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Applied Biotechnology, Clinical Trials, FDA, Research, Stanford News

An inside look at drug development

An inside look at drug development

B0008664 Assorted pills, tablets and capsules

How are drugs born? If you’re really curious about this, you’d be fascinated by the weekly meetings of industry experts and academic researchers taking part in Stanford’s drug-development training program known as SPARK.

A recently published book, A Practical Guide to Drug Development in Academia, crystallizes the sessions. Even if you’re not a scientist dreaming of curing cancer with your latest discovery, you might find it interesting.

In his recent review of the book for Nature Chemical Biology, industrial medicinal chemist Derek Lowe, PhD, writes:

I would actually welcome it if this book’s intended audience were broadened even more. Younger scientists starting out in the drug industry would benefit from reading it and getting some early exposure to parts of the process that they’ll eventually have to understand. Journalists covering the industry (especially the small startup companies) will find this book a good reality check for many an over-hopeful press release. Even advanced investors who might want to know what really happens in the labs will find information here that might otherwise be difficult to track down in such a concentrated form.

Lowe also wrote about the book last week on his blog, In the Pipeline, where an interesting discussion has begun.

Previously: SPARK program helps researchers cross the “valley of death” between drug discovery and development and Accelerating the translation of biomedical research into clinical applications.
Photograph from Wellcome Images

Medical Education, Medical Schools, Stanford News, Surgery

After work, a Stanford surgeon brings stones to life

After work, a Stanford surgeon brings stones to life

MA15_Profs_Greco_480pxClassrooms, research, grant writing, faculty meetings… It can be easy to forget that professors have a life outside of the classroom, perhaps with surprising hobbies and talents. The new issue of Stanford Magazine highlights the extra-professional lives of some of the university’s extraordinary professors, including Ralph Greco, MD.

Greco is a sculptor of stone as well as a surgeon. His work decorates his home and has sold for as much as $8,500. Perhaps his most notable sculpture is the abstract “S” that graces the Department of Surgery. He created the work of art from a 400-pound marble boulder that was gifted to him at a graduation dinner when he was the director of the general surgery residency program.

It’s perhaps not surprising that the multi-faceted Greco is an advocate for work-life balance among surgeons. He established a support program after the suicide of a surgical resident, and because he says sculpting can be “too self centered,” he pursues other interests as well. Check out the article to learn more.

Previously: Program for residents reflects “massive change” in surgeon mentality and New surgeons take time out for mental health
Photo by Nicolo Sertorio

Global Health, Mental Health, Research, Stanford News

Study explores how cultural differences can shape the way we respond to suffering

Study explores how cultural differences can shape the way we respond to suffering

8909380232_a647e15c23_zOur emotions may be a deeply personal experience, but the way we perceive and express our feelings may not be as unique – or random – as we think. According to recent research, culture influences the way some Americans and Germans convey their mood. If this is universally true, it could mean that people of the same culture tend to express their feelings in similar ways.

As this Stanford Report story explains, researchers Jeanne Tsai, PhD, an associate professor of psychology, and Birgit Koopmann-Holm, PhD, a German citizen who earned her doctorate in Tsai’s lab, noticed that Americans of European decent and Germans seemed to differ in the way they express feelings of sympathy:

Americans tend to emphasize the positive when faced with tragedy or life-threatening situations. American culture arguably considers negativity, complaining and pessimism as somewhat “sinful,” [Tsai] added.

Unlike when Americans talk about illness, Germans primarily focus on the negative, Tsai and Koopmann-Holm wrote. For example, the “Sturm und Drang” (“Storm and Drive”) literary and musical movement in 18th-century Germany went beyond merely accepting negative emotions to actually glorifying them.

This seemingly simple observation could have important societal implications, the researchers explain: Studies show that empathy affects our willingness to help someone who is suffering. But, as noted in the article, “until now, Tsai said, no studies have specifically examined how culture shapes ‘different ways in which sympathy, compassion or other feelings of concern for another’s suffering might be expressed.'”

In their study (subscription required, pdf here), published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the researchers conducted four separate experiments on 525 undergraduate students in the U.S. and Germany to see if Americans accentuate the positive more than Germans do when expressing their condolences. The students were asked how they would feel in a variety of hypothetical situations (such as a scenario where a friend lost a loved one), what feelings they would want to avoid and how they would select and rate sympathy cards.
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Bioengineering, Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford News, Technology

Following the heart and the mind in biodesign

Following the heart and the mind in biodesign

This post is part of the Biodesign’s Jugaad series following a group of Stanford Biodesign fellows from India. (Jugaad is a Hindi word that means an inexpensive, innovative solution.) The fellows will spend months immersed in the interdisciplinary environment of Stanford Bio-X, learning the Biodesign process of researching clinical needs and prototyping a medical device. The Biodesign program is now in its 14th year, and past fellows have successfully launched 36 companies focused on developing devices for unmet medical needs.

15125593898_7ee05d0a60_zWhen I showed up to meet with the Biodesign fellows, Debayan Saha greeted me by saying, “We are arguing – please join us.”

The source of the argument turned out to be a thorny one. The team had previously attended cardiovascular disease clinics and from those visits identified more than 300 possible needs that, if addressed, might improve patient care.

Now, their job was to narrow down those 300+ needs to the one they would eventually develop a prototype device to address.

Part of the process Stanford Biodesign fellows learn is a rigorous method for identifying medical needs that also make business sense to address. The first step: eliminate the duds.

In this round, the each team member had individually rated the needs according to their individual levels of interest on a scale of 1 to 4. That interest could reflect the fact that they think the technology is interesting, or the fact that the need is one they would be excited about addressing.

Now they were trying to rate the needs on the same 1 to 4 scale according to the number of people who would benefit if it were addressed. The combination of these two ratings—one subjective and the other objective—would produce a shorter list of needs that were both of interest to the fellows and would benefit enough people that any future company could be successful

That objective rating was the source of the polite disagreement I had walked into. As one example, if a particular need applied to people who had a stroke, should they assume that all people who have had a stroke would benefit from a solution (giving the need a higher rating of 4), or would only a small subset benefit (giving the need a lower rating of 1 or 2)?

By and large Harsh Sheth, MD, leaned toward 4s while Shashi Ranjan, PhD, leaned toward 2s. Saha mostly just leaned back. Much discussion ensued.

In the end the team managed to assign a single score indicating the number of people represented by each need. When combined with their subjective scores, the group was able to eliminate the lowest scoring needs and reduce the list to a mere 133.

One interesting thing I learned is that this careful rubric is harder to apply in India, where good numbers about how many people have particular conditions are harder to come by. Ranjan told me that even in India they would likely use U.S. numbers for some conditions and just scale up to the Indian population. I mentally added this lack of good data to the list of reasons Stanford-India Biodesign Program executive director (U.S.) Rajiv Doshi, MD, told me that biodesign is more challenging in India.

Previously: Writing a “very specific sentence” is critical for good biodesign and Good medical technology starts with patients’ needs
Photo by Yasmeen

Cancer, Global Health, Patient Care, Stanford News

New global cancer map aims to improve care in developing countries

New global cancer map aims to improve care in developing countries

cancer map2

Most people don’t associate cancer with the developing world, yet 60 percent of new cancer cases and 70 percent of cancer deaths occur in less developed parts of the world, according to the World Health Organization. Now, the nonprofit Global Oncology, Inc. has launched a Global Cancer Project Map, a first-of-its-kind resource that will connect cancer experts around the world in an effort to advance cancer research and care in low-resource areas.

The interactive map includes more than 800 projects on six continents. With a few simple clicks, users can search for cancer experts and research projects and then contact the investigators and program managers. The goal is to spur collaboration among people in the field and enable experts to share their collective knowledge.

“Before it was difficult or often impossible to find information about cancer projects or experts, especially in limited-resource settings,” said Ami S. Bhatt, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of medicine and genetics at Stanford and co-founder of Global Oncology, Inc. “The map now makes it possible to connect colleagues in the global cancer community with a maximum of six clicks of a computer mouse.”

Bhatt, who directs global oncology for Stanford’s Center for Innovation in Global Health, and GO co-founder Franklin Huang, MD, PhD, have been working with the National Cancer Institute on ways to bring multidisciplinary teams together to solve complex problems in cancer. While there are many dedicated scientists and caregivers doing innovative work in cancer in the developing world, there’s been no single place where they could share knowledge or reference the work of their colleagues, she said. The cancer map is a first step in this process.

“We have the ambitious goal of providing access to every cancer research, care and outreach program in the world through the map,” said Huang, who is an instructor at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

A collaboration with the NCI, the map was developed by GO volunteers, who are scientists, policymakers, public health experts, lawyers and other highly skilled individuals. It covers a wide range of projects, from prevention and screening to clinical programs and palliative care. For instance, it includes a project in Turkey to improve diagnostic accuracy of mammograms to detect breast cancer; development of an early screening test for gastric cancer in Mexico; and use of supplements to prevent arsenic-induced skin cancer in Bangladesh.

“The map is an important and innovative step forward in our effort to reduce health disparities and strengthen human capital in underserved areas of the world,” said Michele Barry, MD, director of Stanford’s Center for Innovation in Global Health. “With cancer rates rapidly increasing in low-resource settings, the map creates a place where the global cancer community can share and access information that is critical to providing better treatment and care.”

Bhatt and Huang unveiled the new map today at the Symposium on Global Cancer Research, being held in Boston. The symposium is co-sponsored by the NCI, the Consortium of Universities for Global Health and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

Image from Global Oncology, Inc.

Aging, Genetics, Research, Science, Stanford News

“Are we there yet?” Exploring the promise, and the hype, of longevity research

"Are we there yet?" Exploring the promise, and the hype, of longevity research

Brunet photoThe days are getting longer, and it’s no longer dark outside when I drop my teenager at school for her early-bird class. I appreciate the light, of course, and there’s something soothing about the rhythmic change of seasons.

If only we could extend our lifespan in a similar gentle, reliable manner.

The idea of living longer, and healthier, is the theme of my story for the new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine. It’s my favorite kind of article – a dash of juicy science history, a panoply of dedicated scientists and a brand-new animal model (and my newest crush) that may open all kinds of research doors. Best of all, there’s a sense of real progress in the field. From my article:

“Ways of prolonging human life span are now within the realm of possibility,” says professor of genetics and newbie fish keeper Anne Brunet, PhD. Brunet, who is an associate director of Stanford’s Paul F. Glenn Center for the Biology of Aging, focuses her research on genes that control the aging process in animals such as the minnowlike African killifish I’d watched fiercely guarding his territory.

The killifish is especially important to researchers like Brunet because it has an extremely variable, albeit short, life span. One strain from eastern Zimbabwe completes its entire life cycle — birth, maturity, reproduction and death — within about three to four months. Another strain can live up to nine months.

It’s also a vertebrate, meaning it belongs to the same branch of the evolutionary tree as humans. This gives it a backbone up over more squishy models of aging like fruit flies or roundworms — translucent, 1-millimeter-long earth dwellers you could probably find in your compost pile if you felt like digging.

I hope you’ll read the rest of my piece to learn more.

Previously: My funny Valentine – or, how a tiny fish will change the world of aging research, Stanford Medicine magazine reports on time’s intersection with health and Living loooooooonger: A conversation on longevity
Photo of Anne Brunet by Gregg Segal

Patient Care, Pregnancy, Stanford News, Women's Health

New obstetric hemorrhage tool kit released today

New obstetric hemorrhage tool kit released today

pregnantbelly-3A few years ago, when my niece was born, my sister had a severe postpartum hemorrhage. I remember getting off the phone with my mom, who had just delivered the simultaneous news of the baby’s birth and my sister’s serious condition, and feeling terrified. My sister was being taken into surgery to try to stop the bleeding. What if she died? In the U.S., deaths from postpartum hemorrhage are rare, but they do happen.

The first thing that gave me a sense of reassurance, strangely, was a search of the medical database PubMed. After I got off the phone, I sat at my laptop looking at a multicolored flow chart that summarized how to stop an obstetric hemorrhage. All of the steps taken by my sister’s medical team were listed. Although she was hundreds of miles away, I felt comforted by the knowledge that her doctors were following well-established, evidence-based guidelines for what to do.

It wasn’t until a few minutes later that I realized the flow chart was developed by doctors I know. It was part of the Obstetric Hemorrhage Toolkit, a set of guidelines published by the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative (CMQCC). I had first heard of the toolkit from a Stanford obstetric anesthesiologist who helped put it together, but had never imagined it might save someone in my family.

The toolkit was developed because maternal hemorrhages are rare, risky, and extremely time-sensitive. The kit gives medical teams the information they need to rehearse for, recognize and treat these hemorrhages immediately, without wasting minutes that could save the patient’s life.

Today, the CMQCC is releasing a new version of the toolkit. The update strengthens several areas of the kit, providing clearer parameters for use of certain medications and blood products and more information about how to support patients and families after a maternal hemorrhage, for instance.

And the flow chart I found calming is still there, on page 21 of this .pdf file. I’m so happy to see it again because, for me, it symbolizes the doctors, patients and families who will benefit from the kit in the future.

As for my family’s story, my mom called back later on the evening of my niece’s birth to tell me that the bleeding had stopped and my sister was recovering. Her introduction to motherhood was rougher than most, but today my sister and her daughter are fine: My favorite moment of a recent family gathering was seeing my chubby-cheeked niece racing toward me yelling “Aunnnnntie Errrrin!” with my beloved sister in hot pursuit behind her.

Previously: In poorest countries, increase in midwives could save mothers and their babies, Cardiac arrest in pregnancy: New consensus statement addresses CPR for expectant moms and Program focuses on treatment of placental disorders
Photo by bies

Events, Pediatrics, Public Health, Research, Stanford News

Countdown to Childx: Q&A with pediatric health expert Alan Guttmacher

Countdown to Childx: Q&A with pediatric health expert Alan Guttmacher

jumpforjoyIt’s just a few weeks until the inaugural Childx conference, a TED-style meeting at Stanford that will highlight innovations in health problems of pregnancy, infancy and childhood. (Conference registration for the April 2-3 event is still open, with details available on the conference website.) Childx is attracting nationally and internationally prominent speakers: keynotes will be given by Alan Guttmacher, MD, head of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and by Rajiv Shah, MD, former head of USAID.

I spoke recently with Guttmacher about the upcoming conference. Because I spend most of my time working with scientists who focus their attention on specific research niches within obstetric and pediatric medicine, I was interested in getting his take on the “big picture” of these fields. An edited version of our conversation is below.

What are you planning to say in your keynote address at the Childx conference?

Children’s lives are about more than just health. While biomedical research is crucial to improving kids’ lives, we should put it in the larger context of kids’ lives and do not just research that has an impact on health, but also on children’s overall well-being.

Within the health sphere, I’ll talk about several areas where we need more research. We need to study how to do a better job of preventing prematurity, both to gain a better understanding of biological and environmental causes of preterm birth, and also of how to do a better job of employing the knowledge we already have.

Another topic I’ll address is vaccination: How do we both pursue the science of vaccination to figure out how to make more vaccines more effective, and also, how do we work with parents so they make decisions about kids’ lives that are in the best interests of the kids and are evidence based, rather than based on, say, something they recently read on the web?

I’ll also discuss the developmental origins of health and disease. Pediatricians have always been very invested in anticipatory guidance, telling families about the kinds of things to do to prevent future disease for their children. But this goes farther; this is the idea that health factors, not only in childhood but even in utero, have lifelong impact on health. For instance, what happens in pregnancy potentially has large impact on whether someone develops hypertension in their 60s or 70s. We’re beginning to do science that will tell us the connections between early factors and later health, that will actually influence health along the entire age span. It’s an area of very important research.

And I’ll address intellectual and developmental disabilities. We need research to figure out how to more effectively prevent intellectual and developmental disabilities, research to understand how to allow kids who have these disabilities to function more effectively in society, and also research to figure out how to have society function better in the lives of kids with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

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Events, In the News, Medical Education, Medical Schools, Stanford News

Match Day at Stanford sizzles with successful matches & good cheer

Match Day at Stanford sizzles with successful matches & good cheer

Rowza Rumma, hugs Jennifer DeCoste-Lopez, at Match Day 2015 at Stanford School of Medicine on March 20, 2015. ( Norbert von der Groeben/Stanford School of Medicine )Across the country at the exact same time — 9 AM in California — on the third Friday in March, graduating medical students assemble for Match Day, the day they receive their assignments to residencies.

It’s a spectacle — a cross between a graduation celebration replete with champagne and balloons and a theater audition with tears and heartbreak. The Stanford students, no surprise, are top-notch, so there were more grins than groans and plenty of congratulations and good cheer for all.

The stats themselves stand out: 77 students were matched Friday and they’re heading to 14 states, with California and Massachusetts leading the list. (A map showing where everyone is headed is below.) General medicine is the most popular specialty, followed by anesthesia, neurosurgery and pediatrics. No Stanford students were matched in urology, radiology and psychiatry.

Before the event, I checked in with two graduating students, Mia Kanak and Rowza Tur Rumma. Both are accomplished health professionals with interesting backgrounds and plans to make the world a better place. Kanak is a Tokyo native who hopes to help impoverished children. Rumma wants to translate the success of the world’s best operating rooms into practices that work in the poorest nations.

As I wrote in a story:

For [Rumma], the day was both exciting and nerve-wracking. “I think it’s hard to not have the jambalaya of those issues in our minds,” she said. Clutching the red envelope and a cell phone, she was dialing repeatedly, trying to get in touch with her parents in Bangladesh to share the moment with them.

Finally, her father on the phone, Rumma slit open the envelope, a relieved grin spreading across her face. “It’s Brigham,” she said, her first choice. Brigham and Women’s Hospital offers opportunities for its surgical residents to specialize in global health, just the program Tur Rumma was hoping for. For the residency, she was interviewed by Atul Gawande, the well-known author and surgeon, and was able to discuss her work during a summer program in Bangladesh, where she worked to implement — and adapt — a checklist of steps to reduce surgical complications adopted by the World Health Organization.

Kanak also secured her first choice, a berth in the Boston Children’s Hospital‘s pediatrics program.

“I want to say how proud all of us at Stanford Medicine are of your accomplishments today,” Dean Lloyd Minor, MD, told the group after envelopes had been torn open. “And now, on behalf of everyone, a toast to your success, to the impact you’re going to have on the lives of so many people moving forward: Best wishes!”

View Stanford Residency Match Day 2015 in a full screen map

Previously: Stanford Medicine’s Match Day, in pictures, It’s Match Day: Good luck, medical students!, At Match Day 2014, Stanford med students take first steps as residents and Image of the Week: Match Day 2012
Photo of Rowza Tur Rumma by Norbert von der Groeben; map by Kris Newby

Clinical Trials, In the News, Research, Stanford News, Technology

Lights, camera, action: Stanford cardiologist discusses MyHeart Counts on ABC’s Nightline

Lights, camera, action: Stanford cardiologist discusses MyHeart Counts on ABC's Nightline

GMA shoot - 560

Apple’s new ResearchKit, and Stanford Medicine’s MyHeart Counts iPhone app, were highlighted on ABC’s Nightline on Friday. Michael McConnell, MD, professor of cardiovascular medicine and principal investigator for the MyHeart Counts study, was interviewed, telling business correspondent Rebecca Jarvis around the 4-minute mark that the app will “definitely” change the way his job works. “It gives us a whole new way to do research,” he explained. “Traditionally reaching many people to participate in research studies is quite challenging. The ability to reach people through their phone is one major advance.”

Previously: Build it (an easy way to join research studies) and the volunteers will comeMyHeart Counts app debuts with a splash and Stanford launches iPhone app to study heart health
Photo by Margarita Gallardo

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