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Nutrition, Pediatrics, Stanford News, Videos

Where is the love? A discussion of nutrition, health and repairing our relationship with food

Where is the love? A discussion of nutrition, health and repairing our relationship with food

Maya Adam, MD, a lecturer on child health and nutrition in Stanford’s Program in Human Biology, associates food with love. “Through food, we learn about where we come from, who we are, and in many ways who we want to be,” she said in a recent TEDxStanford talk. But, as in human relationships involving love, our encounters with food may involve fighting – and even tragedy and betrayal, she noted. She pointed to an antacid commercial’s presentation of a “food fight” between foods we consume to taste but that cause us indigestion and larger health problems over time.

Early in her medical training, Adam said, she learned that “pain is a protective sensation; it helps us to avoid things that could cause damage to our bodies.” Ignoring pain or masking it with antacids, as the ad suggests, sends the message that “we should medicate that sensation away and continue consuming the foods that are hurting us.” What’s more, she said, a cultural “war on food” is depleting our time, energy and joy around eating, all in the midst of an obesity epidemic.

In her talk, Adam, who teaches a massive open online course called “Child Nutrition and Cooking,” recommends examining our modern-day relationship with food, which has grown distant. Regaining a healthy relationship involves learning where food comes from and what’s inside it, and taking care to prepare and cook real food for yourself and loved ones, she said: “May the foods you eat be worthy of you, and may they be made with love.”

Previously: A spotlight on TEDxStanford’s “awe-inspiring” and “deeply moving” talks and Free Stanford online course on child nutrition & cooking

Cancer, Patient Care

“As a young lung cancer patient, I had to find my own path”: Fighting stage IV with full force

We’ve partnered with Inspire, a company that builds and manages online support communities for patients and caregivers, to launch a patient-focused series here on Scope. Once a month, patients affected by serious and often rare diseases share their unique stories; this month’s bonus column comes from patient advocate Emily Bennett Taylor.

When I was diagnosed at age 28 with stage IV lung cancer (yes, you read that right: 28. Non-smoker, college athlete, lung cancer), I wanted to shout it from the rooftops. No, not in the joyous, “share-my-news” type of way. The concept was so unfathomable that I sometimes felt the only way it would really sink in is if I screamed it out loud in public. I didn’t, of course. While many social norms, like dressing to leave the house or even showering, went completely out the window as I underwent treatment, I’m happy to report that I managed to maintain at least a semblance of sanity in public. And I’ve thankfully found better venues – such as this article – to share my story.

I learned very quickly that as a young lung cancer patient, I had to find my own path. In a cancer normally associated with older smokers, I was constantly telling my doctors: “I’m different. I’m strong. I want to be as aggressive as possible.” Standard of care is to treat stage IV patients palliatively, but that didn’t sit well with me – I wanted a cure. I was told “no” to surgery countless times. I kept seeking second, third, multitudes of opinions in order to find a doctor who would see me as the young, strong person I was with my whole life ahead of me.

While I tested negative for all known genetic mutations (I know one is out there – please find it for me!), I was fortunate to be part of a small percentage of patients who respond to traditional chemotherapy. After six rounds of carboplatin, Alimta and Avastin, and two additional infusions of Avastin, I found my white knight in Raja Flores, MD, of Mount Sinai Hospital. My husband and I relocated from our home in California to New York City for three months, and on February 8, 2013, Dr. Flores removed my entire right lung, pleura, half my diaphragm, all mediastinal lymph nodes, and the pericardial sac (around my heart), which he rebuilt with Gore-Tex.

Three weeks into my recovery, I began a follow-up course of 28 rounds of high-dose radiation to my right lung cavity. If there were any cancer cells left, Dr. Flores and I intended to fry them into oblivion – even if side effects had me vomiting and nauseated for the better part of six weeks, and exhausted for another six months.

My reward? Dr. Flores declared me N.E.D. – No Evidence of Disease. I’ve lived with that diagnosis for almost a year and a half now, and it feels fantastic.

Is life with one lung difficult? Sometimes. But the most important thing to me is that it’s still life. Lots of surgeons told me “no” because they believed removing a lung would diminish my “quality of life.” For me, losing a lung meant gaining my life, and that’s a trade-off I think any patient would make if given the choice.

If you’re a medical student looking for an area where you can make a serious impact, consider lung cancer. In the past few decades, survival rates for other major cancers (breast, prostate, colon) have increased to well above 50 percent, some reaching the upper 90s. Lung cancer, the nation’s No. 1 cancer killer? A dismal 16.8 percent.

This is a field ripe for advancement. We need researchers developing better treatments and methods of early detection. We need doctors who both understand that the face of lung cancer is changing and are also willing to push the envelope with their patients to find an individualized, aggressive cure.

Every lung cancer is different, and every patient deserves a treatment plan with the goal of preserving life. You can be the difference. You can make an impact. And you can change the course of someone’s life, just like Dr. Flores did for me.

Emily Bennett Taylor, a former state track champion, college volleyball player, and finance manager, is now a Stage IV lung cancer survivor and spokesperson/patient advocate for the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation. Her story has been highlighted on the Steve Harvey Show, the Atlantic Monthly, and on her blog - embenkickscancer.wordpress.com - named to Healthline’s Top Lung Cancer Blogs in 2013 and 2014.  She writes candidly about her treatment and life with one lung, as she works to raise awareness about the leading cancer killer.  Emily lives in Southern California with her husband Miles and their two lovable mutts, Ginny & Tonic.

Genetics, In the News, Pediatrics, Research

New Yorker story highlights NGLY1 research

New Yorker story highlights NGLY1 research

PackardGirl260x190The new issue of the New Yorker, out today, includes a fascinating medical story with a notable Stanford connection. As we’ve described before, a team of scientists from institutions around the world reported earlier this year on their discovery of a new genetic disease, NGLY1 deficiency. Stanford’s Gregory Enns, MB, ChB, was co-lead author of the paper describing the new finding, and one of his patients, Grace Wilsey, was among the small group of children in whom the disease first was identified. Grace’s inability to make tears when she cries was a key clue in unlocking the mystery of the disease.

But, as the New Yorker piece (subscription required) explains in detail, there’s much more to the story than that. In particular, it tells how the families of patients – especially Grace’s parents, Matt and Kristen Wilsey, and Matt and Cristina Might, who are the parents of index patient Bertrand Might – successfully encouraged researchers at different institutions to collaborate with each other in a way that advanced the discovery with exceptional speed. This was counter to the usual practice in science, the story explains. Typically, scientists avoid sharing data with competitors, even if doing so would advance the research:

If a team hunting for a new disease were to find a second case with the help of researchers from a competing lab, it could claim to have “solved” a new disease. But it would also have to share credit with competitors who may have done nothing more than grant access to existing data. When I asked [Duke University geneticist and NGLY1 deficiency co-discoverer Vandana] Shashi if she could imagine a scenario that would result in one research team’s publishing a paper with data from a different research group working on a similar project, she said, “Not that I can think of.”

David Goldstein [another Duke geneticist who collaborated with Shashi] added, “It’s not an overstatement to say that there are inherent conflicts of interest at work.” Daniel MacArthur, a genetics researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital, is even more blunt. “It’s an enormous deal,” he told me. “And it’s a big criticism of all of us, but it’s a criticism we all need to hear. The current academic publication system does patients an enormous disservice.”

Fortunately for patients like Grace and Bertrand, and for the doctors who want to help them, the culture is shifting. One marker of the shift is the NIH’s announcement earlier this month that it will be expanding its Undiagnosed Diseases Program to a network of seven sites across the country (including Stanford) and building in a requirement that all seven centers share data with each other.

Another is that researchers are realizing that families like the Wilseys and Mights will continue to make an impact. In fact, the Wilsey family has recently launched the Grace Wilsey Foundation to raise awareness about NGLY1 deficiency and promote investigation of possible treatments for the disease.

As Shashi puts it at the conclusion of the New Yorker story:

“Gone are the days when we could just say, ‘We’re a cloistered community of researchers, and we alone know how to do this.’”

Previously: NIH network designed to diagnose, develop possible treatments for rare, unidentified diseases and Crying without tears unlocks the mystery of a new genetic disease
Photo of Grace Wilsey courtesy of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford

Addiction, Emergency Medicine, Public Health, Research, Technology

Text messages after ER visit could reduce young adults’ binge drinking by more than 50 percent

Text messages after ER visit could reduce young adults' binge drinking by more than 50 percent

Bar_texting_0701414Researchers have demonstrated that text message programs can, among other things, help diabetes patients better manage their condition, assist smokers in kicking their nicotine habit, and encourage expecting mothers to get flu shots.

Now new findings published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine show that text messages can also be an effective tool for reducing binge drinking among young adults whose hazardous alcohol use has resulted in an emergency room visit. During a 12-week study, 765 patients who were treated in the emergency room and screened positive for a history of hazardous drinking were divided into three groups. The first group received text messages prompting them to respond to drinking-related queries and received text messages in return offering feedback aimed at either strengthening their low-risk drinking plan or promoting reflection on their drinking plan or decision not to set a low-risk goal. Another group received only text queries about their drinking, and the remaining individuals received no text messages.

A story published today on PsychCentral reports on the researchers’ results:

The group receiving both text message queries and feedback decreased their self-reported binge drinking days by 51 percent and decreased the number of self-reported drinks per day by 31 percent.

The groups that received only text messages or no text messages increased the number of binge drinking days.

“Illicit drugs and opiates grab all the headlines, but alcohol remains the fourth leading cause of preventable death in the U.S.,” said [Brian Suffoletto, MD, assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine].

“If we can intervene in a meaningful way in the health and habits of people when they are young, we could make a real dent in that tragic statistic. Alcohol may bring them to the ER, but we can do our part to keep them from becoming repeat visitors,” [he added].

Previously: CDC explores potential of using smartphones to collect public health data, Could better alcohol screening during doctor visits reduce underage drinking?, Personality-based approach can reduce teen drinking and The costs of college binge drinking
Photo by Anders Adermark

In the News, Science, Stanford News

Internships expose local high-schoolers to STEM careers and academic life

Internships expose local high-schoolers to STEM careers and academic life

beakersIt’s summertime: Do you know where your teenagers are? A piece in the Palo Alto Weekly discusses some of the choice science internships available to local high-school students at Stanford and other universities in the region. Shadowing scientists in the lab and even contributing to research, the young interns learn real-world applications for subjects they learn in school. They also gain work experience and exposure to academic careers in STEM fields. And a high-profile internship couldn’t hurt to include on college applications.

From the piece:

Coordinators often have to sift through hundreds of applications from students applying from all over the country and internationally. One of the most sought after is the Stanford Institutes of Medicine Summer Research Program, which alone received about 1,400 applications this year to fill about 70 to 75 openings. Decisions are based on academic grounds to help narrow down the number of prospective candidates — a tough task in a pool of extremely well-educated candidates.

But coordinators also recognize the need to provide opportunities for students who don’t have the chance to join accelerated science programs and express that oftentimes the most important quality of an applicant is a passion for science.

The article notes that internships gained through family and friend connections can be unevenly distributed, and  how programs like Stanford’s Raising Interest in Science and Engineering (RISE) Summer Internship Program have made the experiences more accessible. More from the piece:

“Typically those are kids with very educated parents who speak fluent English and who are comfortable poking around Stanford a little bit … or have a network and know somebody who works in a lab here. The RISE students typically just don’t have family members that can help them in that way,” [Kate Storm] says. “I think it’s important to serve all students, not just the privileged gifted students who are going to thrive and do well no matter what because they’ve got the backing of their school and parents and siblings.”

These types of opportunities are important to start curbing the racial disparities that exist in STEM occupations. Roughly 70 percent of the people in STEM occupations were Caucasian, 14 percent Asian, 6.5 percent Hispanic and 6.4 percent African American, according to an American Community Survey Report from the U.S. Census Bureau in 2011. Since 2008, Storm says about 80 percent of RISE graduates have gone on to major in math, engineering or science in college.

Researchers are also passionate about increasing the number of girls in labs since women are also largely underrepresented in STEM fields. The same 2011 U.S. Census Bureau report stated that roughly 25.8 percent of those in STEM occupations are women, compared to 45.7 percent of all jobs.

Previously: Residential learning program offers undergrads a new approach to scientific inquiry, The “transformative experience” of working in a Stanford stem-cell lab, Image of the Week: CIRM intern Brian Woo’s summer projectImage of the Week: CIRM intern Christina Bui’s summer project and Stanford’s RISE program gives high-schoolers a scientific boost
Photo by Amy

Chronic Disease, Research, Science, Stanford News, Technology

Stanford team develops nanotech-based microchip to diagnose Type 1 diabetes

Stanford team develops nanotech-based microchip to diagnose Type 1 diabetes

Dr. Brian Feldman?s M.D. hold a computer chip that he develop that will benefit diabetic patients at the Stanford School of Medicine,  on Thursday, July 4, 2014.  ( Norbert von der Groeben/ Stanford School of Medicine )

Years ago, when patients showed up at the doctor with excessive thirst, frequent urination and unexplained weight loss – in other words, the classic symptoms of diabetes mellitus – diagnosing them was usually just a matter of checking for high blood sugar. Yes, they needed to be treated for the correct form of the disease, but the two main types were found in different populations. So, in most cases, no lab test was needed to figure out whether someone had Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes; demographic factors were enough to make the distinction.

Of late, there’s been much more cross-over between the two groups. To treat patients correctly, it’s important to diagnose the right form of diabetes, but there’s a problem: The only test that does so is expensive, cumbersome and available only in hospitals.

So it’s great news that Stanford scientists are developing a new Type 1 diabetes test, described in a paper published online this week in Nature Medicine. The new nanotechnology-based microchip, which researcher Brian Feldman, MD, PhD, holds in the photo above, tests patients’ blood for the auto-antibodies that cause Type 1 diabetes. The new test is cheap, portable, and uses much less blood than the older diagnostic test. Unlike the old test, it requires no radioactive reagents and is simple enough to use in low-tech settings.

The test uses a nanotech enhancement (specifically, nano-sized islands of gold; hence the golden glow of the chip that Feldman is holding) to help detect auto-antibodies. In addition to diagnosing new patients, this technology will also enable better research into how Type 1 diabetes develops, as our press release explains:

…[P]eople who are at risk of developing Type 1 diabetes, such patients’ close relatives, also may benefit from the test because it will allow doctors to quickly and cheaply track their auto-antibody levels before they show symptoms. Because it is so inexpensive, the test may also allow the first broad screening for diabetes auto-antibodies in the population at large.

“The auto-antibodies truly are a crystal ball,” Feldman said. “Even if you don’t have [Type 1] diabetes yet, if you have one auto-antibody linked to diabetes in your blood, you are at significant risk; with multiple auto-antibodies, it’s more than 90 percent risk.”

Feldman’s team has started a biotech company to further develop the test and is seeking FDA approval for the new method. In addition, Stanford University and the researchers have filed a patent for the new technique.

Previously: A simple blood test may unearth the earliest signs of heart transplant rejection, Stanford microbiologist’s secret sauce for disease detection and One family’s story on caring for their children with type 1 diabetes
Photo by Norbert von der Groeben

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of July 6

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

It’s time for innovation in how we pay for medical schoolJoanne Conroy, MD, chief executive officer of Lahey Clinic & Medical Center in Burlington, Mass., discusses options to decrease undergraduate medical school debt. This post originally appeared on Wing of Zock.

Without exercise, Americans are growing more obese, according to Stanford researchers: Inactivity rather than overeating could be driving the surge in Americans’ obesity, according to a study by Stanford researchers that includes first author Uri Ladabaum, MD.

The behavioral consequences of overindulgence: Researchers from the Stanford Graduate School of Business have conducted a series of experiments on how overindulgence affects our pleasure in food. Their findings offer insights for both individuals that have trouble eating and drinking in moderation and those who are picky eaters.

Fewer than six degrees of separation: the small world of higher education: In this entry of the SMS Unplugged series, med student Hamsika Chandrasekar discusses the need to address diversity of undergraduate institutions in medical school.

Stanford patient on having her genome sequenced: “This is the right thing to do for our family”: Patient Julie Prillinger’s genome was among the first to be sequenced through a pilot program of the new Clinical Genomics Service at Stanford Hospital & Clinics. The pilot phase of the service is limited to specific patient groups.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Ethics, Genetics, Medicine and Society, Parenting, Pediatrics, Stanford News

Genome testing for children: What parents should consider

Genome testing for children: What parents should consider

Genome testing: Would you do it?

Okay, next question: Would you have your child’s whole genome tested?

In the recent issue of Stanford Medicine News, Louanne Hudgins, MD, chief of medical genetics and director of perinatal genetics at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, weighs in on the issue: “I strongly advise parents against whole-genome testing for their children unless performed in the context of a medical evaluation following formal counseling regarding its utility, limitations and possible unrelated findings,” she said.

In the piece, Hudgins comments on privacy and ethics considerations, and explains why what we partially know (for instance, if your child is found to have a gene predisposing him or her to a disease) can sometimes provide more cause for worry or false hope than helpful or conclusive information.

The whole piece (a short one) is worth a read.

Previously: Stanford patient on having her genome sequenced: “This is the right thing to do for our family”, Personal molecular profiling detects diseases earlier, Stanford geneticist discusses genomics and medicine in TEDMED talk and Medical practice, patents, and “custom children”: A look at the future of reproductive medicine

Medicine and Society, Science, Stanford News, Technology

Residential learning program offers undergrads a new approach to scientific inquiry

Residential learning program offers undergrads a new approach to scientific inquiry

SIMILE studentsTwenty-two Stanford freshmen spent the last school year living, studying and socializing immersed in scientific inquiry. In its inaugural year, the residential education program SIMILE: Science in the Making Integrated Learning Environment drew interest from and selected a diverse group representative of the student body, many of whom don’t intend to become physicians or scientists or even plan to major in related fields. SIMILE students take pre-major requisites including writing, rhetoric and breadth requirements focused on the historical, cultural and social contexts of science. They also complete hands-on projects, attend field trips and regularly interact with faculty and guest lecturers in the program. Housed in the all-freshman Burbank House with ITALIC (Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture), SIMILE students attend lectures and discussion sections in-house and have some shared activities with the new arts-focused residential academic program there.

A recent Stanford Report piece notes:

In the fall, Paula Findlen, [PhD,] a professor of Italian history and director of SIMILE, and Reviel Netz, a professor of classics, team-taught Inventing Science, Technology and Medicine. The class explored how those scientific fields emerged from the human desire to understand nature – empirically, mathematically and philosophically – and to control the environment.

Findlen said the program offered a “big picture view” of how human interactions have changed over the centuries, using history as the lens to understand the invention of science, technology and medicine.

“Fundamentally, SIMILE is a program about the history of knowledge,” she said.

Previously: Exploring global health through historical literatureThoughts on the arts and humanities in shaping a medical career and Intersection of arts and medicine a benefit to both, report finds
Photo by Jeremy Moffett

Cancer, Research, Science, Stanford News, Stem Cells

Radiation therapy may attract circulating cancer cells, according to new Stanford study

Radiation therapy may attract circulating cancer cells, according to new Stanford study

Localized radiation therapy for breast cancer kills cancer cells at the tumor site. But, in a cruel irony, Stanford radiation oncologist Edward Graves, PhD, and research associate Marta Vilalta, PhD, have found that the dying cells in the breast may send out a signal that recruits other cancer cells back to the site of the initial tumor. Their work was published today in Cell Reports. As Graves explained in an e-mail to me:

Cancer spreads by shedding tumor cells into the circulation, where they can travel to distant organs and form secondary lesions.  We’ve demonstrated with this study that cancer radiation therapy may actually attract these circulating tumor cells, or CTCs, back to the primary tumor, which may lead to the regrowth of the tumor after radiation therapy.

The researchers studied mouse and human breast cancer cells growing in a laboratory dish, as well as human breast cancer cells implanted into mice. They found that irradiated cells secreted a molecule called granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor, or GM-CSF. Blocking the expression of GM-CSF by the cells inhibited (but didn’t completely block) their ability to recruit other cells to the cancer site. The finding is particularly interesting, since physicians sometimes give cancer patients injections of GM-CSF to enhance the growth of infection-fighting white blood cells that can be damaged during chemotherapy. As Graves explained, “This work has important implications for clinical radiotherapy, and for the use of GM-CSF in treating neutropenia in cancer patients during therapy.”

The researchers say, however, that cancer patients shouldn’t eschew radiation therapy. Rather, the finding may help clinicians devise better ways to fight the disease – perhaps by blocking GM-CSF signaling. Graves concluded:

It should be emphasized that radiation therapy remains one of the most effective treatments for cancer. Our findings will help us to further optimize patient outcomes following this already potent therapy.

Previously: Using 3-D technology to screen for breast cancer, Blood will tell: In Stanford study, tiny bits of circulating tumor DNA betray hidden cancers and Common drug class targets breast cancer stem cells, may benefit more patients, says study

Stanford Medicine Resources: