Published by
Stanford Medicine

Category

Videos

Big data, Genetics, Stanford News, Technology, Videos

Ann Wojcicki discusses personalized medicine: “In the next 10 years everyone will have their genome”

Ann Wojcicki discusses personalized medicine: "In the next 10 years everyone will have their genome"

The 2014 Big Data in Biomedicine conference was held here last month, and keynote speakers, panelists, moderators and attendees are now available on the Stanford Medicine YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to benefit human health, we’ll be featuring a selection of the videos this month on Scope.

Ann Wojcicki, CEO and co-founder of personal-genetics company 23andMe, delivered a keynote speech at Big Data in Biomedicine in 2013 about empowering patients and the importance of owning one’s genetic data. Returning this year to the conference as an attendee, Wojcicki spoke in a Behind the Scenes at Big Data interview about, among other things, her early interest in genes, her belief that genetics are an important part of preventative care, and her desire for a framework where patient communities can easily participate, and potentially direct, medical research. She also discussed the status of 23andMe in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorization process and sounded a hopeful note about patients’ future access to their genetic information. “I believe that in the next 10 years everyone will have their genome,” she said.

Previously: When it comes to your genetic data, 23andMe’s Anne Wojcicki says: Just own it

Stanford News, Videos

Say Cheese: A photo shoot with Stanford Medicine’s seven Nobel laureates

What happens when you gather together seven Nobel laureates for a photo shoot? This may sound like the start of a good joke, but it’s actually just an introduction to the video above, shot at the medical school earlier this spring. In it, we get a quick, behind-the-scenes look at the school’s past winners – including our most recent Nobelists, Thomas Südhof, MD, and Michael Levitt, PhD – as they chat and wait patiently for their photo to be taken. (The resulting photograph appears on Stanford Medicine’s new website.)

Previously: Stanford winners Michael Levitt and Thomas Südhof celebrate Nobel Week, Stanford’s Michael Levitt wins 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Stanford’s Thomas Südhof wins 2013 Nobel Prize in Medicine and Stanford’s Brian Kobilka wins 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Big data, Genetics, Research, Stanford News, Videos

Stanford statistician Chiara Sabatti on teaching students to “ride the big data wave”

Stanford statistician Chiara Sabatti on teaching students to "ride the big data wave"

The 2014 Big Data in Biomedicine conference was held here last month, and keynote speakers, panelists, moderators and attendees are now available on the Stanford Medicine YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to benefit human health, we’ll be featuring a selection of the videos this month on Scope.

During the Big Data in Biomedicine conference, Chiara Sabatti, PhD, an associate professor of health research and policy at Stanford, moderated a panel on statistics and machine learning. In the above video, Sabatti highlights a Stanford undergrad course titled “Riding the Big Data Wave” (she calls it a gentle introduction to statistics) and discusses how students in the class are exploring data sets available on the Internet and what can be learned from them. She also references her work building statistical methods that enable researchers to understand the content in these data sets, and her research examining how the genome influences human phenotypes, or observational characteristics such as height, weight and cholesterol levels.

Previously: Rising to the challenge of harnessing big data to benefit patients, Discussing access and transparency of big data in government and U.S. Chief Technology Officer kicks off Big Data in Biomedicine

Autism, Big data, Stanford News, Technology, Videos

Using Google Glass to help individuals with autism better understand social cues

Using Google Glass to help individuals with autism better understand social cues

The 2014 Big Data in Biomedicine conference was held here last month, and keynote speakers, panelists, moderators and attendees are now available on the Stanford Medicine YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to benefit human health, we’ll be featuring a selection of the videos this month on Scope.

At the Big Data in Biomedicine 2014 conference, Dennis Wall, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics in systems medicine at Stanford, discussed how he and colleagues are leveraging home videos and a seven-point parent questionnaire to diagnose autism. In a pair of Behind the Scenes at Big Data videos, Wall discusses the research and its potential to speed up the standard diagnosis process, as well as another project aimed at using Google Glass to help autistic individuals better read others’ emotions. Watch the above clip to learn how the wearable technology could be used for a new type of behavioral therapy.

Previously: Rising to the challenge of harnessing big data to benefit patients and Home videos could help diagnose autism, says new Stanford study

Stanford News, Stem Cells, Surgery, Videos

Stanford reconstructive surgeon Jill Helms reminds us that “beauty isn’t defined by our faces alone”

Stanford reconstructive surgeon Jill Helms reminds us that "beauty isn't defined by our faces alone"

Jill Helms, PhD, a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at Stanford, leads a team of scientists that are working on methods to activate a patient’s own stem cells at the site of an injury to speed up tissue healing. In this TEDxStanford video, Helms discusses how surgical scars can sometimes impede growth of a patient’s body, such as the repair of a child’s cleft palate, and the potential of using stem cells to enhance the body’s natural healing process.

As previously mentioned here, Helms delivered a talk on the topic of beauty reconsidered, and she reminds us at the end of the video that “beauty isn’t defined by our faces alone.” She says, “Beauty is compassion, kindness and warmth, and that’s internal beauty. That’s the most important beauty.”

Previously: A spotlight on TEDxStanford’s “awe-inspiring” and “deeply moving” talks and Stanford study shows protein bath may rev up sluggish bone-forming cells

Cancer, Patient Care, Stanford News, Videos

When a rash isn’t just a rash: A patient’s battle with mycosis fungoides

Paul Raffer, MD, is a doctor, accustomed to avoiding the kind of leap that non-physicians often make by assuming common symptoms are something far more serious. So he saw the rash that appeared on his body a few years ago as nothing to worry about. The irony, of course, is that the rash turned out to be something quite serious: mycosis fungoides, a form of blood cancer that shows itself in the skin. It’s a common form of cutaneous lymphoma but it is considered rare, appearing at a rate of 3.6 cases per million people each year.

Raffer’s belief that the rash was benign changed, as he told me for this story, when that rash spread over his entire body and began to itch continuously. “I stopped being able to sleep. My skin started flaking and peeling. I also started getting very thick plaques, with lesions all over my back, my abdomen and my arms. But the worst part was the itchiness. And there was nothing that worked very well to control it.”

Because mycosis fungoides is rare, specialists are not plentiful. But what encouraged Raffer, who lives in Arizona, was when his doctor instructed him: “Go to Stanford. See Dr. Youn Kim. If not one of the world’s experts, she is certainly the West Coast guru for what you have.”

Once Raffer was evaluated at the Stanford Multidisciplinary Cutaneous Lymphoma Clinic, he received another blow: His condition was at Stage IV. (Mycocis fungoides can progress quite slowly, but Raffer’s had advanced to an aggressive form called Sézary syndrome.) “Your insides fall out when you hear Stage IV of anything,” Raffer said. But, three years later, Raffer is healthy again.

Applied Biotechnology, Events, Infectious Disease, Research, Stanford News, Videos

Stanford microbiologist’s secret sauce for disease detection

Stanford microbiologist's secret sauce for disease detection

Last week, John Boothroyd, PhD, kicked off Stanford’s first Disease Detective lecture series with a fascinating tale about how his lab invented a simple biochemical “secret sauce” that revolutionized the detection of viral and bacterial infections like HIV, Hepatitis C and gonorrhea.

“It mostly started as a sketch on a piece of paper, then later became Gen-Probe’s core technology, which won them the 2004 National Medal of Technology,” explained Boothroyd, a Stanford professor of microbiology and immunology.

What Boothroyd invented, in collaboration with postdoctoral researchers James Burg and Philippe Pouletty, is called Transcription-Mediated Amplification.

Before this discovery, detecting a snippet of disease-specific DNA in a sample of cells was like finding a needle in a haystack. To increase a test’s accuracy, a lab technician would try to coax the target DNA into replicating itself through hours of tedious time-and- temperature-sensitive steps.

Boothroyd and his team’s new process consisted of a simple recipe of primers and enzymes that, after optimization by Gen-Probe, tricked a target snippet of DNA into automatically creating 10 billion copies of itself in less than an hour. This ultimately enabled the development of cheaper and faster disease tests.

In 2012 Boothroyd was ushered into the Stanford Inventor’s Hall of Fame because of this patent, which is among the top-ten revenue-generating inventions Stanford. He has six other patented inventions, including one that makes antigen production for the testing of toxoplasmosis infections far more efficient. Another detects toxoplasmosis in the amniotic fluid of pregnant women. He describes this research in the video above.

Looking back on his career choices, one thing that Boothroyd is grateful for is being able to combine his two loves at Stanford — basic research and teaching — while leaving the business of running a company to his patent licensees.

To the lecture hall filled with student researchers worried about the “postdocalypse,” the shortage of tenure-track research positions in academia, he gave this advice:

“I think the [postdocalypse] negativity is overstated. You have to have faith in yourself. You have to do what you want to do. If you’re enjoying your work and it’s a stepping stone to where you’re going, relax and see what happens.”

The next Disease Detective lecture will be held during fall quarter 2014. Watch for details on the Stanford Predictives and Diagnostics Accelerator webpage.

Previously: Patrick House discusses Toxoplasma gondii, parasitic mind control and zombies, Cat guts, car crashes, and warp-speed Toxoplasma infections, and NIH study supports screening pregnant women for toxoplasmosis

Big data, Stanford News, Videos

Professor Margot Gerritsen discusses how “algebra is not just useful, it’s also inherently beautiful”

Professor Margot Gerritsen discusses how "algebra is not just useful, it's also inherently beautiful"

In the above video from the recent TEDxStanford event, Margot Gerritsen, PhD, associate professor of energy resources and engineering and director of the Institute for Computational & Mathematical Engineering, shares how algebra is core to science, medicine and engineering and can be used to solve complex problems in the world. In discussing the institute’s ongoing projects, which include research related to cancer and computational surgery, she explains why algebra is beautiful.

Gerritsen is among those presenting at the upcoming Big Data in Biomedicine conference, which will be held May 21-23 on Stanford campus. She will be will be speaking on the computers and architecture panel. Registration for the conference is closed, but the program will be broadcast live on the Big Data in Biomedicine website.

Previously: NIH Director: “Big Data should inspire us”, Chief technology officer of the United States to speak at Big Data in Biomedicine conference, Big Data in Biomedicine technical showcase to feature companies’ innovations related to big data and Euan Ashley discusses harnessing big data to drive innovation for a healthier world

Chronic Disease, Health Policy, Nutrition, Obesity, Pediatrics, Videos

Fed Up: A documentary looks for answers about childhood obesity

Fed Up: A documentary looks for answers about childhood obesity

I can’t wait to see Fed Up, a new documentary about childhood obesity.

In the early 2000s, when I was earning a PhD in nutrition at UC Davis, I heard a lot of scientific debate about possible causes of the U.S. obesity epidemic. Was it too much fat in our diets? Too much sugar? Processed food? Junk food ads on TV? An “obesogenic environment” – one in which snacks are ubiquitous, adults drive everywhere and neighborhoods aren’t safe enough for kids to play outside?

Or was it something else?

“The message has been pushed on us: It’s your fault you’re fat,” says Mark Hyman, MD, chair of the Institute for Functional Medicine, in the Fed Up trailer above.

The movie assembles an impressive roster of experts in nutrition research, pediatric health and public advocacy to oppose that message. Michael Pollan, Mark Bittman, Robert Lustig, Marion Nestle, Harvey Karp, former President Bill Clinton and others say we should not be blaming individuals – especially kids – for struggles with their weight. Instead, they are taking a hard look for answers at the food environment.

“This is the first generation of American children expected to lead shorter lives than their parents,” says a voice-over in the Fed Up trailer. That definitely makes untangling the causes of the obesity epidemic worthy of the efforts of our best scientists. Like I said, I can’t wait to see it.

Previously: Childhood obesity a risk for imminent heart problems, research shows, Using hip hop to teach children about healthy habits and Sugar intake, diabetes and kids: Q&A with a pediatric obesity expert
Via Food Politics

Emergency Medicine, Stanford News, Videos

Stanford Life Flight celebrates 30 years

Stanford Life Flight celebrates 30 years

In May 1984, Stanford Life Flight’s first helicopter transport lifted a 70-year-old woman, critically injured in a car accident, over the Santa Cruz Mountains to Stanford Hospital. With that flight, Stanford became the first medical center in the Bay Area to have its own helicopter and air medical transport team. In its 30 year history, the air ambulance medical service has transported more than 15,000 patients going as far as 250 miles to California’s Northern and Central coasts, Central Valley and to Reno, Nev.

Priding themselves on their flight nurses’ extensive training and experience in caring for critically ill or injured patients, and on their accident-free flight track record, the men and women of Life Flight are an example of how combining compassionate care with advanced care capabilities saves lives. We celebrate their work in the hospital video above.

Previously: Teen benefited by Stanford surgeon’s passion for trauma care

Stanford Medicine Resources: