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Health and Fitness, Technology, Videos

Wireless stick-on patch could make continuous health monitoring more flexible and practical

Wireless stick-on patch could make continuous health monitoring more flexible and practical

Stress tests or sleep studies are two examples of when long-term clinical monitoring are necessary. But bulky wires, sensors, or tape used during these studies can inhibit the natural movements of test subjects and potentially skew outcomes. In an effort to solve this issue, researchers at Northwestern University developed a wearable patch that adheres to the skin, easily stretches and moves with the body, gathers physiological statistics, and can send wireless updates to a cellphone or computer.

A recent post on Futurity offers more details about how the device, which stick to the skin like a temporary tattoo, was designed:

Researchers turned to soft microfluidic designs to address the challenge of integrating relatively big, bulky chips with the soft, elastic base of the patch. The patch is constructed of a thin elastic envelope filled with fluid. The chip components are suspended on tiny raised support points, bonding them to the underlying patch but allowing the patch to stretch and move.

One of the biggest engineering feats of the patch is the design of the tiny, squiggly wires connecting the electronics components—radios, power inductors, sensors, and more. The serpentine-shaped wires are folded like origami, so that no matter which way the patch bends, twists or stretches, the wires can unfold in any direction to accommodate the motion. Since the wires stretch, the chips don’t have to.

The article goes on to discuss the potential of wearable electronic devices in health care, including the possibility of detecting motions associated with Parkinson’s disease at its onset.

Previously: Ultra-thin flexible device offers non-invasive method of monitoring heart health, blood pressure, New method for developing flexible nanowire electronics could yield ultrasensitive biosensors and Stanford researchers develop a new biosensor chip that could speed drug development

Pediatrics, Sleep

How sleep benefits those with a rare neurological disease

How sleep benefits those with a rare neurological disease

In the latest Huffington Post blog entry from the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, a pediatric neurologist highlights a rare neurological disease that’s characterized by an improvement of symptoms after sleep. Mara Cvejic, MD, shares the dramatic story of a young patient, writing:

As a sleep physician today, Jane’s face still haunts me — but in a good way. The miracles of sleep are too numerous for the scope of this article, but there is plenty of undisputed evidence to show that healthy sleep improves our mood, our heart, our ability to eat healthy, to exercise, and perform at our best during the day at work or school. It is even linked to lower cancer rates. But can it take away what appears to be Parkinson’s disease and make a little girl walk? Oddly, that answer is yes. Jane had Segawa’s disease.

Read on for the full story.

Previously: Stanford center launches Huffington Post blog on the “very mysterious process” of sleep

Science, Technology

Survey says: Americans split on the future of science

Mechanics of Time TravelIf you’re feeling sciencey, check out a Pew Research Center survey completed with Smithsonian Magazine and released yesterday. You’ll see the percentage of Americans surveyed who would welcome or dismiss personal robots servants, driverless cars or other futuristic possibilities, given the options.

piece published on the blog re/code reports:

Asked what inventions they most want to take advantage of themselves, participants repeatedly landed on three themes: Medical strides that extend human longevity, flying cars or personal space crafts, and time travel.

On the other hand, nearer realities like robot caregivers, face computers, genetic engineering and drones seem to give a lot of people the heebie-jeebies. Among the findings:

  • 65 percent think it would be a change for the worse if lifelike robots become the primary caregivers for the elderly and people in poor health.
  • 63 percent think it would be a change for the worse if personal and commercial drones are given permission to fly through most U.S. airspace.
  • 53 percent think it would be a change for the worse if most people wear implants or other devices that constantly show them information about the world around them.

What do you think?

Previously: Using personal robots to overstep disabilityHelping the public make sense of scientific research and Hey, president-to-be: What are your views on science?
Via Kara Swisher
Photo by Bob Owen

Orthopedics, Technology

“Intelligent” liner may improve prosthetic limb fit and function

0984-FieldsRuns200.jpgWhen I lived in the triathlete town of San Diego and tagged along for fun with a group who trained, a kind young man always gave me an encouraging word or high-five as he zoomed past me while running or cove swimming. He has a prosthetic leg, and although the device that helps him move around was clearly functional, and even sounded springy on the pavement, I wondered if a small shift in alignment could cause a great deal of discomfort.

This thought came back today as I came across news about an “intelligent” liner for better-fitting prostheses. A prototype of the device, which is being developed by researchers at the University of Southampton, uses sensors to detect pressure and forces at the point of contact between a patient’s stump and the prosthesis. Information on limb loading could lead to a better fitting and perhaps self-adjusting prosthesis, according to a release, which also notes:

There are 50,000 lower-limb amputees in the UK, most of whom use artificial limbs that are attached to the residual limb through a socket. No two stumps are exactly the same shape and size and even an individual’s stump can change shape over the course of a single day.

Pain, discomfort and ulceration are frequently experienced at the socket interface due to poor fit. This stems from the excessive build-up of pressure within the limb socket (causing high ‘loads’ on the stump).

Synthetic liners, worn like a sock over the stump, provide some cushioning against the hard socket, but at present there is no convenient way to accurately measure the critical loads at this interface in the clinic. Without this information, prosthetists face difficulty in fitting replacement limbs and the outcomes for patients are variable.

According to the non-profit Amuptee Coalition, nearly two million people in the United States live with limb loss.

Previously: Stanford graduates partner with clinics in developing countries to test low-cost prostheticBiotech start-up builds artful artificial limbs and Two Stanford students’ $20 device to treat clubfoot in developing countries
Photo by U.S. Army

Neuroscience, Research, Technology, Videos

Using Google Glass to improve quality of life for Parkinson’s patients

Using Google Glass to improve quality of life for Parkinson's patients

Researchers at Newcastle University are exploring ways that Google Glass could improve Parkinson’s patients’ quality of life by assisting them in placing phone calls, reminding them to take their medications or giving them behavioral prompts, such as speaking louder. In the video above, Roisin McNaney, a PhD student in the university’s Digital Interaction Group, explains how using Glass could ease patients’ anxiety about encountering a symptom-related problem while in public, raise patients’ confidence and, ultimately, make them more independent.

Previously: Abraham Verghese uses Google Glass to demonstrate how to begin a patient exam, Revealed: The likely role of Parkinson’s protein in the healthy brain and Stanford study identifies molecular mechanism that triggers Parkinson’s
Via Medgadget

In the News, Nutrition, Research

Examining how food texture impacts perceived calorie content

Examining how food texture impacts perceived calorie content

brownies_041614The texture of a food – whether it’s creamy or crunchy – may influence a person’s overall consumption and his perception on whether the food is calorie-rich or diet-friendly. That’s according to findings recently published in the Journal of Consumer Research.

For the study, researchers conducted five laboratory studies during which individuals were asked to sample hard, soft, rough or smooth foods and then give calorie estimations for each food. During one of the experiments, participants were asked to watch TV ads while eating bit-sized brownies. As the Huffington Post reports:

… half of the participants were asked to estimate how many calories they thought the brownies had, while the other half were not. Within these groups, half of the participants were given brownie bits that were soft, while the others were given ones that were hard.

Among the participants who were not asked to focus on the calorie content of the brownies, they consumed more soft brownie bits than hard brownie bits. However, among the participants who were asked to focus on the calorie content, they consumed more of the hard brownie bits than the soft ones.

The study is part of a growing body of scientific evidence showing that several factors can impact whether we consider foods to be healthy or fattening and how much we eat. Past research has shown that people frequently underestimate the calories they’re eating and that many of us tend to overeat in sit-down restaurants rather than fast-food spots. Additionally, the sequence of foods may affect how we calculate calorie content, and the color of tableware can influence how much we eat.

Previously: Obesity and smoking together may decrease taste of fat and sweet but increase consumption, Cereal-eaters: How much are you really consuming?, Fruit-filled Manga comics may increase kids’ consumption of healthy food, and Can dish color influence how much you eat?
Photo by Sarah

Autoimmune Disease, Chronic Disease, Clinical Trials, Patient Care

Two decades with scleroderma: How I find answers to hard-to-solve questions

The day I was diagnosed with scleroderma 21 years ago was devastating for my parents and me, to say the least. I was 15 years old and I remember thinking: I have what? Scleroderma? What is that? Can you spell that?

Not much was known about the disease and, since the Internet was in its infancy, we couldn’t simply Google “scleroderma” to learn more about it or find support groups. There was no one to bounce off ideas with. My father, who was a diligent researcher, consulted medical textbooks. Meanwhile, my mother, who was born with the “gift of gab,” sought information from anyone and everyone who crossed her path. But ultimately we were forced to rely heavily on doctors’ recommendations, which sadly were pretty gloomy and a bit much for a teenager to handle.

Fast forward to today. When I have a question, I connect with my local chapter of the Scleroderma Foundation, either by e-mailing a board member or by attending a support group meeting. I also go online to the Raynauds Association, Scleroderma Foundation and Pulmonary Hypertension Association. Above all it’s important to find a rheumatologist who is not only knowledgeable about scleroderma, but has a good grasp of its complexities and is willing to help you get the results you need. Trust me – they are out there!

Back in 2004, I decided it was time to get a new rheumatologist. I asked around for recommendations from my personal network and a friend with rheumatoid arthritis suggested I see her physician. Before meeting the doctor, I looked at his online reviews from other patients and his curriculum vitae to get a sense of his academic and professional experience and achievements. When meeting with a new physician, it’s important to ask if she/he has treated other scleroderma patients, gauge their knowledge of clinical trials, find out if they are up to date on the medications being used to treat the different facets of the disease, and make sure they understand the importance of certain annual tests.

When I switched rheumatologists, I had a particular problem I needed to solve. For the most part my illness had become stable, but I had one pesky ulcer that was truly relentless! I tried various calcium channel blockers, ACE Inhibitors, and Vasodilators, and nothing worked. The infections were getting out of control, even though I did my best to stay on top of it. My frustration reached a point where I asked my doctor to “please, remove the first flange of my index finger.” Thankfully he refused and said, “No, we’re not going to give up.”

Continue Reading »

Events, Medicine and Literature, Medicine and Society

Intersection of arts and medicine a benefit to both, report finds

Intersection of arts and medicine a benefit to both, report finds

An article today on Cleveland.com notes that, at least in Northeast Ohio, collaboration between medicine and the arts benefits both camps as well as the region’s economic health. A preliminary report from the non-profit Community Partnership for Arts and Culture looks at ways art and medicine enrich one another in Cleveland and provides recommendations for enhancing those partnerships. From the news piece:

The report identifies four principal ways in which the art and medicine intersect productively:

• The use of arts and culture in medical settings;

• Participatory programs that involve patients and communities in activities and therapies that promote positive medical outcomes and general wellness;

• The potential shown by arts and culture to serve as a rallying point from which public health and social equity can be addressed; and

• The enrichment of medical training.

Meanwhile, at Stanford, art and science lovers prepare for this evening’s Medicine and the Muse symposium, featuring author Khaled Hosseini, MD. Stay tuned for a recap on Scope next week.

Previously: Stanford’s Medicine and the Muse symposium features author of “The Kite Runner”, Literature and medicine at life’s end and Thoughts on the arts and humanities in shaping a medical career

Autism, Behavioral Science, Pediatrics, Stanford News

Home videos could help diagnose autism, says new Stanford study

Home videos could help diagnose autism, says new Stanford study

Autism is more complex to diagnose than many other childhood conditions. There’s no physical sign or lab test; rather, making the diagnosis requires careful observation for clues such as poor language and social skills or repetitive behaviors. Standard diagnostic tests take several hours of a professional’s time, and families may wait months to see someone who can assess their child.

But new research from Stanford and Harvard Medical School suggests that faster diagnoses might become possible. The research team, whose findings appear today in PLOS ONE, tested whether short home videos could be harnessed to speed the process. Using a scoring system that was pared down from the “gold standard” diagnostic test, they assessed kids’ behavior in 100 short videos pulled from YouTube. About half of the videos showed children with autism; the rest did not. The scoring system classified 97 percent of the videos accurately.

The system is unlikely to replace traditional diagnostic methods, but could help relieve the diagnostic bottleneck, study author Dennis Wall, PhD, explained in our press release:

“For instance, we could use this system for clinical triage, as a way to channel traffic so that children can get the kind of attention they need as early as possible,” Wall said. Children who clearly have autism might be diagnosed primarily with videos and quickly started on therapy, freeing clinicians to spend more time evaluating children whose diagnosis is less clear-cut.

Home videos also provide information that is otherwise unavailable to those making the diagnosis, Wall said:

Another potential advantage of using video for diagnosis is that young children often behave differently in a doctor’s office than at home.

“Clinical settings are often stark, artificial and can elicit behaviors that are abnormal,” Wall said. “The odds are stacked against the diagnostic professional because the child is in an unknown environment with strangers.”

The researchers plan to explore whether the same method could also be used for making other behavior-based diagnoses, such as detecting attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder or adult-onset neurologic conditions such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease.

Previously: Using Kinect cameras to automate autism diagnosis, Director of Stanford Autism Center responds to your questions on research and treatment and New imaging analysis reveals distinct features of the autistic brain

Dermatology, Ethics, Health Costs, Research, Stanford News

Drug samples lead to more expensive prescriptions, Stanford study finds

Drug samples lead to more expensive prescriptions, Stanford study finds

drugs on money - big

It’s been years (fortunately) since I’ve needed a prescription for anything more than a simple antibiotic. But when I did, I remember I was always thankful on those occasions when my doctor offered a free sample of a medication to try before (or sometimes instead of) pulling out the prescription pad. I appreciated the chance to see if a medication would work for me, and I was happy for any opportunity to save myself (or, at times, my insurance company) a few dollars. The fact that the samples were invariably for drugs that were still on patent (known as brand name drugs or branded generics) to a particular company certainly escaped me.

Now, a study by Stanford dermatologist Al Lane, MD, highlights the dark side of such free samples, which are provided to doctors by the pharmaceutical companies who make the drugs. The research, along with an accompanying editorial, is published today in JAMA Dermatology. As Lane comments in my release on the work:

Physicians may not be aware of the cost difference between brand-name and generic drugs and patients may not realize that, by accepting samples, they could be unintentionally channeled into subsequently receiving a prescription for a more expensive medication.

Specifically, Lane and medical student Michael Hurley found that dermatologists with access to free drug samples wrote prescriptions for medications with a retail price of about twice that of prescriptions written by dermatologists without access to samples. All of the patients had the same first-time diagnosis of adult acne. The difference is nothing to sniff at – $465 for docs who accepted samples and about $200 for docs who did not. What’s more, the overall prescribing patterns of the two groups of physicians showed almost no overlap. Physicians without access to samples prescribed mainly generic drugs (83 percent of the time), whereas those with access to samples prescribed generics much less frequently (21 percent of the time). Only one drug of the top ten most commonly prescribed by physicians without access to samples even made it into the top ten list of physicians who did accept samples.

The distribution of free drug samples in this country is big business. It’s been estimated that pharmaceutical companies give away samples of medications with a retail value of about $16 billion every year. But many physicians feel the availability of samples doesn’t sway their prescribing choices, and instead feel the samples allow them more flexibility to treat their patients. Lane himself thought so, until Stanford Medicine prohibited physicians to accept samples or other industry gifts in 2006. As he explains in the release:

At one time, we at Stanford really felt that samples were a very important part of our practice. It seemed a good way to help poorer patients, who maybe couldn’t afford to pay for medications out-of-pocket, and we had the perception that this was very beneficial for patients. But the important question physicians should be asking themselves now is whether any potential, and as yet unproven, benefit in patient compliance, satisfaction or adherence is really worth the increased cost to patients and the health-care system.

Clearly Lane has had a change of heart, in part based on the data in the study. Now he’s hoping to get the word out to other physicians. He and Hurley conclude in the paper, “The negative consequences of free drug samples affect clinical practice on a national level, and policies should be in place to properly mitigate their inappropriate influence on prescribing patterns.”

Previously: Consumers’ behavior responsible for $163 billion in wasteful pharmacy-related costs and Stanford’s medical school expands its policy to limit industry access
Photo by StockMonkeys.com

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