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Global Health, Mental Health, Research, Sexual Health, Women's Health

Exploring links between domestic violence, depression and reproductive health

Exploring links between domestic violence, depression and reproductive health

abused womanIt’s no surprise that domestic violence has effects that ripple outward in a victim’s life, beyond physical traces of abuse. Research into just what those effects are can help physicians provide better counseling and treatment, and two new studies show striking correlations between domestic violence, mental illness, and contraception use.

The first study, published in Depression and Anxiety, enrolled a nationally representative sample of more than 1,000 mothers with no previous history of depression, and assessed them over 10 years. It was headed by Isabelle Ouellet-Morin, PhD, researcher at the University of Montreal. Thirty-three percent of the women reported being the victim of violence from their partner, and these women had a twofold increase in their risk of suffering from new-onset depression (after controlling for childhood maltreatment, socioeconomic deprivation, antisocial personality, and young motherhood). Compared with women who had never been victims of violence, women who were abused both in childhood and adulthood were 4-7 times more likely to suffer from depression. The results were similar for psychotic symptoms.

Louise Arseneault, PhD, co-author and professor of developmental psychology at Kings College London, is quoted in PsychCentral:

Health professionals need to be very aware of the possibility that women who experience mental health problems may also be the victims of domestic violence and vice versa. Given the prevalence of depression in these victims, we need to prevent these situations and take action. These acts of violence do more than leave physical damage; they leave psychological scars as well.

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Aging, Chronic Disease, Events, Health Policy, Neuroscience, Public Health, Women's Health

Alzheimer’s forum with Rep. Jackie Speier spurs conversation, activism

Alzheimer's forum with Rep. Jackie Speier spurs conversation, activism

10776927963_3dd8d244da_zWhat happens when you bring together a woman with Alzheimer’s, a congresswoman, a policy expert and two doctors? No, this isn’t a joke – but an intro to an informative and wide-ranging discussion on Alzheimer’s disease and its effects on women.

“I was pretty ignorant until fairly recently,” said Rep. Jackie Speier (D-CA), who organized the forum Alzheimer’s: A women’s health issue held in San Mateo, Calif. yesterday. She also penned an opinion piece published recently in the San Francisco Chronicle. “I had no idea that two out of three people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s are women.”

Although it’s the fifth leading cause of death in California, Alzheimer’s receives much less federal money than many other major diseases, she said.

To spur conversation and provide information, Speier invited Cynthia Ortiz Guzman, a former nurse who suffers from Alzheimer’s; Ruth Gay, director of public policy and advocacy for the Alzheimer’s Association; Elizabeth Landsverk, MD, medical director of ElderConsult, and Stanford’s Michael Greicius, MD, MPH, an associate professor of neurology and neurology and medical director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders. Greicius has done research on women’s risk of the disease.

Nearly all of the 150-plus people who attended the forum had a loved one who suffered from Alzheimer’s. “We still have a good life, but there is so much that needs to be done,” Guzman told them.

Greicius and Landsverk fielded questions about how to diagnose and treat Alzheimer’s as well as promising directions of research.

At Stanford, Greicius said a person with memory impairment would meet with a neurologist, take a several hour neuropsychological exam, have bloods tests and a brain scan, and meet with social workers and nurses. He emphasized that this is far above the level of care available in more community medical centers. Sometimes physicians are able to find biomarkers that signal Alzheimer’s presence more than a decade before symptoms appear he said.

Greicius urged attendees to find out if they’re eligible for a neurological research trial at Stanford and to consider donating their brains and the brains of their loved ones to use for research. He also thanked Speier for focusing attention on Alzheimer’s.

“We’ve got to get the attention of policymakers to address this issue,” Speier said, adding that she might try to secure federal funds as part of the defense budget.

Gay, who recently traveled to Washington, D.C. to advocate for the disease, agreed. “We know that today we need a game changer – we need people to step forward and speak out about this disease,” she said.

Previously: Science Friday explores women’s heightened risk for Alzheimer’s, The state of Alzheimer’s research: A conversation with Stanford neurologist Michael Greicius and The toll of Alzheimer’s on caretakers 
Photo by Marjan Lazarevski

Global Health, Pediatrics, Sexual Health, Women's Health

Rape prevention program in Kenya attracting media attention, funding

Rape prevention program in Kenya attracting media attention, funding

stop rape signI’ve written previously about No Means No Worldwide, a non-profit that has partnered with several Stanford researchers to document the success of their self-defense programs for preventing rapes of girls in Nairobi, Kenya. Over the last week, the program has garnered some wonderful news coverage of its complementary program to educate boys about their responsibility for stopping rape, including a Reuters story that describes how some schoolboys halted the sexual assault of a young girl:

Having been trained to defend girls against sexual assault, the boy called other young men to help him confront the man and rescue the child.

“It would have been fatal,” said Collins Omondi, who taught the boy as part of a program to stamp out violence against women and girls in Nairobi slums. “If this man would have assaulted this kid, he would have thrown her inside the river.”

The Reuters story also mentions some very heartening news: Thanks to funding from the British government, all of Nairobi’s 130,000 secondary school students will undergo the six-week No Means No Worldwide programs for girls and boys by the end of 2017.

Upworthy has also covered the programs’ success. From their story:

In many parts of the world, assault prevention starts and ends with what women can do to avoid putting themselves in “high-risk” situations. These are not effective.

Researchers used Kenya’s scenario to test the two methods. One group of women received the No Means No [empowerment and self-defense] training while the other took a life-skills class. Girls who received the No Means No training saw a nearly 40% decrease in rapes in the year following the program. Girls who took the life-skills offering were raped at the same rate.

Not only is teaching women how to avoid “high-risk” situations ineffective, but it shifts the blame to the victim for being raped instead of putting it on the rapist for actually committing the crime.

Committing a crime is a choice, and the No Means No program empowers young boys to choose not to commit that crime.

Previously: Empowerment training prevents rape of Kenyan girls and Self-defense training reduces rapes in Kenya
Photo by Steve McClaughin

Patient Care, Pregnancy, Stanford News, Women's Health

New obstetric hemorrhage tool kit released today

New obstetric hemorrhage tool kit released today

pregnantbelly-3A few years ago, when my niece was born, my sister had a severe postpartum hemorrhage. I remember getting off the phone with my mom, who had just delivered the simultaneous news of the baby’s birth and my sister’s serious condition, and feeling terrified. My sister was being taken into surgery to try to stop the bleeding. What if she died? In the U.S., deaths from postpartum hemorrhage are rare, but they do happen.

The first thing that gave me a sense of reassurance, strangely, was a search of the medical database PubMed. After I got off the phone, I sat at my laptop looking at a multicolored flow chart that summarized how to stop an obstetric hemorrhage. All of the steps taken by my sister’s medical team were listed. Although she was hundreds of miles away, I felt comforted by the knowledge that her doctors were following well-established, evidence-based guidelines for what to do.

It wasn’t until a few minutes later that I realized the flow chart was developed by doctors I know. It was part of the Obstetric Hemorrhage Toolkit, a set of guidelines published by the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative (CMQCC). I had first heard of the toolkit from a Stanford obstetric anesthesiologist who helped put it together, but had never imagined it might save someone in my family.

The toolkit was developed because maternal hemorrhages are rare, risky, and extremely time-sensitive. The kit gives medical teams the information they need to rehearse for, recognize and treat these hemorrhages immediately, without wasting minutes that could save the patient’s life.

Today, the CMQCC is releasing a new version of the toolkit. The update strengthens several areas of the kit, providing clearer parameters for use of certain medications and blood products and more information about how to support patients and families after a maternal hemorrhage, for instance.

And the flow chart I found calming is still there, on page 21 of this .pdf file. I’m so happy to see it again because, for me, it symbolizes the doctors, patients and families who will benefit from the kit in the future.

As for my family’s story, my mom called back later on the evening of my niece’s birth to tell me that the bleeding had stopped and my sister was recovering. Her introduction to motherhood was rougher than most, but today my sister and her daughter are fine: My favorite moment of a recent family gathering was seeing my chubby-cheeked niece racing toward me yelling “Aunnnnntie Errrrin!” with my beloved sister in hot pursuit behind her.

Previously: In poorest countries, increase in midwives could save mothers and their babies, Cardiac arrest in pregnancy: New consensus statement addresses CPR for expectant moms and Program focuses on treatment of placental disorders
Photo by bies

Cancer, Genetics, In the News, Women's Health

Angelina Jolie Pitt’s New York Times essay praised by Stanford cancer expert

Angelina Jolie Pitt's New York Times essay praised by Stanford cancer expert

4294641229_c78b406658_zYou’ve likely heard today about Angelina Jolie Pitt’s New York Times essay regarding her decision to have her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed. Women who carry mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have a significantly increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer; Jolie carries such a mutation, and in 2013 she shared publicly her decision to have her breasts removed to reduce her risk of cancer.

Jolie Pitt shares her decision-making process and notes that though she won’t be able to have any more children and though she still remains prone to cancer, she feels “at ease with whatever will come.” She closes her latest essay by writing, “It is not easy to make these decisions. But it is possible to take control and tackle head-on any health issue. You can seek advice, learn about the options and make choices that are right for you.”

After reading the piece I reached out to Stanford cancer geneticist Allison Kurian, MD, who told me:

Angelina Jolie made a very courageous decision to share her experience publicly.  The surgery she chose is strongly recommended for all women with BRCA1/2 mutations by age 40, since it’s the only way to prevent an ovarian cancer in these high-risk women, and early detection doesn’t work. This is a life-saving intervention for high-risk women.

Kurian is associate director of the Stanford Program in Clinical Cancer Genetics and a member of the Stanford Cancer Institute. In 2012 she published on online tool to help women with BRCA mutations understand their treatment options.

Previously: Helping inform tough cancer-related decisions, NIH Director highlights Stanford research on breast cancer surgery choices and Breast cancer patients are getting more bilateral mastectomies – but not any survival benefit
Photo by Marco Musso

Imaging, In the News, NIH, Pregnancy, Research, Women's Health

NIH puts focus on the placenta, the “fascinating” and “least understood” organ

NIH puts focus on the placenta, the "fascinating" and "least understood" organ

ultrasoundLast week, the NIH announced its support for an initiative to study how new technologies can shed light on the placenta’s function and health during pregnancy. Considering how crucial the placenta is to not only the health of a woman and her fetus during pregnancy, but also to the lifelong health of both, it’s surprising to hear the NIH call it “the least understood human organ.”

Currently, doctors and scientists can only gather information about the placenta by using ultrasounds and blood tests, and by examining it after delivery. What if new sensors could track how well blood, oxygen, and nutrients are flowing to the fetus, or if new imaging technologies could assess how well the placenta is attaching to the uterine wall? What if biotechnology could assess the effects of environmental factors on the placenta, such as air pollution, maternal diet, and medications?

Better understanding and monitoring of this temporary organ promises to improve maternal and child health. Placental issues can contribute to negative pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, preterm birth, and stillbirth, and they’ve also been linked to a higher risk of heart disease later in life, for both mother and child.

This is the third and largest funding announcement for the NIH’s Human Placenta Project, led by the NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and cosponsored by the NIH’s National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

Calling the placenta a “fascinating organ” and the “lifeline that gives us our start in the world” Alan E. Guttmacher, MD, director of the NICHHD, also said in an NIH press release:

We hope this funding opportunity will attract a broad range of researchers and clinicians to help — placental biologists, obstetricians, and experts in imaging, bioengineering, and other arenas… For researchers who want to apply their skills in an area of medicine that isn’t being looked at as much as both scientific opportunity and human health warrant, this is a wonderful chance.

Previously: Placenta, the video game, The placenta sacrifices itself to keep baby healthy in case of starvation and Program focuses on the treatment of placental disorders
Related: Too deeply attached and A most mysterious organ
Photo by thinkpanama

Mental Health, Parenting, Pregnancy, Women's Health

A telephone lifeline for moms with postpartum depression

A telephone lifeline for moms with postpartum depression

Van_Gogh_-_Madame_Augustine_Roulin_mit_BabyI’m currently pregnant and due in less than two weeks. It’s my second child, so I’m not as worried about caring for a newborn as I was the first time around. But one nagging worry I have is the risk of postpartum depression, sometimes called postnatal depression. I have a family history of depression and that puts me at higher risk. Luckily, it wasn’t a problem with my firstborn, but it can crop up in later pregnancies – and scientists don’t entirely understand the reasons for it.

Postpartum depression usually hits four to six weeks after delivery—though it can show up months later. It’s characterized by feeling overwhelmed, trapped, guilty or inadequate, along with crying, irritability, problems concentrating, loss of appetite or libido, or sleep problems. An estimated 9 to 16 percent of new mothers are affected by postpartum depression. Even men are known to suffer from it sometimes. PPD affects not just the mother (or father), but can have lasting effects on the child as well, so helping these parents through a difficult and isolating time is critical

Now, a study published in Journal of Advanced Nursing shows that providing a social network for new moms, via phone calls from other mothers who had recovered from PPD, could alleviate symptoms for moms in the study for up to two years after delivery. A news release summarized the findings:

For the present quasi-experimental study, researchers recruited 64 mothers with depression up to two years after delivery who were living in New Brunswick. Peer volunteers who recovered from postnatal depression were trained as peer support and provided an average of nine support calls. The average age of mothers was 26 years, with 77% reporting depressive symptoms prior to pregnancy and 57% having pregnancy complications. There were 16 women (35%) who were taking medication for depression since the birth.

I find the idea that this insidious problem could be tackled with a phone version of the ubiquitous and valuable moms’ groups an uplifting one. Compared to drug treatments, regular phone calls from a peer who’s gone through something similar is a relatively cheap treatment. Further studies are needed, but I’ll be watching to see whether this approach takes hold as a standard intervention for PPD.

Previously: “2020 Mom Project” promotes awareness of perinatal mood disorders,  Is postpartum depression more of an urban problem?, Helping moms emerge from the darkness of postpartum depression, Breastfeeding difficulties may lead to depression in new moms, and Dads get postpartum depression, too
Image by Van Gogh

Mental Health, NIH, Pregnancy, Research, Women's Health

Women who have a stillbirth are more likely to experience long-term depression, study shows

Women who have a stillbirth are more likely to experience long-term depression, study shows

5614885964_e75f4261b2_zAny serious loss requires grieving time, and the birth of stillborn child is no exception. However, a recent study suggests that women who have experienced a stillbirth should be monitored for depressive symptoms well after the standard six-month grieving period – up to three years, in fact. Among women who have given birth and who have no history of depression, women who have had a stillbirth are at significantly higher risk of developing long-term depression.

The research was conducted by the NIH’s Stillbirth Collaborate Research Network (SCRN), which defines stillbirth as the death of a baby at or after the 20th week of pregnancy. It occurs in 1 out of 160 pregnancies in the United States, a surprisingly high ratio.

This study is the first to show definitively that women who have no history of depression may face a risk for it many months after a stillbirth

From 2006-2008, the researchers enrolled nearly 800 women from 59 hospitals across the U.S., around a third of whom had delivered a stillbirth (with the other two-thirds having had delivered a healthy baby). In 2009, the women were asked to complete a questionnaire designed to gauge whether they were experiencing symptoms of depression.

After accounting for other factors related to depression and stillbirth among the more than 76 percent of women who did not have a history of depression, the researchers found that women who had a stillbirth were twice as likely to have a high depression score compared to women who had a live birth. This difference was even greater among those responding to the questionnaire 2-3 years after they had delivered, at nearly nine times as likely.

In an NIH article, author Carol Hogue, PhD, director of the Women’s and Children’s Center at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta and first author of the study, said, “Earlier studies have found that women with a history of depression are especially vulnerable to persistent depression after a stillbirth, even after the subsequent birth of a healthy child,” but this study is the first to show definitively that women who have no history of depression may face a risk for depression many months after a stillbirth.

The study appears in the March issue of the journal Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology.

Previously: 2020 Mom Project promotes awareness of perinatal mood disordersLosing Jules: Breaking the silence around stillbirth, A call to break the silence of stillbirth and Pregnancy loss puts parents’ relationship at risk
Photo by Gates Foundation

Cardiovascular Medicine, In the News, Public Health, Research, Women's Health

A look at why young women who have heart attacks delay seeking care

A look at why young women who have heart attacks delay seeking care

317916781_c8bb9b352e_zHeart attacks kill more than 15,000 women in the U.S. each year and are disproportionately deadly for females under the age of 55. Although several studies, including those by Stanford cardiologist Jennifer Tremmel, MD, have investigated the signs and consequences of heart attacks in men and women, relatively little is known about heart disease in women or why it’s so lethal for young females. And according to new research, misconceptions about the risk factors and signs of coronary heart disease may be why young females are less likely to recognize and seek emergency care for a heart attack.

In the study, published yesterday in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, a research team led by Judith Lichtman, PhD, MPH, of the Yale School of Public Health, interviewed 30 women between the ages of 30 to 55  who had been hospitalized for a heart attack. The researchers identified five common themes among the symptoms and treatments of the women they interviewed, and one potentially important finding was that women were unsure they’d had a heart attack so they were hesitant to seek medical treatment.

From an NPR story:

A heart attack doesn’t necessarily feel like a sudden painful episode that ends in collapse, [Lichtman] notes. And women are more likely than men to experience vague symptoms like nausea or pain down their arms.

“Women may experience a combination of things they don’t always associate with a heart attack,” Lichtman says. “Maybe we need to do a better job of explaining and describing to the public what a heart attack looks and feels like.”

Tremmel also provided comment on the study, saying it indicates a need to encourage women to seek help for medical concerns. “This is an ongoing issue in the medical field,” she said. “…We all have to empower women patients, so they know that they need to not be so worried about going to the hospital if they’re afraid there’s something wrong.”

Previously: New test could lead to increase of women diagnosed with heart attack, Heart attacks and chest pain: Understanding the signs in young womenAsk Stanford Med: Cardiologist Jennifer Tremmel responds to questions on women’s heart healthPaper highlights major differences in disease between men and women and Gap exists in women’s knowledge of heart disease
Photo by Simon Mason

Aging, Chronic Disease, In the News, Media, Neuroscience, Women's Health

Science Friday explores women’s heightened risk for Alzheimer’s

Science Friday explores women's heightened risk for Alzheimer's

More than two-thirds of the Americans living with Alzheimer’s are women — some like the character Alice in the movie “Still Alice,” who suffers from an early onset form of the disease.

Science Friday tackled that topic Friday, with guests Michael Greicius, MD, MPH, associate professor of neurology and director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders, and Roberta Diaz Brinton, PhD, professor of pharmacology at the University of Southern California. The two quickly disputed the belief that more women get Alzheimer’s disease because they live longer.

“The way women age puts them at risk,” Brinton said. As they transition through menopause, some women develop cognitive symptoms such as insomnia, depression and short-term memory loss, leaving them at greater risk for Alzheimer’s, she explained.

Women who have a form of a gene called APOE-e4 are particularly at risk, although it doesn’t seem to affect men, Greicius said. The gene interacts with estrogen.

Scientists are continuing to decipher the link between estrogen and Alzheimer’s and the possibility of hormone therapies, as well as the connection — if any — between pregnancy and Alzheimer’s risk, the scientists told listeners.

The 18-minute segment is available here.

Previously: Blocking a receptor on brain’s immune cells counters Alzheimer’s in mice, The state of Alzheimer’s research: A conversation with Stanford neurologist Michael Greicius, Having a copy of ApoE4 gene variant doubles Alzheimer’s risk for women but not for men and The toll of Alzheimer’s on caretakers

Stanford Medicine Resources: