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Patient Care, Pregnancy, Stanford News, Women's Health

New obstetric hemorrhage tool kit released today

New obstetric hemorrhage tool kit released today

pregnantbelly-3A few years ago, when my niece was born, my sister had a severe postpartum hemorrhage. I remember getting off the phone with my mom, who had just delivered the simultaneous news of the baby’s birth and my sister’s serious condition, and feeling terrified. My sister was being taken into surgery to try to stop the bleeding. What if she died? In the U.S., deaths from postpartum hemorrhage are rare, but they do happen.

The first thing that gave me a sense of reassurance, strangely, was a search of the medical database PubMed. After I got off the phone, I sat at my laptop looking at a multicolored flow chart that summarized how to stop an obstetric hemorrhage. All of the steps taken by my sister’s medical team were listed. Although she was hundreds of miles away, I felt comforted by the knowledge that her doctors were following well-established, evidence-based guidelines for what to do.

It wasn’t until a few minutes later that I realized the flow chart was developed by doctors I know. It was part of the Obstetric Hemorrhage Toolkit, a set of guidelines published by the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative (CMQCC). I had first heard of the toolkit from a Stanford obstetric anesthesiologist who helped put it together, but had never imagined it might save someone in my family.

The toolkit was developed because maternal hemorrhages are rare, risky, and extremely time-sensitive. The kit gives medical teams the information they need to rehearse for, recognize and treat these hemorrhages immediately, without wasting minutes that could save the patient’s life.

Today, the CMQCC is releasing a new version of the toolkit. The update strengthens several areas of the kit, providing clearer parameters for use of certain medications and blood products and more information about how to support patients and families after a maternal hemorrhage, for instance.

And the flow chart I found calming is still there, on page 21 of this .pdf file. I’m so happy to see it again because, for me, it symbolizes the doctors, patients and families who will benefit from the kit in the future.

As for my family’s story, my mom called back later on the evening of my niece’s birth to tell me that the bleeding had stopped and my sister was recovering. Her introduction to motherhood was rougher than most, but today my sister and her daughter are fine: My favorite moment of a recent family gathering was seeing my chubby-cheeked niece racing toward me yelling “Aunnnnntie Errrrin!” with my beloved sister in hot pursuit behind her.

Previously: In poorest countries, increase in midwives could save mothers and their babies, Cardiac arrest in pregnancy: New consensus statement addresses CPR for expectant moms and Program focuses on treatment of placental disorders
Photo by bies

Cancer, Genetics, In the News, Women's Health

Angelina Jolie Pitt’s New York Times essay praised by Stanford cancer expert

Angelina Jolie Pitt's New York Times essay praised by Stanford cancer expert

4294641229_c78b406658_zYou’ve likely heard today about Angelina Jolie Pitt’s New York Times essay regarding her decision to have her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed. Women who carry mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have a significantly increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer; Jolie carries such a mutation, and in 2013 she shared publicly her decision to have her breasts removed to reduce her risk of cancer.

Jolie Pitt shares her decision-making process and notes that though she won’t be able to have any more children and though she still remains prone to cancer, she feels “at ease with whatever will come.” She closes her latest essay by writing, “It is not easy to make these decisions. But it is possible to take control and tackle head-on any health issue. You can seek advice, learn about the options and make choices that are right for you.”

After reading the piece I reached out to Stanford cancer geneticist Allison Kurian, MD, who told me:

Angelina Jolie made a very courageous decision to share her experience publicly.  The surgery she chose is strongly recommended for all women with BRCA1/2 mutations by age 40, since it’s the only way to prevent an ovarian cancer in these high-risk women, and early detection doesn’t work. This is a life-saving intervention for high-risk women.

Kurian is associate director of the Stanford Program in Clinical Cancer Genetics and a member of the Stanford Cancer Institute. In 2012 she published on online tool to help women with BRCA mutations understand their treatment options.

Previously: Helping inform tough cancer-related decisions, NIH Director highlights Stanford research on breast cancer surgery choices and Breast cancer patients are getting more bilateral mastectomies – but not any survival benefit
Photo by Marco Musso

Imaging, In the News, NIH, Pregnancy, Research, Women's Health

NIH puts focus on the placenta, the “fascinating” and “least understood” organ

NIH puts focus on the placenta, the "fascinating" and "least understood" organ

ultrasoundLast week, the NIH announced its support for an initiative to study how new technologies can shed light on the placenta’s function and health during pregnancy. Considering how crucial the placenta is to not only the health of a woman and her fetus during pregnancy, but also to the lifelong health of both, it’s surprising to hear the NIH call it “the least understood human organ.”

Currently, doctors and scientists can only gather information about the placenta by using ultrasounds and blood tests, and by examining it after delivery. What if new sensors could track how well blood, oxygen, and nutrients are flowing to the fetus, or if new imaging technologies could assess how well the placenta is attaching to the uterine wall? What if biotechnology could assess the effects of environmental factors on the placenta, such as air pollution, maternal diet, and medications?

Better understanding and monitoring of this temporary organ promises to improve maternal and child health. Placental issues can contribute to negative pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, preterm birth, and stillbirth, and they’ve also been linked to a higher risk of heart disease later in life, for both mother and child.

This is the third and largest funding announcement for the NIH’s Human Placenta Project, led by the NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and cosponsored by the NIH’s National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

Calling the placenta a “fascinating organ” and the “lifeline that gives us our start in the world” Alan E. Guttmacher, MD, director of the NICHHD, also said in an NIH press release:

We hope this funding opportunity will attract a broad range of researchers and clinicians to help — placental biologists, obstetricians, and experts in imaging, bioengineering, and other arenas… For researchers who want to apply their skills in an area of medicine that isn’t being looked at as much as both scientific opportunity and human health warrant, this is a wonderful chance.

Previously: Placenta, the video game, The placenta sacrifices itself to keep baby healthy in case of starvation and Program focuses on the treatment of placental disorders
Related: Too deeply attached and A most mysterious organ
Photo by thinkpanama

Mental Health, Parenting, Pregnancy, Women's Health

A telephone lifeline for moms with postpartum depression

A telephone lifeline for moms with postpartum depression

Van_Gogh_-_Madame_Augustine_Roulin_mit_BabyI’m currently pregnant and due in less than two weeks. It’s my second child, so I’m not as worried about caring for a newborn as I was the first time around. But one nagging worry I have is the risk of postpartum depression, sometimes called postnatal depression. I have a family history of depression and that puts me at higher risk. Luckily, it wasn’t a problem with my firstborn, but it can crop up in later pregnancies – and scientists don’t entirely understand the reasons for it.

Postpartum depression usually hits four to six weeks after delivery—though it can show up months later. It’s characterized by feeling overwhelmed, trapped, guilty or inadequate, along with crying, irritability, problems concentrating, loss of appetite or libido, or sleep problems. An estimated 9 to 16 percent of new mothers are affected by postpartum depression. Even men are known to suffer from it sometimes. PPD affects not just the mother (or father), but can have lasting effects on the child as well, so helping these parents through a difficult and isolating time is critical

Now, a study published in Journal of Advanced Nursing shows that providing a social network for new moms, via phone calls from other mothers who had recovered from PPD, could alleviate symptoms for moms in the study for up to two years after delivery. A news release summarized the findings:

For the present quasi-experimental study, researchers recruited 64 mothers with depression up to two years after delivery who were living in New Brunswick. Peer volunteers who recovered from postnatal depression were trained as peer support and provided an average of nine support calls. The average age of mothers was 26 years, with 77% reporting depressive symptoms prior to pregnancy and 57% having pregnancy complications. There were 16 women (35%) who were taking medication for depression since the birth.

I find the idea that this insidious problem could be tackled with a phone version of the ubiquitous and valuable moms’ groups an uplifting one. Compared to drug treatments, regular phone calls from a peer who’s gone through something similar is a relatively cheap treatment. Further studies are needed, but I’ll be watching to see whether this approach takes hold as a standard intervention for PPD.

Previously: “2020 Mom Project” promotes awareness of perinatal mood disorders,  Is postpartum depression more of an urban problem?, Helping moms emerge from the darkness of postpartum depression, Breastfeeding difficulties may lead to depression in new moms, and Dads get postpartum depression, too
Image by Van Gogh

Mental Health, NIH, Pregnancy, Research, Women's Health

Women who have a stillbirth are more likely to experience long-term depression, study shows

Women who have a stillbirth are more likely to experience long-term depression, study shows

5614885964_e75f4261b2_zAny serious loss requires grieving time, and the birth of stillborn child is no exception. However, a recent study suggests that women who have experienced a stillbirth should be monitored for depressive symptoms well after the standard six-month grieving period – up to three years, in fact. Among women who have given birth and who have no history of depression, women who have had a stillbirth are at significantly higher risk of developing long-term depression.

The research was conducted by the NIH’s Stillbirth Collaborate Research Network (SCRN), which defines stillbirth as the death of a baby at or after the 20th week of pregnancy. It occurs in 1 out of 160 pregnancies in the United States, a surprisingly high ratio.

This study is the first to show definitively that women who have no history of depression may face a risk for it many months after a stillbirth

From 2006-2008, the researchers enrolled nearly 800 women from 59 hospitals across the U.S., around a third of whom had delivered a stillbirth (with the other two-thirds having had delivered a healthy baby). In 2009, the women were asked to complete a questionnaire designed to gauge whether they were experiencing symptoms of depression.

After accounting for other factors related to depression and stillbirth among the more than 76 percent of women who did not have a history of depression, the researchers found that women who had a stillbirth were twice as likely to have a high depression score compared to women who had a live birth. This difference was even greater among those responding to the questionnaire 2-3 years after they had delivered, at nearly nine times as likely.

In an NIH article, author Carol Hogue, PhD, director of the Women’s and Children’s Center at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta and first author of the study, said, “Earlier studies have found that women with a history of depression are especially vulnerable to persistent depression after a stillbirth, even after the subsequent birth of a healthy child,” but this study is the first to show definitively that women who have no history of depression may face a risk for depression many months after a stillbirth.

The study appears in the March issue of the journal Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology.

Previously: 2020 Mom Project promotes awareness of perinatal mood disordersLosing Jules: Breaking the silence around stillbirth, A call to break the silence of stillbirth and Pregnancy loss puts parents’ relationship at risk
Photo by Gates Foundation

Cardiovascular Medicine, In the News, Public Health, Research, Women's Health

A look at why young women who have heart attacks delay seeking care

A look at why young women who have heart attacks delay seeking care

317916781_c8bb9b352e_zHeart attacks kill more than 15,000 women in the U.S. each year and are disproportionately deadly for females under the age of 55. Although several studies, including those by Stanford cardiologist Jennifer Tremmel, MD, have investigated the signs and consequences of heart attacks in men and women, relatively little is known about heart disease in women or why it’s so lethal for young females. And according to new research, misconceptions about the risk factors and signs of coronary heart disease may be why young females are less likely to recognize and seek emergency care for a heart attack.

In the study, published yesterday in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, a research team led by Judith Lichtman, PhD, MPH, of the Yale School of Public Health, interviewed 30 women between the ages of 30 to 55  who had been hospitalized for a heart attack. The researchers identified five common themes among the symptoms and treatments of the women they interviewed, and one potentially important finding was that women were unsure they’d had a heart attack so they were hesitant to seek medical treatment.

From an NPR story:

A heart attack doesn’t necessarily feel like a sudden painful episode that ends in collapse, [Lichtman] notes. And women are more likely than men to experience vague symptoms like nausea or pain down their arms.

“Women may experience a combination of things they don’t always associate with a heart attack,” Lichtman says. “Maybe we need to do a better job of explaining and describing to the public what a heart attack looks and feels like.”

Tremmel also provided comment on the study, saying it indicates a need to encourage women to seek help for medical concerns. “This is an ongoing issue in the medical field,” she said. “…We all have to empower women patients, so they know that they need to not be so worried about going to the hospital if they’re afraid there’s something wrong.”

Previously: New test could lead to increase of women diagnosed with heart attack, Heart attacks and chest pain: Understanding the signs in young womenAsk Stanford Med: Cardiologist Jennifer Tremmel responds to questions on women’s heart healthPaper highlights major differences in disease between men and women and Gap exists in women’s knowledge of heart disease
Photo by Simon Mason

Aging, Chronic Disease, In the News, Media, Neuroscience, Women's Health

Science Friday explores women’s heightened risk for Alzheimer’s

Science Friday explores women's heightened risk for Alzheimer's

More than two-thirds of the Americans living with Alzheimer’s are women — some like the character Alice in the movie “Still Alice,” who suffers from an early onset form of the disease.

Science Friday tackled that topic Friday, with guests Michael Greicius, MD, MPH, associate professor of neurology and director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders, and Roberta Diaz Brinton, PhD, professor of pharmacology at the University of Southern California. The two quickly disputed the belief that more women get Alzheimer’s disease because they live longer.

“The way women age puts them at risk,” Brinton said. As they transition through menopause, some women develop cognitive symptoms such as insomnia, depression and short-term memory loss, leaving them at greater risk for Alzheimer’s, she explained.

Women who have a form of a gene called APOE-e4 are particularly at risk, although it doesn’t seem to affect men, Greicius said. The gene interacts with estrogen.

Scientists are continuing to decipher the link between estrogen and Alzheimer’s and the possibility of hormone therapies, as well as the connection — if any — between pregnancy and Alzheimer’s risk, the scientists told listeners.

The 18-minute segment is available here.

Previously: Blocking a receptor on brain’s immune cells counters Alzheimer’s in mice, The state of Alzheimer’s research: A conversation with Stanford neurologist Michael Greicius, Having a copy of ApoE4 gene variant doubles Alzheimer’s risk for women but not for men and The toll of Alzheimer’s on caretakers

Aging, Genetics, In the News, Mental Health, Neuroscience, Research, Women's Health

Are women at greater risk for Alzheimer’s? Stanford expert to discuss on today’s Science Friday

Are women at greater risk for Alzheimer’s? Stanford expert to discuss on today's Science Friday

2187905205_158290644d_zConfession: I named my parents’ cat (who died recently) Watson after listening to Ira Flatow interview James Watson, PhD, while driving cross country with my dad in 2000. Both before and after the all-critical cat-name-inspiring program, Science Friday has been a part of my Friday as often as I can squeeze it in.

So I was happy to hear that today’s program (which airs locally from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on KQED) will feature Stanford’s Michael Greicius, MD, MPH. He’ll be talking about Alzheimer’s disease and why the disease affects men and women differently.

Greicius, medical director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders, has worked with the gene variant known as ApoE4 – the largest single genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s, particularly for women. Last spring, he published a study showing that healthy ApoE4-positive women were twice as likely to contract the disease as their ApoE4-negative counterparts.

Greicius is expected to be on in the second hour, from 12 to 1 p.m. Pacific time.

Previously: Blocking a receptor on brain’s immune cells counters Alzheimer’s in mice, Examining the potential of creating new synapses in old or damaged brains, The state of Alzheimer’s research: A conversation with Stanford neurologist Michael Greicius and Having a copy of ApoE4 gene variant doubles Alzheimer’s risk for women but not for men
Photo by *Ann Gordon

Mental Health, Parenting, Pediatrics, Pregnancy, Women's Health

“2020 Mom Project” promotes awareness of perinatal mood disorders

"2020 Mom Project" promotes awareness of perinatal mood disorders

3505373098_0c1961a29a_zHaving a baby is a huge life alteration – who wouldn’t be at least a bit anxious? The vast majority of women experience mood shifts surrounding pregnancy: Around 80 percent experience “baby blues,” and in up to 20 percent this develops into something more serious. But most of these women go untreated, and many undiagnosed.

The California Maternal Mental Health Collaborative (which is changing its name to “The 2020 Mom Project” as they expand outside California) is spearheading efforts to get the word out about perinatal mood disorders. Last Friday, they hosted a seminar on emerging considerations in maternal mental health. As a birth doula, I was particularly happy to listen in. The keynote speakers approached the issue from a pointedly broad perspective, considering the social, economic, and cultural factors that influence health problems and care provision. The take-home message was that to address perinatal mood disorders, we need to address the context in which they happen, including protecting tomorrow’s moms while they are children today.

Vincent Felitti, MD, professor of medicine at UC San Diego and founder of the California Institutes of Preventive Medicine, has done extensive research on how “adverse childhood experiences” affect health by correlating an “ACE score” of self-reported negative experiences such as abuse, neglect, or household dysfunction with incidence of disease. The top-10 causes of death in the U.S. are strongly correlated with high ACE scores. Moreover, so are their risk factors! Much abuse of alcohol, drugs, and food is a coping mechanism for prior traumas. “What we see as the problem turns out to be somebody’s solution to problems we know nothing about,” Feletti said. “Depression is considered a disease, but what if it was a normal response to adverse life experiences? ACE score statistics support this.”

In a similar vein, Calvin Hobel, MD, an obstetrician-gynecologist at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, spoke about how maternal stress surrounding pregnancy causes complications and adverse child outcomes, including premature birth. Stress causes uterine irritability, which causes cervical changes that favor pre-term delivery. It signals to the placenta that things aren’t going well, and the baby better get out early. Just as soldiers with stressful backgrounds are more at risk for PTSD, moms who’ve had a rough life are more stress-reactive and less prepared to cope with the demands of motherhood.

Continue Reading »

Cardiovascular Medicine, Health and Fitness, Public Health, Research, Women's Health

Even moderate exercise appears to provide heart-health benefits to middle-aged women

Even moderate exercise appears to provide heart-health benefits to middle-aged women

woman on bike

It’s no secret that exercise offers a plethora of health benefits; tons of research has established that. But I was still heartened to read about a new study showing that physically active middle-aged women had lower risks of heart disease, stroke and blood clots than did their inactive counterparts. (I read about the work on my phone as I walked home from a barre class last night, which made me feel especially happy about having had just worked out.)

Researchers from University of Oxford looked at data from 1.1 million women in the United Kingdom, who were followed for an average of nine years. From an American Heart Association release:

In the study:

  • Women who performed strenuous physical activity— enough to cause sweating or a faster heart beat — two to three times per week were about 20 percent less likely to develop heart disease, strokes or blood clots compared to participants who reported little or no activity.
  • Among active women, there was little evidence of further risk reductions with more frequent activity.

Physical activities associated with reduced risk included walking, gardening, and cycling.

Lead author Miranda Armstrong, MPhil, PhD, commented that “inactive middle-aged women should try to do some activity regularly,” but then noted that the results suggest that “to prevent heart disease, stroke and blood clots, our results suggest that women don’t need to do very frequent activity.” That’s good news, ladies!

The study appears in the journal Circulation.

Previously: Lack of exercise shown to have largest impact on heart disease risk for women over 30, Exercise is valuable in preventing sedentary death, Study shows regular physical activity, even modest amounts, can add years to your life, CDC report shows exercise becoming a popular prescription among doctors and Brisk walking reduces stroke risk among women
Image by Thomas Hawk

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