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Cancer, NIH, Public Health, Research, Stanford News, Videos

NIH associate director for data science on the importance of “data to the biomedicine enterprise”

NIH associate director for data science on the importance of "data to the biomedicine enterprise"

The 2014 Big Data in Biomedicine conference was held here last month, and interviews with keynote speakers, panelists, moderators and attendees are now available on the Stanford Medicine YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to benefit human health, we’ll be featuring a selection of the videos this month on Scope.

During his keynote speech at Big Data in Biomedicine 2014, Philip Bourne, PhD, the first permanent associate director for data science at the National Institutes of Health, shared how the federal agency hopes to capitalize on big data to accelerate biomedicine discovery, address scientific questions with potential societal benefit and promote open science.

In the above video, he talks about how data “is becoming increasingly important to the biomedical enterprise” and the NIH’s effort to coordinate strategies related to computation and informatics in biomedicine across its 27 institutes and centers, which effectively form the basis of improvements in health care across every major medical condition. “Our goal is to create interoperability between these entities,” he says in the interview. “We see data as the catalyst to create this cross talk across these respective institutes.”

Previously: Rising to the challenge of harnessing big data to benefit patients, Discussing access and transparency of big data in government and U.S. Chief Technology Officer kicks off Big Data in Biomedicine

Big data, Global Health, Infectious Disease, Videos

Discussing the importance of harnessing big data for global-health solutions

Discussing the importance of harnessing big data for global-health solutions

The 2014 Big Data in Biomedicine conference was held here last month, and interviews with keynote speakers, panelists, moderators and attendees are now available on the Stanford Medicine YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to benefit human health, we’ll be featuring a selection of the videos this month on Scope.

At this year’s Big Data in Biomedicine conference, Michele Barry, MD, FACP, senior associate dean and director of the Center for Innovation in Global Health at Stanford, moderated a panel on infectious diseases. During the discussion, she raised the point that the lines between infectious disease and non-communicable disease are becoming increasingly blurred.

In the above video, Barry expands on this point and offers her point of view on the role big data can play in advancing global health solutions. “Big Data is clearly important these days to get a larger picture of population health,” say says. “What I’m concerned about, and would love to see happen, is for big data surveillance to happen in developing countries and under-served areas, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa.” Watch Barry’s interview to understand how harnessing big data to improve preventative care for large populations could benefit all of us.

Previously: Stanford statistician Chiara Sabatti on teaching students to “ride the big data wave”, Using Google Glass to help individuals with autism better understand social cues, Rising to the challenge of harnessing big data to benefit patients and U.S. Chief Technology Officer kicks off Big Data in Biomedicine

Aging, Neuroscience, Sleep, Videos

Examining how sleep quality and duration affect cognitive function as we age

Examining how sleep quality and duration affect cognitive function as we age

We all feel better, and can think more clearly, after a good night’s rest. But new research underscores the importance of sleep quality and duration during middle age to stave off cognitive decline.

The study (subscription required) examines data compiled as part of the long-term Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE), which is funded by a joint agreement of the National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization. The project began in 2007 and involves more than 30,000 individuals aged 50 and older across China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation and South Africa.

Among the key findings is that middle-aged or older people who get six to nine hours of sleep a night think better than those sleeping fewer or more hours, and that excessive sleep is equally damaging as too little sleep. In the above video, researchers discuss how despite cultural, environmental and economical differences, study results showed strong patterns relating to gender, sleep quality and cognitive function.

Via PsychCentral
Previously: What are the consequences of sleep deprivation? and Experts discuss possible link between sleep disorder and dementia

Big data, Public Health, Research, Stanford News, Videos

Videos of Big Data in Biomedicine keynotes and panel discussions now available online

Videos of Big Data in Biomedicine keynotes and panel discussions now available online

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Computational processing power and interconnectedness are causing massive, ongoing advances in biomedical research and health care. But, as discussed at the Big Data in Biomedicine conference, large-scale data analysis also holds the potential to be even more disruptive and transform how we diagnose, treat and prevent disease.

Those who weren’t able to attend the event or watch the webcast, as well as others who may want to review the presentations a second time, can now watch videos of a selection of the keynote speeches and panel discussions on the conference website.

Among the videos available is a talk by David Glazer, director of engineering at Google, about how the company is working to foster collaboration among biomedical researchers that need to analyze vast amounts of data and those with the technological tools to do so. In another talk, Taha Kass-Hout, MD, chief health informatics officer at the Food and Drug Administration, outlined the importance of big data to the federal agency’s mission “to protect and promote the public health” and in promoting information-sharing with transparency and protection of privacy. The video above – the final keynote from Vinod Khosla, MBA, founder of Khosla Ventures and a co-founder of Sun Microsystems – is a must watch. The legendary venture capitalist sparked debate when he shared his perspective that “technology will replace 80 to 90 percent of doctors’ role in the decision-making process.”

Previously: Stanford statistician Chiara Sabatti on teaching students to “ride the big data wave”, Using Google Glass to help individuals with autism better understand social cues, Rising to the challenge of harnessing big data to benefit patients and Discussing access and transparency of big data in government.

Big data, Genetics, Stanford News, Technology, Videos

Ann Wojcicki discusses personalized medicine: “In the next 10 years everyone will have their genome”

Ann Wojcicki discusses personalized medicine: "In the next 10 years everyone will have their genome"

The 2014 Big Data in Biomedicine conference was held here last month, and keynote speakers, panelists, moderators and attendees are now available on the Stanford Medicine YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to benefit human health, we’ll be featuring a selection of the videos this month on Scope.

Ann Wojcicki, CEO and co-founder of personal-genetics company 23andMe, delivered a keynote speech at Big Data in Biomedicine in 2013 about empowering patients and the importance of owning one’s genetic data. Returning this year to the conference as an attendee, Wojcicki spoke in a Behind the Scenes at Big Data interview about, among other things, her early interest in genes, her belief that genetics are an important part of preventative care, and her desire for a framework where patient communities can easily participate, and potentially direct, medical research. She also discussed the status of 23andMe in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorization process and sounded a hopeful note about patients’ future access to their genetic information. “I believe that in the next 10 years everyone will have their genome,” she said.

Previously: When it comes to your genetic data, 23andMe’s Anne Wojcicki says: Just own it

Stanford News, Videos

Say Cheese: A photo shoot with Stanford Medicine’s seven Nobel laureates

What happens when you gather together seven Nobel laureates for a photo shoot? This may sound like the start of a good joke, but it’s actually just an introduction to the video above, shot at the medical school earlier this spring. In it, we get a quick, behind-the-scenes look at the school’s past winners – including our most recent Nobelists, Thomas Südhof, MD, and Michael Levitt, PhD – as they chat and wait patiently for their photo to be taken. (The resulting photograph appears on Stanford Medicine’s new website.)

Previously: Stanford winners Michael Levitt and Thomas Südhof celebrate Nobel Week, Stanford’s Michael Levitt wins 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Stanford’s Thomas Südhof wins 2013 Nobel Prize in Medicine and Stanford’s Brian Kobilka wins 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Big data, Genetics, Research, Stanford News, Videos

Stanford statistician Chiara Sabatti on teaching students to “ride the big data wave”

Stanford statistician Chiara Sabatti on teaching students to "ride the big data wave"

The 2014 Big Data in Biomedicine conference was held here last month, and keynote speakers, panelists, moderators and attendees are now available on the Stanford Medicine YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to benefit human health, we’ll be featuring a selection of the videos this month on Scope.

During the Big Data in Biomedicine conference, Chiara Sabatti, PhD, an associate professor of health research and policy at Stanford, moderated a panel on statistics and machine learning. In the above video, Sabatti highlights a Stanford undergrad course titled “Riding the Big Data Wave” (she calls it a gentle introduction to statistics) and discusses how students in the class are exploring data sets available on the Internet and what can be learned from them. She also references her work building statistical methods that enable researchers to understand the content in these data sets, and her research examining how the genome influences human phenotypes, or observational characteristics such as height, weight and cholesterol levels.

Previously: Rising to the challenge of harnessing big data to benefit patients, Discussing access and transparency of big data in government and U.S. Chief Technology Officer kicks off Big Data in Biomedicine

Autism, Big data, Stanford News, Technology, Videos

Using Google Glass to help individuals with autism better understand social cues

Using Google Glass to help individuals with autism better understand social cues

The 2014 Big Data in Biomedicine conference was held here last month, and keynote speakers, panelists, moderators and attendees are now available on the Stanford Medicine YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to benefit human health, we’ll be featuring a selection of the videos this month on Scope.

At the Big Data in Biomedicine 2014 conference, Dennis Wall, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics in systems medicine at Stanford, discussed how he and colleagues are leveraging home videos and a seven-point parent questionnaire to diagnose autism. In a pair of Behind the Scenes at Big Data videos, Wall discusses the research and its potential to speed up the standard diagnosis process, as well as another project aimed at using Google Glass to help autistic individuals better read others’ emotions. Watch the above clip to learn how the wearable technology could be used for a new type of behavioral therapy.

Previously: Rising to the challenge of harnessing big data to benefit patients and Home videos could help diagnose autism, says new Stanford study

Stanford News, Stem Cells, Surgery, Videos

Stanford reconstructive surgeon Jill Helms reminds us that “beauty isn’t defined by our faces alone”

Stanford reconstructive surgeon Jill Helms reminds us that "beauty isn't defined by our faces alone"

Jill Helms, PhD, a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at Stanford, leads a team of scientists that are working on methods to activate a patient’s own stem cells at the site of an injury to speed up tissue healing. In this TEDxStanford video, Helms discusses how surgical scars can sometimes impede growth of a patient’s body, such as the repair of a child’s cleft palate, and the potential of using stem cells to enhance the body’s natural healing process.

As previously mentioned here, Helms delivered a talk on the topic of beauty reconsidered, and she reminds us at the end of the video that “beauty isn’t defined by our faces alone.” She says, “Beauty is compassion, kindness and warmth, and that’s internal beauty. That’s the most important beauty.”

Previously: A spotlight on TEDxStanford’s “awe-inspiring” and “deeply moving” talks and Stanford study shows protein bath may rev up sluggish bone-forming cells

Cancer, Patient Care, Stanford News, Videos

When a rash isn’t just a rash: A patient’s battle with mycosis fungoides

Paul Raffer, MD, is a doctor, accustomed to avoiding the kind of leap that non-physicians often make by assuming common symptoms are something far more serious. So he saw the rash that appeared on his body a few years ago as nothing to worry about. The irony, of course, is that the rash turned out to be something quite serious: mycosis fungoides, a form of blood cancer that shows itself in the skin. It’s a common form of cutaneous lymphoma but it is considered rare, appearing at a rate of 3.6 cases per million people each year.

Raffer’s belief that the rash was benign changed, as he told me for this story, when that rash spread over his entire body and began to itch continuously. “I stopped being able to sleep. My skin started flaking and peeling. I also started getting very thick plaques, with lesions all over my back, my abdomen and my arms. But the worst part was the itchiness. And there was nothing that worked very well to control it.”

Because mycosis fungoides is rare, specialists are not plentiful. But what encouraged Raffer, who lives in Arizona, was when his doctor instructed him: “Go to Stanford. See Dr. Youn Kim. If not one of the world’s experts, she is certainly the West Coast guru for what you have.”

Once Raffer was evaluated at the Stanford Multidisciplinary Cutaneous Lymphoma Clinic, he received another blow: His condition was at Stage IV. (Mycocis fungoides can progress quite slowly, but Raffer’s had advanced to an aggressive form called Sézary syndrome.) “Your insides fall out when you hear Stage IV of anything,” Raffer said. But, three years later, Raffer is healthy again.

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