Wren’s struggle to return to surgery following the partial paralysis of one of her most important tools, her left hand, has been published in Stanford Medicine magazine. My colleague Paul Costello referenced it here earlier this month.

This is a story about a surgeon experiencing what it’s like to be on the other side of the scalpel when something goes horribly wrong. In the piece, she describes what she felt upon waking up following neck surgery:

My left hand was like a claw. I couldn’t lift my left knee. Then my surgeon came to see me, and I recognized that ‘Oh shit!’ look on his face, because I’ve had that ‘Oh shit!’ look many times.”

Wren, who injured her spine following a deep-sea diving shipwreck, also talks of her struggle to return to the demanding, 10-14 hours surgeries that she excels at despite lingering damage to her left hand and the accompanying depression that blindsided her. I wrote:

It was the correct diagnosis. The correct treatment. There was no surgical error. And yet somehow, the veteran surgeon who makes a living with her hands woke up partially paralyzed. The unexpected complications included paralysis of her left hand and her left leg, and a weakened right hand. Already she thinks, Will I still be able to operate? Already she thinks, What am I if I’m not a surgeon?

This is Wren’s very personal story, one that she tells open and honestly. The experience of being the patient has made her a better physician, she said. And it’s a story that she hopes by telling, others can learn from.

“I thought a lot about whether I wanted to share this story,” Wren said. I, for one, am appreciative that she did.

Previously: Sherry Wren, MD – a surgeon’s road home, Surgery: Up close and personal, Stanford Medicine magazine opens up the world of surgery Surgery: Up close and personal and Stanford general surgeon discusses the importance of surgery in global health care

From August 11-25, Scope will be on a limited publishing schedule. During that time, you may also notice a delay in comment moderation. We’ll return to our regular schedule on August 25.

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