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In the News, Pediatrics, Sleep, Stanford News, Videos

Stanford doc gives teens a crash course on the dangers of sleep deprivation

Stanford doc gives teens a crash course on the dangers of sleep deprivation

Numerous studies, including a big one published in Pediatrics earlier this year, have shown that adolescents are getting less sleep than ever before. But most teens are unlikley unaware of the dangers of sleep deprivation – and that’s something that a group of Stanford clinicians is trying to change. Rafael Pelayo, MD, with the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, and colleagues recently gave a “crash course” on sleep, and the importance of getting enough, to students at nearby Menlo-Atherton High School. ABC7 captured the story in the video above.

Previously: Talking about teens’ “great sleep recession”, With school bells ringing, parents should ensure their children are doing enough sleeping, Study shows poor sleep habits as a teenager can “stack the deck against you for obesity later in life”, What are the consequences of sleep deprivation? and Want teens to eat healthy? Make sure they get a good night’s sleep

Events, Parenting, Pediatrics, Stanford News, Videos

Pediatric health expert Alan Guttmacher outlines key issues facing children’s health today

Pediatric health expert Alan Guttmacher outlines key issues facing children's health today

The inaugural Childx conference was held here last month, and video interviews featuring keynote speakers, panelists and moderators are now on the Stanford YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of driving innovation in maternal and child health, we’ll be featuring a selection of the videos this month on Scope.

During his keynote speech at Stanford’s recent Childx conference, Alan Guttmacher, MD, director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Development, told attendees, “We need to be a society that values children.”

In the above video, Guttmacher emphasizes this point as he outlines key issues facing children’s health today. He explains that it’s the dawn of a new era in medical research with the potential to improve the lives of children throughout their life span. To make a lasting difference in children’s lives, he says, research needs to go beyond the medical approach and integrate social and environmental factors. He highlights the example of preterm birth, saying that while we’ve made strides in reducing the infant mortality rate of babies born too early, more needs to be done to understand the causes of preterm birth and prevent it.

Watch the full interview to learn more about why investing in pediatrics research can help the generations of tomorrow build a healthier future.

Previously: “It’s not just science fiction anymore”: Childx speakers talk stem cell and gene therapy, Global health and precision medicine: Highlights from day two of Stanford’s Childx conference, Innovating for kids’ health: More from first day of Stanford’s Childx, “What we’re really talking about is changing the arc of children’s lives:” Stanford’s Childx kicks off and Countdown to Childx: Q&A with pediatric health expert Alan Guttmacher

Behavioral Science, Complementary Medicine, Mental Health, Stanford News

Stanford law professor uses behavioral psychology to promote stress reduction in students

Stanford law professor uses behavioral psychology to promote stress reduction in students

6145155310_258dc36f9e_zGoing back to school inspired Stanford law professor Joseph Bankman, JD, with more than new perspectives on his legal work. Through his experience in the Palo Alto University/Stanford School of Medicine joint PsyD (doctor of psychology) program, Bankman thought of a way to connect what he was learning about behavioral psychology with what he sees everyday in his students. He started a program that offers first-year law students an emotional health seminar using cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to help them positively respond to situations that induce stress and anxiety.

Stanford News has the story, in which Bankman is quoted:

I have all these brilliant students whom I can help by giving them some useful knowledge and improving their analytical skills. But, as I came to realize over the years, if they crash and burn it will not be because they lack these necessary skills.  It will be because they lack emotional resilience to cope with the stresses and challenges of a demanding professional career.  Like millions of others, they need help with anxiety and, for some, depression.

The two-hour course includes an introduction to the principles of CBT and some simple exercises, and it has been offered on a voluntary basis for the past two years. Student response has been overwhelmingly positive: in one course, 100 percent said it should be offered again, and many reported that the benefits extended past school and into their personal lives.

In the news report, Bankman says he is observing a new focus on the emotional well-being of students in both research and  institutions, and he hopes the trend will continue.

Previously: A conversation with Scott Stossel, author of My Age of Anxiety, Benefits of mindfulness program for med students, Reframing reactions could reduce symptoms of social anxiety disorder, Stanford study shows and A closer look at depression and distress among medical students
Photo by Tulane Public Relations

In the News, Media, Science

Science enthusiasts flock to #IAmAScientistBecause and #BeyondMarieCurie on Twitter

Science enthusiasts flock to #IAmAScientistBecause and #BeyondMarieCurie on Twitter

iamascientistbecause tweet - smallRecently, a friend of mine commented that scientists “don’t use Twitter much.” The statement may have been true in the past, but as evidenced by #IAmAScientistBecause and #BeyondMarieCurie, scientists and science enthusiasts are now driving some trending topics on Twitter.

Yesterday, a story on Nature.com explained how these two popular hashtags have encouraged scientists to speak out. The first was created by the NatureCareers team in summer 2014, and the hashtag’s popularity suddenly increased earlier this week after Jon Tennant (@Protohedgehog), a graduate student studying paleontology at Imperial College London, shared the hashtag with his 6,000 some followers on Twitter. By Tuesday, the hashtag was trending on Twitter.

The resulting flood of tweets rallied scientists like epidemiologist Chelsea Polis, PhD, (@cbpolis) who told Nature.com she spent a day following the IAmAScientistBecause Twitter campaign online. “Despite all of the negatives, there’s so much that’s beautiful about science,” Polis said.

Meanwhile, a separate empowering conversation began when science editor Melissa Vaught (@biochembelle) tweeted about Rachel Swaby’s (@rachelswaby) Wired.com story on scientific achievements made by women. In her story, Swaby states that one woman tends to dominate conversations of female scientists and that we need to open our eyes to the many contributions other female scientists have made, and are making, to science:

Today if you ask someone to name a woman scientist, the first and only name they’ll offer is Marie Curie. It’s one of the biggest obstacles to better representation of women in science and technology, and it’s time to cut it out. Stop talking about Marie Curie; she wouldn’t have wanted things this way.

Vaught told Nature.com that she created #BeyondMarieCurie as a response to Swaby’s article because “we need diverse stories of women in science.”

As I scrolled through the hundreds of Tweets aggregated by the two hashtags one post in particular stood out. As shown above, chemist Carina Jensen, PhD, (@Chem_Monkey) tweeted, “IAmAScientistBecause a professor said women don’t do well in Chemistry. I proved him wrong.” For me, this unites the sentiments of the two hashtags beautifully.

Previously: The power of social media: How one man uses it to help amputees get prostheticsA day in the lab: Stanford scientists share their stories, what fuels their workChipping away at stereotypes about older women and science, one story at a timeWhat’s holding women in the sciences back? and Women in science: A rare breed

Events, Global Health, History, Pediatrics, Surgery, Transplants

From Costa Rica to Stanford: Pediatric liver transplant surgeon shares his story

From Costa Rica to Stanford: Pediatric liver transplant surgeon shares his story

Esquivel - croppedThese days, Carlos Esquivel, MD, PhD, is best known as one of the top pediatric liver transplant surgeons. But just a few decades ago, he worked as a generalist physician in an ill-equipped Costa Rican village located across from a river teeming with man-sized crocodiles.

Esquivel told a gripping tale of his journey from his native Costa Rica to Stanford during a recent Café Scientifque presentation. He described how he spent only a year in remote San Vito before traveling to the United States and joining the lab of innovative surgeon F.W. Blaisdell, MD, who took Esquivel under his wing and treated him like a son. On to Sweden, where Esquivel earned his post-doctorate degree, before mastering his transplantation skills with Thomas Starzl, MD, PhD, who is known as the “father of trasnplantation” and conducted the first human liver transplant in 1963.

Back then, transplant surgeons wore knee-high fishing waders to perform transplantations — they were that messy, Esquivel said. And few dared to do liver transplants in children. Fast-forward to today: Transplant surgeries are shorter, much less bloody, and much more survivable thanks to the improvements in technology and immunosuppressant drugs. Last year, the team at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford tallied a 100 percent one-year survival rate, Esquivel told the audience.

Now, the primary problem is the shortage of organs. More than 120,000 people in the United States are waiting for a new organ. Kidneys are most in-demand, but thousands of people are also waiting for new livers. And like kidneys, livers can be taken from living donors, Esquivel said. Sometimes, an adult liver can even be split in two, saving the lives of another adult and a child.

Livers can regenerate, making it an ideal organ to donate. However, the donation surgery can cause complications and donation is a choice that potential donors — and their doctors — should consider carefully, Esquivel said.

Esquivel said surgeries are physically taxing, but also take a great deal of mental preparation. Before surgeries, he said he runs through all the scenarios, trying to prepare for every possibility.

To raise awareness about organ donation, Esquivel, an avid cyclist, completed an across-the-county bicycle race with a former transplant patient. And he has high hopes for the future. Once, transplanted livers only lasted 12 to 15 years, but today, some livers last as long as 30 years, Esquivel said.

Previously: How mentorship shaped a Stanford surgeon’s 30 years of liver transplants, Raising awareness about rare diseases and Record number of organ transplants saves five lives in a day
Photo courtesy of Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health/ Toni Gauthier

Mental Health, Neuroscience, Rural Health

Seven ways laughter can improve your well-being

Seven ways laughter can improve your well-being

3336353424_df38db0c8a_zEveryone enjoys a good laugh, but who actually makes time for it in their lives? Sure, we like hearing a funny joke, talking to people with a good sense of humor and watching comedies. But few of us take our laughs seriously (no pun intended!) nor do we make a concerted effort to laugh more. But we should! The science of laughter – though still preliminary – suggests that it has tremendous benefits for our health and psychological well-being.

Laughter can improve your relationships. According to a recent study led by research assistant Alan Gray of University College London, the act of laughing can make you more open to new people and can help you build relationships.

Laughter may also boost memory and lower stress. A study by researchers at Loma Linda University found that laughter can sharpen your ability to remember things while also reducing the stress hormone, cortisol, especially in older people.

Laughter may make you more resilient. Ever had nervous laughter in an awkward or difficult situation? That’s because laughter may help you regulate your emotions in the face of challenge, according to a study led by Yale psychologist Erica J. Boothby, PhD.

Laughter can improve your health. A study of diabetic patients by Lee S. Berk, PhD, and Stanley A. Tan, MD, of Loma Linda University found that laughing can lower stress and inflammation and increase good cholesterol. Ever found yourself laughing while telling a joke or funny story? Maybe you were anticipating the ending and laughed your way through the end of the joke? Another study by Berk and Tan suggests that just anticipating a funny event boosted immune function while decreasing stress-related hormones.

Laughter can make you a better learner. When we are trying to learn something new, we usually are pretty serious, but research by Mark Shatz, PhD, and Frank LoSchiavo, PhD, of Ohio University show that a good laugh while learning new material will help you engage with it more!

Laughter can make you more attractive.  Another recent study by Shatz and LoSchiavo shows that humor and playfulness are highly valued traits in potential romantic partners.

Laughter can help you make the world a better place. Why? It’s contagious. At least on the level of the brain, according to research by Sophie Scott, PhD, of University College London.

Emma Seppala, PhD, is associate director of Stanford’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education and a research psychologist at the School of Medicine. She is also a certified yoga, pilates, breath work and meditation instructor. A version of this piece originally appeared on Psychology Today.
Photo by Arnet Gill

Biomed Bites, Imaging, Neuroscience, Research, Technology, Videos

Peering under the hood – of the brain

Peering under the hood - of the brain

Welcome to Biomed Bites, a weekly feature that introduces readers to some of Stanford’s most innovative researchers.

Fixing a broken brain is much like fixing a malfunctioning car, misbehaving computer or most anything else that isn’t working as it should.

“Whenever we’re trying to fix something that’s broken, it can be very helpful indeed to understand how that thing works,” says Stephen Smith, PhD, in the video above. “I believe the brain does not pose an exception to this rule.”

That’s why Smith, a professor of molecular and cellular biology, emeritus, has spent his career developing better ways to understand — and see — the brain.

Currently, he’s most excited about a technique called array tomography that allows researchers to observe the brain’s wiring, the linkages between neurons, and gain a better understanding of how it functions.

That technique, as well as others, offers real hope for fixing brains broken by autism, Alzheimer’s disease or other brain disorders. Here’s Smith:

I think the progress we’re making today in understanding basic brain mechanisms is likely to help us greatly as we develop new drugs that can help lessen or reverse the wide array of neurodegenerative or neurodevelopmental or injury-related disorders of the brain.

Learn more about Stanford Medicine’s Biomedical Innovation Initiative and about other faculty leaders who are driving biomedical innovation here.

Previously: Visualizing the brain as a Universe of synapses, Examining the potential of creating new synapses in old or damaged brains and Fantastic voyage: Stanford researcher offers a virtual flight through the brain

In the News, Medicine and Literature, NIH, Research, Science

The value of exploring jellyfish eyes: Scientist-penned book supports “curiosity-driven” research

The value of exploring jellyfish eyes: Scientist-penned book supports "curiosity-driven" research

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As an academic, I often encounter variations of the question “And so… what are you going to do with that?” In other words, why should anyone care about insights, experiments, and questions that serve no obvious functional purpose?

A PNAS release published earlier this week spotlights a novel that tackles just this issue. Joram Piatigorsky, PhD, a retired scientist from the NIH’s National Eye Institute who now devotes his time to his passion for art and literature, went through the arduous process of writing and publishing a novel because he sees literature as an important way to make statements about society. And the statement that he wants to get across loud and clear is that basic research matters, and needs to be funded.

The book, called Jellyfish Have Eyes, is set in the near future and follows a scientist who gets into serious legal and professional trouble because he departs from research that is clearly related to a human disease in favor of researching jellyfish, and in a mix-up uses government funding to do so. Piatigorsky laments how in today’s tight funding environment, students who would otherwise pursue basic questions – such as whether jellyfish have eyes – are forced to do more routine, translational research that doesn’t make use of their creativity.

And when creativity gets stymied, important breakthroughs are simply missed. The release quotes the book’s main character, who is modeled after Piatigorsky:

I justify my research on delving into the mysteries of Nature because generally the experiments yield new insights that benefit people. There’s penicillin, recombinant DNA, genetic engineering… Bacteria provided the first models for gene regulation, which set the stage for gene therapy. Sea slugs—snails without shells—revealed mysteries of memory. Birds have taught us that it’s possible to rest half the brain at a time. Think how useful it would be if we could be asleep and active at the same time.

Piatigorsky worries about the current research climate, where “anti-science politicians” force cuts to basic research and pundits and the public insist on knowing what “cure” a research project aims to find, says the release. But Piatigorsky is optimistic about the power of storytelling: “I have a very strong feeling that science is not a collection of facts. You have to make the facts into a story of communication… The narrative aspect of science is very compelling.”

And, in case you were wondering, jellyfish do have eyes – “magnificent eyes. It depends on the species. They have lenses, corneas, retinas,” says Piatigorsky in the release. No one knows what they can see or how vision might affect their behavior, but such impractical questions might lead to the next breakthrough. In the meantime, they promote curiosity and wonder about our world.

Previously: Research in medical school: the need to align incentives with value, Can science journals have beautiful prose? and Science is like an ongoing mystery novel, says Stanford neurobiologist Carla Shatz
Photo by Lassi Kurkijarvi

Big data, Imaging, Neuroscience, Research, Science, Stanford News, Technology, Videos

All data – big and small – informs large-scale neuroscience project

All data - big and small - informs large-scale neuroscience project

The thought of gaining access to data from thousands of brains would make most neuroscientists salivate. But now, a team of Stanford and Oxford researchers is able to do just that. Led by Jennifer McNab, PhD, assistant professor of radiology, the group compares magnetic resonance images from as many as 100,000 people with in-depth 3-D scans developed using CLARITY, a technique developed at Stanford that visualizes intact tissue.

“This is a tremendous resource in terms of scientists being able to look and see who develops a particular disease and who does not and why that may be,” McNab said in the video above.

Her team — which includes Karl Deisseroth, MD, PhD; Michael Zeineh, MD, PhD and Michael Greicius, MD, MpH — is tapping the U.K. Biobank, which has about 500,000 participants. It also uses data from the NIH Human Connectome Project, which could include up to 1,200 MRI images. The project received a 2014 Big Data for Human Health Seed Grant and is part of Stanford Medicine’s Biomedical Data Science Initiative (BDSI), which strives to make powerful transformations in human health and scientific discovery by fostering innovative collaborations among medical researchers, computer scientists, statisticians and physicians.

The project uses two distinct types of “big data.” The large databases with hundreds of entries clearly falls under this umbrella, but even one dataset from CLARITY, which produces extremely high-resolution images, produces big data, she said.

The project may make it possible to glean more diagnostic information from MRIs, McNab said. “Then we can hopefully develop early biomarkers of disease that will ultimately help to guide treatment plans and preventative measures,” she said.

This project offers just a glimpse at the potential of data science. For more on important work being done in this area, mark your calendars for Stanford’s Big Data in Biomedicine conference May 20-22. More information is available here.

Previously: Registration for the Big Data in Biomedicine Conference now open, How CLARITY offers an unprecedented 3-D view of the brain’s neural structure and Euan Ashley discusses harnessing big data to drive innovation for a healthier world

Events, Medicine X, Patient Care, Stanford News, Technology, Videos

Medicine X conference to focus on the theme of “Great eXpectations”

Medicine X conference to focus on the theme of "Great eXpectations"

Known for its powerful patient stories and candid on-stage conversations, the Medicine X conference returns to campus on Sept. 25-27. This year’s program will focus on the theme “Great eXpectations” and explore five key areas, including the challenges associated with accessing health care as you age, the misconceptions and misperceptions faced by patients and population health from the patient perspective.

In a press release about the upcoming conference, Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine, noted, “The brightest minds and the most innovative thinking converge at Stanford Medicine X — the intersection of medicine and technology… This is one of the most thought-provoking and important events in health care today and will help pave the way for how technology enables patient-centered and patient-driven care in the years to come.”

During the three-day event, Peter Bach, MD, director of the Center for Health Policy and Outcomes at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, will deliver a keynote address. Bach is a physician and health-policy expert whose research focuses on the cost and value of anti-cancer drugs. An accomplished writer, he has authored numerous op-eds on health care, but is perhaps most well-known for his New York Magazine essay “The Day I Started Lying to Ruth” about losing his wife to cancer. Other confirmed speakers include cellist and composer Zoë Keating; Robert Pearl, MD, executive director and CEO of The Permanente Medical Group; and 91-year-old IDEO designer Barbara Beskind.

Registration for Medicine X is now open. More details about the program can be found on the Medicine X website.

More news about the conference is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Registration now open for the inaugural Stanford Medicine X|ED conference, Stanford Medicine X: From an “annual meeting to a global movement” and A doctor recounts his wife’s battle with cancer: “My knowledge was too clear-eyed”

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