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Clinical Trials, Health Policy, Research, Science Policy, Stanford News, Videos

New Stanford center aims to promote research excellence

New Stanford center aims to promote research excellence

Stanford has a new center, called the Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford, or METRICS for short, that will focus on ways to transform research practices to improve the reproducibility, efficiency and quality of scientific investigations.

When Stanford professor John Ioannidis, MD, DSc, discusses ideas on how METRICS might improve research quality, he points to the wealth of statistics within any newspaper’s sports section.

“Science needs as many ways to measure performance as sports do,” says Ioannidis. “More important, we need to find efficient approaches for enhancing this performance. There are many ideas on how to improve the efficiency of setting a research agenda, prioritizing research questions, optimizing study design, maximizing accuracy of information, minimizing biases, enhancing reporting of research, and aligning incentives and rewards so that research efforts become more successful. Possibly we can do better on all of these fronts.”

The center’s other co-director is Steven Goodman, MD, MHS, PhD, professor of medicine and of health research and policy.

METRICS’s core group of interdisciplinary scholars will be working on various aspects of meta-research, from methodologies to processes to policy. The center will also provide educational funding for students and scholars; organize collaborative working groups that include academics, policymakers, research funders and the public; and help establish similar initiatives worldwide.

You can learn more about “meta-research” and METRICS’s mission in the short interview above and in this release. Ioannidis discusses the center’s short- and long-term goals in the video clip below.

Previously: The Lancet documents waste in research, proposes solutions, “US effect” leads to publication of biased research, says Stanford’s John Ioannidis and Shaky evidence moves animal studies to humans, according to Stanford-led study
Photo in featured-entry box by Norbert Von Der Groeben

Dermatology, Health Costs, In the News, Research, Stanford News, Videos

Stanford dermatologist tackles free drug samples on NewsHour

Stanford dermatologist tackles free drug samples on NewsHour

Last week, my colleague reported on a new Stanford study showing that free drug samples lead to more expensive prescriptions. Over the weekend, dermatologist Al Lane, MD, senior author of the study, appeared on PBS NewsHour to discuss the implications of his findings. (He’s also quoted in a New York Times blog post on the research.) After mentioning that pharmaceutical companies spend more than $6 billion a year on sampling, he told NewsHour’s Hari Sreenivasan “that [this] cost eventually has to be paid by someone.” And he closes on a powerful note:

One of the focuses of our study was for the dermatologists to realize that although they think they’re helping the patients, they’re really being manipulated to write for more expensive medications with no proven benefit of those medications over the generic drugs.

Previously: Drug samples lead to more expensive prescriptions, Stanford study finds

Health and Fitness, Technology, Videos

Wireless stick-on patch could make continuous health monitoring more flexible and practical

Wireless stick-on patch could make continuous health monitoring more flexible and practical

Stress tests or sleep studies are two examples of when long-term clinical monitoring are necessary. But bulky wires, sensors, or tape used during these studies can inhibit the natural movements of test subjects and potentially skew outcomes. In an effort to solve this issue, researchers at Northwestern University developed a wearable patch that adheres to the skin, easily stretches and moves with the body, gathers physiological statistics, and can send wireless updates to a cellphone or computer.

A recent post on Futurity offers more details about how the device, which stick to the skin like a temporary tattoo, was designed:

Researchers turned to soft microfluidic designs to address the challenge of integrating relatively big, bulky chips with the soft, elastic base of the patch. The patch is constructed of a thin elastic envelope filled with fluid. The chip components are suspended on tiny raised support points, bonding them to the underlying patch but allowing the patch to stretch and move.

One of the biggest engineering feats of the patch is the design of the tiny, squiggly wires connecting the electronics components—radios, power inductors, sensors, and more. The serpentine-shaped wires are folded like origami, so that no matter which way the patch bends, twists or stretches, the wires can unfold in any direction to accommodate the motion. Since the wires stretch, the chips don’t have to.

The article goes on to discuss the potential of wearable electronic devices in health care, including the possibility of detecting motions associated with Parkinson’s disease at its onset.

Previously: Ultra-thin flexible device offers non-invasive method of monitoring heart health, blood pressure, New method for developing flexible nanowire electronics could yield ultrasensitive biosensors and Stanford researchers develop a new biosensor chip that could speed drug development

Neuroscience, Research, Technology, Videos

Using Google Glass to improve quality of life for Parkinson’s patients

Using Google Glass to improve quality of life for Parkinson's patients

Researchers at Newcastle University are exploring ways that Google Glass could improve Parkinson’s patients’ quality of life by assisting them in placing phone calls, reminding them to take their medications or giving them behavioral prompts, such as speaking louder. In the video above, Roisin McNaney, a PhD student in the university’s Digital Interaction Group, explains how using Glass could ease patients’ anxiety about encountering a symptom-related problem while in public, raise patients’ confidence and, ultimately, make them more independent.

Previously: Abraham Verghese uses Google Glass to demonstrate how to begin a patient exam, Revealed: The likely role of Parkinson’s protein in the healthy brain and Stanford study identifies molecular mechanism that triggers Parkinson’s
Via Medgadget

Health and Fitness, Stanford News, Videos

How social connection can improve physical and mental health

How social connection can improve physical and mental health

Past research has shown that a lack of social connection may be a greater detriment to a person’s health than obesity, smoking and high blood pressure. In this TEDxHayward video, Emma Seppala, PhD, associate director of Stanford’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education, discusses these and other findings showing that maintaining strong social relationships can improve physical and mental health. Contrary to popular belief, she says, social connection has more to do with your subjective feeling of connection than how many friends you have.

Take a moment to watch the talk and learn how fostering compassion for others and yourself can increase social connection and, as a result, benefit your health.

Previously: How loneliness can impact the immune system, The scientific importance of social connections for your health and Elderly adults turn to social media to stay connected, stave off loneliness

Autism, Genetics, Neuroscience, Research, Videos

Building a blueprint of the developing human brain

Building a blueprint of the developing human brain

In an effort to identify and better understand how genes turned on or off before birth influence early brain development, scientists at the Allen Institute for Brain Science have created a comprehensive three-dimensional map that illustrates the activity of some 20,000 genes in 300 brain regions during mid-prenatal development.

A post on the NIH Director’s blog discusses the significance of the project, known as the BrainSpan Atlas of the Developing Human Brain:

While this is just the first installment of what will be an atlas of gene activity covering the entire course of human brain development, this rich trove of data is already transforming the way we think about neurodevelopmental disorders.

To test the powers of the new atlas, researchers decided to use the database to explore the activity of 319 genes, previously linked to autism, during the mid-prenatal period. They discovered that many of these genes were switched on in the developing neocortex—a part of the brain that is responsible for complex behaviors and that is known to be disrupted in children with autism. Specifically, these genes were activated in newly formed excitatory neurons, which are nerve cells that send information from one part of the brain to another. The finding provides more evidence that the first seeds for autism are planted at the time when the cortex is in the midst of forming its six-layered architecture and circuitry.

In the above video, Ed Lein, PhD, an Allen Institute investigator, talks about the atlas and explains how it will allow researchers to examine genes that have been associated with a range of neurodevelopmental disorders and pinpoint when and where that gene is being used.

Previously: NIH announces focus of funding for BRAIN initiative, Brain’s gain: Stanford neuroscientist discusses two major new initiatives and Co-leader of Obama’s BRAIN Initiative to direct Stanford’s interdisciplinary neuroscience institute

Medical Education, Stanford News, Videos

High schoolers share thoughts from Stanford’s Med School 101

High schoolers share thoughts from Stanford's Med School 101

Scenes from this year’s Med School 101: In the video above, three high-school students describe their interests in science and the sessions they attended at Stanford Medicine’s recent daylong event for local teens. One of the presenters, Anand Veeravagu, MD, also weighed in, saying: “I really wanted to share with them my journey from graduating high school all the way to being a neurosurgery resident and what that involves.” (A lot of training!)

For those interested in seeing more, images from the event can be found on our Flickr photo set.

Previously: The brain whisperer: Stanford neurologist talks about his work, shares tips with aspiring doctorsAt Med School 101, teens learn that it’s “so cool to be a doctor” and Med School 101 kicks off on Stanford campus today

Bioengineering, Global Health, Medicine and Society, Stanford News, Videos

Music box inspires a chemistry set for kids and scientists in developing countries

Music box inspires a chemistry set for kids and scientists in developing countries

Over the past few weeks my colleague Kris Newby has been writing about the Foldscope, the 50-cent microscope developed by bioengineer Manu Prakash, PhD. Today Prakash is announcing another device that will bring high tech science to the developing world – and to kids.

The device won a contest from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Society for Science & the Public to “Reimagine the chemistry set for the 21st century.” In the contest materials, the two groups cite the absence of chemistry sets on the market today that inspire creativity.

As the parent of two boys I have to agree. Chemistry toys these days come with prepackaged materials and set instructions for how to use them. Sure, I’m not enthusiastic about some of the dangerous chemicals in the kits that inspired an older generation of scientists, but a bit of creativity would be nice.

Prakash took inspiration from a simple music box to design a handheld chemistry set that can be programmed using holes punched in a paper tape. The prize came from the set’s use as a toy to inspire kids, but Prakash and graduate student George Korir also envision it being used to carry out science in developing countries. They say it can be built for about $5. Prakash told me, “I’d started thinking about this connection between science education and global health. The things that you make for kids to explore science [are] also exactly the kind of things that you need in the field because they need to be robust and they need to be highly versatile.”

My Stanford Report story goes on to describe how it works:

Like the music box, the prototype includes a hand cranked wheel and paper tape with periodic holes punched by the user. When a pin encounters a hole in the tape it flips and activates a pump that releases a single drop from a channel. In the simplest design, 15 independent pumps, valves and droplet generators can all be controlled simultaneously.

Prakash and Korir didn’t set out to make a kit for kids. Their idea was that a portable, programmable chemistry kit could be used around the world to test water quality, provide affordable medical diagnostic tests, assess soil chemistry for agriculture or as a snake bite venom test kit. It could even be used in modern labs to carry out experiments on a very small scale.

This chemistry set and the Foldscope are both part of what Prakash calls “frugal science.” There’s more about how the device works in the technical paper.

Previously: Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscope and Free DIY microscope kits to citizen scientists with inspiring project ideas
Photo in featured entry box by George Korir

Neuroscience, Patient Care, Stanford News, Videos

Treating intractible epilepsy

Treating intractible epilepsy

In this new Stanford Medicine video, patient Laura Koellstad tells the story of how her life changed with her first seizure and a diagnosis of intractible epilepsy, and then turned around following treatment at Stanford. Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences, and Robert Fisher, MD, PhD, director of the Stanford Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, explain the functional mapping and surgical procedures used to treat Koellstad’s condition, allowing her to return to work and regain her ability to drive.

Previously: The brain whisperer: Stanford neurologist talks about his work, shares tips with aspiring doctorsHow epilepsy patients are teaching Stanford scientists more about the brain and Implanting electrodes to treat epilepsy, better understand the brain

Nutrition, Stanford News, Videos

Improving your health using herbs and spices

Can certain herbs and spices really boost immunity, control blood sugar, lower blood pressure and ease joint pain? As registered dietician Alison Ryan discusses in this Stanford Hospital & Clinics video, a growing body of scientific evidence suggests the answer is yes. During the 90-minute presentation, she explains in detail how ginger, turmeric, cinnamon and other ingredients can add a healthful punch to any meal, snack, or beverage by working to curb inflammation and prevent or delay certain types of cell damage. The talk is part of the Healthy Strides Ernest Rosenbaum Cancer Survivorship Lecture Series presented by the Cancer Supportive Care Program at Stanford.

Previously: How food may influence our cells and overall health and Nature/nurture study of type 2 diabetes risk unearths carrots as potential risk reducers

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