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The scenario many of us learned in school is that two X chromosomes make someone female, and an X and a Y chromosome make someone male. These are simplistic ways of thinking about what is scientifically very complex.

The scenario many of us learned in school is that two X chromosomes make someone female, and an X and a Y chromosome make someone male. These are simplistic ways of thinking about what is scientifically very complex.

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Are the health-benefit claims from intermittent fasting backed up by scientific evidence? John Trepanowski, postdoctoral research fellow at the Stanford Prevention Research Center,weighs in.

Are the health-benefit claims from intermittent fasting backed up by scientific evidence? John Trepanowski, postdoctoral research fellow at the Stanford Prevention Research Center,weighs in.

Approximately 10 percent of potential blood donors are turned away because of low iron. Here, a Stanford Blood Center writer offers tips for boosting a person's count.

Approximately 10 percent of potential blood donors are turned away because of low iron. Here, a Stanford Blood Center writer offers tips for boosting a person's count.

Immature fat cells grow up if stress hormones rise at night. A new study explains the molecular underpinnings of why people gain weight due to chronic stress, disrupted circadian rhythms and treatment with glucocorticoid drugs.

Immature fat cells grow up if stress hormones rise at night. A new study explains the molecular underpinnings of why people gain weight due to chronic stress, disrupted circadian rhythms and treatment with glucocorticoid drugs.

In this piece in a series on high blood pressure, Randall Stafford, MD, PhD, tackles the problems caused by the side effects of medications.

In this piece in a series on high blood pressure, Randall Stafford, MD, PhD, tackles the problems caused by the side effects of medications.

In an effort to help those interested in going into medicine, fourth-year Stanford med students Rachel Rizal and Rishi Mediratta have written a book: Cracking Med School Admissions.

In an effort to help those interested in going into medicine, fourth-year Stanford med students Rachel Rizal and Rishi Mediratta have written a book: Cracking Med School Admissions.

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Can computers carry out hospital safety-monitoring tasks better than humans? A Stanford research team has been testing the idea; so far, it's working well.

Can computers carry out hospital safety-monitoring tasks better than humans? A Stanford research team has been testing the idea; so far, it's working well.

In a new book, Paul Ehrlich lays out the claim that modern life has been harmful to smaller jaws, which he says leads to problems ranging from heart disease to sleep apnea.

In a new book, Paul Ehrlich lays out the claim that modern life has been harmful to smaller jaws, which he says leads to problems ranging from heart disease to sleep apnea.

In an interview in the journal Neuron, Stanford's Rob Malenka holds forth on a wide range of subjects stretching from reflections on his own career trajectory to his approach to boosting those of his trainees to the future of neuroscience itself.

In an interview in the journal Neuron, Stanford's Rob Malenka holds forth on a wide range of subjects stretching from reflections on his own career trajectory to his approach to boosting those of his trainees to the future of neuroscience itself.

According to Stanford pediatric oncologist Crystal Mackall, a pediatric oncologist with Stanford Children's Health, immunotherapy with CAR T cells is more precise, more specific and just as potent a treatment for leukemia as chemotherapy.

According to Stanford pediatric oncologist Crystal Mackall, a pediatric oncologist with Stanford Children's Health, immunotherapy with CAR T cells is more precise, more specific and just as potent a treatment for leukemia as chemotherapy.

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