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In the News, Mental Health, Patient Care

Imagining voices: A new movement is using drug-free ways to treat auditory hallucinations

Imagining voices: A new movement is using drug-free ways to treat auditory hallucinations

Artistic_view_of_how_the_world_feels_like_with_schizophrenia_-_journal.pmed.0020146.g001The idea of hearing voices, or auditory hallucinations, is an experience that frightens many of us. It can be seen as a sign that you are no longer in control of your mind. Auditory hallucinations are also a symptom of schizophrenia, and those with the disease often hear voices which are hostile, mean and disturbing. But in Europe, a small band of clinicians, led by the Dutch psychiatrist and president of Intervoice, Marius Romme, MD, PhD, is exploring new ways to treat the problem of hearing distressing voices. A recent interview with one of Romme’s colleagues, Dirk Corstens, MD, and two of his patients, was featured in The Atlantic.

Stanford anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann, PhD, has worked extensively with people who hear voices, and a recent study she conducted compared the experiences of psychotic patients with auditory hallucinations living in three very different locales – San Mateo, California; Chennai India; and Accra, Ghana. Her team found that the voices of Indian and Ghanaian patients were more likely to be playful and benign, whereas those of U.S. patients were on average more threatening.

When Luhrmann took time to talk with me to discuss the implications of her research and the new approach, which calls itself the Hearing Voices movement, she noted early on that although the treatments espoused by the new movement won’t work for everyone, “The Hearing Voices approach is very important and has an important kernel to it.”

Some of what the group advocates is controversial. “They often reject the idea of schizophrenia, are hesitant about medication, and have a model of hearing voices that identifies sexual trauma as the most important cause of hearing voices,” she says. But a growing body of scientific evidence shows that it may be useful to teach people to interact with their voices.

The Hearing Voices movement, says Luhrmann, advocates seeing the voices as meaningful, treats them as people, respects the voices and encourages patients to interact with them with the help of a trained clinician. One of the patients featured in The Atlantic piece described how he learned to work with the voices he heard:

[Dr. Corstens and I] started to work with each other five years ago, or more. I was around 20 years old. It took about two years of work to actually figure out what the relationships were, what the triggers for the voices were, and what feelings are coupled to these voices. Once you start to learn to express yourself and work out these problems on your own, the voices don’t have to act out their part. Now, when I hear voices, I know what triggered them. I ask, “What is happening with me? What am I neglecting in my own emotions?” Does that make sense?

Luhrmann says that while more research needs to be done, it seems that some patients appear to benefit and the voices they hear diminish, or at least become less aggressive and intrusive. But she cautions that the method may not be appropriate for all patients. “I think it’s important to remember that schizophrenia is a difficult heterogeneous experience,” she says. “It’s pretty clear, even at this early point, that these new techniques don’t work for everyone.” At the same time, she points out, research on related practices like cognitive behavioral therapy has been shown to ease the severity of the voice-hearing experience.

The new movement is mostly centered in European countries at the moment, but Luhrmann notes that it’s growing fast in a grassroots kind of way, somewhat in the way Alcoholics Anonymous grew in the last century. She predicts that some of the approaches used by the group will probably be used among patients with schizophrenia here in the U.S. in the next decade.

Previously: The link between mental-health conditions and cardiovascular diseaseNew thinking on schizophrenia, it’s the mind, body and social experience and Study shows meditation may alter areas of the brain associated with psychiatric disorders
Image by Craig Finn

Chronic Disease, Imaging, Immunology, Neuroscience, Research, Stanford News

Patients’ reaction to ME/CFS coverage in Stanford Medicine magazine

Patients' reaction to ME/CFS coverage in Stanford Medicine magazine

me-cfs-brain-zeineh

In the last few weeks, Stanford published two articles on chronic fatigue syndrome, a.k.a. myalgic encephalomyelitis, and the outpouring of positive feedback from ME/CFS patients has been tremendous. In my long-form Stanford Medicine story and video, I describe a young woman’s seven-year battle with the disease and the groundbreaking research being done by her physician, José Montoya, MD, and immunologist Mark Davis, PhD, to identify the biomarkers and root causes of ME/CFS. My colleague Bruce Goldman followed up with an elegantly written article describing the distinct differences between the brains of ME/CFS patients with those of healthy people, in a newly released study from this same research team.

While our primary job as medical science writers is to explain new research accurately, it’s a bonus to know that we captured the patient experience in a compassionate way, and that we have in some way eased their suffering with hope.

Here is a sampling of a few of these letters from around the world:

From British Columbia, Canada:
Thank you for an article that is very well done. I will be printing it for my MD and forwarding it to family and a few close friends because it captures this devastating illness so well. I will keep a copy for myself to remind me (on those dark days) that Dr. Montoya is in my corner.

From Sweden:
I would like to thank you for your very informative and interesting article! This kind of information of what research is going on at Stanford, etc., is very important for us patients with ME all over the world! There is a lot of disinformation coming out about this disease and I therefore very much appreciate your article and especially Dr. Montoya’s passionate engagement with this disease.

From Cali, Colombia:
Here in Cali, Colombia, the city of birth of Dr. Montoya, I feel very happy reading your excellent article, and learning the marvelous and difficult investigation performed by these brilliant scientists. I was moved to tears. Thank you.

From the San Francisco Bay Area:
I want to thank you very much for the powerful piece you wrote about ME/CFS. You tell the story in a very engaging way, which is so compelling. It’s not the usual doom/gloom/dark room story which my daughter and I have encountered frequently in what people write about ME/CFS. Family and friends with whom I have shared the article are appreciative of your writing so descriptively and articulately about all aspects of ME/CFS: the science, the inequity of research funding, the personal experience of a patient, the work of Drs. Montoya/Mark Davis/Holden Maecker.

From India:
Today I have gone through your article about Erin’s story. How she recovered from CFS had given me a ray of hope as I am also suffering from such an ailment for the last 6-8 years.

From Atlanta, Georgia:
I just read your beautifully written article on Immune System Disruption. First soccer caught my eye, then “swimming in the primordial soup of creative disruption” locked me in. I read every word … and I am going to spend the rest of the night in Atlanta copying [my internal medicine doctor] on the article.

From Australia:
Just wanted to thank you for your excellent article. It could really make a difference in raising awareness and I appreciate the quality of your writing. I have suffered from CFS/ME for many years in Australia and find the research project and your understanding very encouraging.

From the blogosphere:
I just wanted to thank you for taking the time to write such an in-depth, accurate article on our oft-ignored illness. Dr. Montoya is a hero within the ME/CFS community, but I didn’t know about the others at Stanford also working on ME/CFS — that gives me some hope for a better future! I plan to share your article on my ME/CFS blog and in several Facebook groups for ME/CFS that I belong to.

Previously: Some headway on chronic fatigue syndrome: Brain abnormalities pinpointedUnbroken: A chronic-fatigue patient’s long road to recovery, Deciphering the puzzle of chronic-fatigue syndrome and Stanford Medicine magazine traverses the immune system
Image, showing white matter differences between a ME/CFS patient sample an a healthy control, by Michael Zeineh/Stanford

Autism, Events, Stanford News

A conversation with autism activist and animal behavior expert Temple Grandin

A conversation with autism activist and animal behavior expert Temple Grandin

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In the inspiring film, “Temple Grandin,” we learn the remarkable story of a woman born with autism who, as a young child, communicates through screaming and humming, and is given to fist-pumping outbursts of frustration. But Grandin, played brilliantly in the film by Claire Danes, has a rare affinity with animals and a keen sense of their needs. She ultimately becomes a renowned expert in animal behavior, a university professor and a consultant to major U.S. companies.

Grandin, PhD, one of the world’s most famous people with autism, will visit Stanford’s medical school next Wednesday to deliver a talk entitled, “Animals Make us Human.” In anticipation of her presentation, we asked her to answer five questions about the link between autism and animals. Her answers – like this one – offer a window into the world of autism, while providing a sense of Grandin’s character and thought process:

Animal cognition has similarities to autism cognition. Animals are very aware of small, sensory details in the environment. People on the autism spectrum excel at work involving details. SAP, a large computer company, is hiring people on the mild end of the autism spectrum to debug and correct computer programs.

Concepts are formed from specific examples. To train a dog to always obey the “sit” command, it must be taught in many different locations. If all the dog’s training is done in the living room, the dog may only obey the commands in the living room. To teach a child with autism about road safety, he needs to be taught in many different locations. These similarities between animals and autism apply only to cognition. They do not apply to the emotions. Animals are highly social and emotional creatures.

Her presentation begins at noon in the Clark Center on the medical school campus and will be followed by a book signing at the bookstore at the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge. The talk, sponsored by Stanford’s Department of Comparative Medicine, is free and open to the public. If you’re local and able to attend, I would get there early, as I believe this is going to be one very popular event.

Photo by Rosalie Winard

Biomed Bites, Immunology, Infectious Disease, Research, Stanford News

Figuring out a parasite’s secrets – insights from studying Toxoplasma gondii

Figuring out a parasite's secrets - insights from studying Toxoplasma gondii

Welcome to Biomed Bites, a weekly feature that highlights some of Stanford’s most innovative research and introduces Scope readers to innovators in a variety of disciplines. 

You’ve probably heard that pregnant women shouldn’t get near the litter box. The reason is that many kitties carry a parasite called Toxoplasma gondii, which is transmitted through their feces. The parasite infects about 2 billion people worldwide, according to Stanford microbiologist John Boothroyd, PhD.

Boothroyd, who also serves as the associate vice provost for graduate education, directs a lab that has uncovered some of the basic biology of this single-celled protozoan parasite. Here’s Boothroyd in the video above:

Most of the time, this causes no significant disease, very few symptoms and probably something that most of these people will never know they were infected with. Occasionally, however, this parasite can cause devastating disease. It can affect the brain of the unborn child, it can cause severe neurological problems, it can even kill the developing fetus.

Toxoplasmosis, or infection with the parasite, can also cause serious complications in immunocompromised individuals. Boothroyd said he was drawn to the study of the T. gondii because it is clinically significant — he has the opportunity to help millions of people: “I wanted something where I felt the work we were doing was worth the many, many hours that I and the people I worked with put in to the daily effort.” T. gondii is also related to the Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria and some of the work from Boothroyd’s lab has been translated into insights into malaria.

Boothroyd’s team also identified the T. gondii protein that triggers the immune response in humans. With that knowledge, the investigators were able to insert the gene coding for that protein into yeast, letting the yeast produce the protein, “instead of having to grow the parasite in literally hundreds of thousands of mice a year and then killing those mice to get the parasite,” Boothroyd said. He went on to explain:

The situation in which Toxoplasma presents the most significant problem for the doctor and for the patient is in the pregnant woman. The challenge becomes first, is she infected, and if so, has the parasite crossed the placenta and reached the fetus. And third, what is the consequence of the infection in the fetus? All three of those we have addressed through our work.

Although much about the parasitic diseases remains unknown, Boothroyd is glad he picked T. gondii to focus on: “I think we’ve been able to do some real good with this work.”

Learn more about Stanford Medicine’s Biomedical Innovation Initiative and about other faculty leaders who are driving biomedical innovation here.

Previously: Stanford microbiologist’s secret sauce for disease detection, Cat guts, car crashes and warp-speed Toxoplasma infections and Patrick House discusses Toxoplasma gondii, parasitic mind control and zombies

Global Health, Immunology, Pregnancy, Public Health, Stanford News, Technology

Stanford-developed smart phone blood-testing device wins international award

Stanford-developed smart phone blood-testing device wins international award

When I worked as an epidemiologist, one of my jobs was with a program that prevented perinatal hepatitis B infections. That’s when a woman with a chronic hepatitis B infection passes it on to her baby. Babies are more likely than almost any other group to develop chronic infections that can cause them years of health problems and will most likely cut their lives short.

In the U.S., most states have comprehensive testing programs to detect pregnant women with infections and strict protocols that require delivery hospitals to treat babies born to them with vaccination and antibodies to prevent infection with the virus. But a program like this requires a huge administrative and laboratory investment – and in many poverty-stricken parts of the world, this simply isn’t possible. In fact, in California, the vast majority of cases identified by the prenatal testing program are women who were born outside the United States, including many from Asia.

So when I heard the recent news that a team of four Stanford graduate students had won the Nokia Sensing XCHALLENGE, an international competition to for diagnostic devices, for a mobile test that could detect hepatitis B infections, I was pretty impressed and curious about how it could be implemented in those places. The competition is run by XPrize, the same group that has run several competitions for space exploration, and others for super-fuel efficient vehicles and ocean clean-up efforts.

The mobile version of the winning test was one of five awarded top prizes among 90 entrants. It was developed by engineering PhD candidates Daniel Bechstein, Jung-Rok Lee, Joohong Choi and Adi W. Gani, building on work previously done by Stanford professor of materials science and engineering Shan Wang, PhD, and Stanford immunologist  Paul Utz, MD. The device works because magnetic nanoparticles are grafted onto two biological markers: the hepatitis B virus and the antibody that our bodies make in response to the virus. Current tests for hepatitis B requires a full laboratory facility. A Stanford press release describes the device:

The students used a diagnostic strip that takes a finger prick of blood. The patient’s blood flows into a tiny chamber where it mixes with magnetic nanoparticles to form magnetically tagged biomarkers.

The test strip is inserted into a small magnetic detector… The smartphone is plugged into the detector, and its microprocessor helps to perform the test. It takes only a few minutes.

If the test finds the hepatitis B antigen in the blood, the patient is infected and needs treatment. For a newborn with an infected mother, the child needs both vaccination and antibody therapy.

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Aging, Neuroscience, Research

Being bilingual “provides the brain built-in exercise”

Being bilingual "provides the brain built-in exercise"

Spanish_booksWith less than two months left in 2014, many of us will soon begin the annual ritual of selecting our New Year’s resolutions. Those who are looking to boost their brain power may want to consider learning a second language in 2015: Research published today in the journal Brain and Language shows that being bilingual makes the brain more efficient at processing information.

In the study, researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology to examine participants’ brains as they performed language comprehension tests. For example, researchers would say the word “cloud” to individuals while showing them four pictures, including one of a cloud and others of similar-sounding objects, like a clown. To complete the exercise, participants had to recognize the correct photo and ignore the irrelevant images. According to a release, study results showed:

The bilingual speakers were better at filtering out the competing words because their brains are used to controlling two languages and inhibiting the irrelevant words, the researchers found.

The fMRI scans showed that “monolinguals had more activation in the inhibitory control regions than bilinguals; they had to work much harder to perform the task,” [said lead author Viorica Marian, PhD.]

“Inhibitory control is a hallmark of cognition,” said Marian. “Whether we’re driving or performing surgery, it’s important to focus on what really matters and ignore what doesn’t.”

The fact that bilinguals are constantly practicing inhibitory control could also help explain why bilingualism appears to offer a protective advantage against Alzheimer’s and dementia, said Marian.

“That’s the exciting part,” she said. “Using another language provides the brain built-in exercise. You don’t have to go out of your way to do a puzzle because the brain is already constantly juggling two languages.”

The findings add to the growing body of scientific evidence showing that being bilingual can have profound impacts on your brain.

Previously: Study shows bilingualism may enhance attention and working memory and ¿Habla Español? How bilingualism may delay the onset of Alzheimer’s symptoms
Photo by Megan Morris

Mental Health, Public Health, Research

Survey shows nearly a quarter of U.S. workers have been diagnosed with depression in their lifetime

Survey shows nearly a quarter of U.S. workers have been diagnosed with depression in their lifetime

4369627924_ccd7f6f7ff_zDepression is a major contributor to absenteeism, reduced productivity and disability among adults in the United States. Now results from a survey examining the societal and economic burden of depression in the workplace show that almost a quarter of employees have been diagnosed with depression in their lifetime and that two in five patients have missed work, for an average of 10 day per year, because of it.

The findings underscore the importance of decreasing the stigma associated with mental-health conditions in the workplace and providing workers with support services and resources. According to a release, additional results also showed:

…64 percent of survey participants reported cognitive-related challenges, as defined by difficulty concentrating, indecisiveness and/or forgetfulness, have the most impact on their ability to perform tasks at work as normal. Presenteeism (being at work, but not engaged/productive) has been found to be exacerbated by these challenges related to thinking on the job.

Despite how depression is affecting our workforce, 58 percent of employees surveyed who have been diagnosed with depression indicate they had not told their employer of their disease. In addition, 49 percent felt telling their employer would put their job a risk and, given the economic climate, 24 percent felt it was too risky to share their diagnosis with their employer.

These figures directly contribute to the estimated $100 billion annually spent on depression costs by U.S. employers including $44 billion a year in lost productivity alone.

The survey was commissioned by Ohio-based Employers Health and conducted by market research company Ipsos MORI. Questions were asked via an online panel of 1,000 adults, aged 16-64, who have been workers or managers within the last year. Responses were weighted to ensure the sample was representative of this profile. Funding was provided by international pharmaceutical company H. Lundbeck A/S.

Previously: Anxiety shown to be important risk factor for workplace absence, Research shows working out may benefit work life and How work stress affects wellness, health-care costs
Photo by Ryan Hyde

Medical Education, Patient Care, SMS Unplugged

Dreaming vs. doing: How my definition of compassion changed during medical school

Dreaming vs. doing: How my definition of compassion changed during medical school

SMS (“Stanford Medical School”) Unplugged was recently launched as a forum for students to chronicle their experiences in medical school. The student-penned entries appear on Scope once a week; the entire blog series can be found in the SMS Unplugged category.

dreamingI woke up gasping for breath. My patients had died, and I was dying with them. Gradually, my mind unclouded and I realized that it had been a dream, but that realization didn’t soothe my worries. I lay in bed wide awake, anxious. I was picturing the woman who couldn’t speak due to a stroke, who squeezed my hand and raised her eyebrows urgently, asking me for something I couldn’t identify. Then I was remembering the very sick elderly man whose wife brought homemade soup to the hospital every day, and who always had a warm smile and a flurry of gratitude in Mandarin for anyone who entered his room. Their faces swam through my mind for a long time before I returned to sleep.

I was in the midst of my first clinical rotation. After two years focusing on the basic science of medicine, finally caring for actual patients was exhilarating and all-consuming. Even after long days in the hospital obsessing over what else I could do for my patients, I would talk about my clinical experiences on the phone with my mom, on runs with my friends, and over dinner with my husband. I lived and breathed my new role so completely that in my dreams, my patients’ deaths were synonymous with my own.

Now, two years later, I still love my days spent caring for patients in the hospital and clinic, but I don’t dream about my patients anymore. I rarely talk about my work over dinner. This wasn’t a purposeful change, and sometimes I wonder if it means I care less than I once did. I worry that I am Exhibit A for the predictable erosion of empathy that we’re all told to expect by the time we graduate from medical school.

In my more self-forgiving moments, I tell myself this change in how I experience patient care means that I’m learning to compartmentalize my experiences to survive the many emotionally demanding years ahead of me in the medical profession. Based on what I hear in the periodic group reflection sessions that we have in medical school, many students, as well as senior physicians,  agree that this kind of compartmentalizing is the key to avoiding burnout. After all, being completely present for the patient sitting in the room with me means learning to put aside other concerns – including thoughts about my other patients. The same goes for my ability to be present in the rest of my life as a wife, mother, or friend. However, in spite of all this, there is still a part of me that wonders if my growing ability to mentally put my patients’ problems aside will translate into a decline in empathy and passion for my work. After all, I didn’t come to medical school just to survive it – I came to medical school because I believed caring for patients was my calling. What does it say about me that I can so easily leave that passion at the door of the hospital?

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Events, In the News, Research, Science, Stanford News

Breaking through scientific barriers: Stanford hosts 2015 Breakthrough Prize winners

Breaking through scientific barriers: Stanford hosts 2015 Breakthrough Prize winners

6018618935_38997291a8_zYoung scientists, I have good news: Nearly all of the 2015 winners of the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences pledged to devote at least some of their new-found riches to education programs that encourage budding scientists. No details yet, as the prizes were less than a day old when the researchers announced their plans at the Breakthrough Prize Life Sciences Symposium hosted by Stanford  yesterday.

“The Breakthrough Prize winners have done such amazing things,” said Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine. Minor lauded the  founders of the award, Silicon Valley luminaries Sergey Brin and Anne Wojcicki, Jack Ma and Cathy Zhang, Yuri and Julia Milner, and Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan. “They have put together this wonderful way of rewarding and awarding scientists for the work they are doing. It’s a real privilege for us at Stanford to host the symposium.”

The six scientists, who each won a $3 million award, fielded questions and let the audience in on a secret: the path toward scientific success wasn’t always easy.

“I would have never, ever in a million years have predicted I would have been sitting up here,” said C. David Allis, PhD, a professor at The Rockefeller University who was honored for his discoveries in chromatin biology, or the study of the proteins associated with DNA. Chromatin was once thought to be useless and Allis said he received plenty of criticism about his research focus.

Jennifer Doudna, PhD, a professor of molecular and cell biology and chemistry at UC Berkeley, said she didn’t know any scientists growing up in Hawaii. It wasn’t until a cancer researcher visited her high school, giving Doudna her first glimpse at her future career. Doudna, who is also affiliated with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, won along with microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier, PhD, for their work on genome editing. Charpentier leads the department of regulation in infection biology at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research in Germany.

Gary Ruvkun, PhD, said that although he’s a professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts General Hospital, he still hasn’t mastered the art of mentoring. “I’ve had people in my lab refer to me as the least grown up,” he said.  Ruvkun was recognized — along with molecular biologist Victor Ambros, PhD, of the University of Massachusetts Medical School — for their work on microRNAs, small pieces of RNA that regulate gene expression.

All of the winners thanked their family, mentors, colleagues, but Alim Louis Benabid, MD, PhD, thanked his patients as well. Benabid, board chairman of the Clinatec Institute in France, said many patients are embarrassed when their doctor asks them to take off their clothes. His patients let him stick his fingers in their brains, he joked. Benabid was honored for demonstrating that deep brain stimulation can alleviate some symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

In the full-day symposium, several former Breakthrough Prize winners spoke, and Bay Area graduate students and postdocs hosted a poster session.

Previously: Are big-money science prizes a good thing?, Funding basic science leads to clinical discoveries, eventually and Why basic research is the venture capital of the biomedical world
Photo by Petras Gagilas

Addiction, Behavioral Science, In the News, Mental Health, Research, Stanford News

Veterans helping veterans: The buddy system

Veterans helping veterans: The buddy system

image.img.320.highI interviewed Army specialist Jayson Early by phone over the summer, shortly after he completed an in-patient program for PTSD at the Veterans Affairs hospital in Menlo Park. This was for a Stanford Medicine magazine story I was researching about a pilot project to help get much needed mental-health services to the recently returned waves of Afghanistan and Iraqi vets. What struck me most after talking with Early was just how clueless he had been, first as a teenaged-recruit, then as a young veteran, about the fact that going to war could cause mental wounds.

As the mother of a 17-year-old boy, though, I completely understood: Early just wanted to serve his country. He requested to be sent to war. In 2008, he got his wish and was deployed to Iraq just a year after exchanging his high-school baseball uniform for military fatigues. His first field assignment, an innocuous-sounding public affairs errand to photograph a burned out truck at an Iraqi police station, would be the first of many that left him with permanent scars:

“There were body parts, coagulated blood, hair all over,” [Early] says, pausing. “I just wasn’t expecting it.” An Iraqi family had been executed in the vehicle, presumably by insurgents. Early had gone through intense military training to prepare for moments like these. He blocked any emotions. He followed orders, clicked the camera and moved on. It wasn’t until years later that he realized just how permanently those images, and many more like them, had burned into his brain.

Stanford psychiatrist Shaili Jain, MD, interviewed in a podcast about her work with PTSD and veterans, had told me about a new pilot project that connects veterans with other veterans as a unique way to bridge what she called a “treatment gap” – the difficulty of getting mental-health services to the veterans that need them. My article – which is a timely read, given that today is Veterans Day – tells the story of Early’s connection with one of the veteran’s hired through this project, Erik Ontiveros, who went through treatment for addictions and PTSD himself, and just why it’s so hard to get treatment to veterans. As one well-known expert on PTSD explains in the story:

“It’s wicked difficult to treat anyone with moral injuries from combat in the traditional medical model,” says psychiatrist Jonathan Shay, MD, an expert on PTSD known for his books on the difficulties soldiers face returning home from war. “It destroys the capacity for trust. What it leaves is despair, an expectation of harm, humiliation or exploitation, and that is a horrible state of being. The traditional medical model – in an office with the door closed – is the last thing they want. I’m convinced that’s where peers come in. Peers are indispensable.”

Early told me many of his horror stories from war – stories that he rarely talks about. The time he was called to another execution area where there were enough body parts for 12 people who had all been gagged, bound, shot and burned. But, he said, they could only put together eight people. “We were trying to find a way to identify them,” he said. “Whenever I grabbed a hand, it would just crumble to dust.”

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