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Proteins that guide transcription factors from the nuclear membrane to the DNA cause drug-resistant skin cancers and are new targets for drug development.

Proteins that guide transcription factors from the nuclear membrane to the DNA cause drug-resistant skin cancers and are new targets for drug development.

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In a drive to reduce high cervical-cancer rates in Nigeria, a nonprofit organization co-founded by Stanford oncology researcher Ami Bhatt, MD, PhD, has enlisted the imaginative assistance of an educational comic book.

In a drive to reduce high cervical-cancer rates in Nigeria, a nonprofit organization co-founded by Stanford oncology researcher Ami Bhatt, MD, PhD, has enlisted the imaginative assistance of an educational comic book.

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A novel immunotherapy appears safe for use in patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Here, a Northern California man shares his experience in the study.

A novel immunotherapy appears safe for use in patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Here, a Northern California man shares his experience in the study.

A Stanford-designed computer algorithm helps doctors predict the lifespan of patients with metastatic cancer by looking for clues in their own exam notes.

A Stanford-designed computer algorithm helps doctors predict the lifespan of patients with metastatic cancer by looking for clues in their own exam notes.

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In a new study, a team of researchers has examined the relationship between protein binding to DNA and the development of cancer.

In a new study, a team of researchers has examined the relationship between protein binding to DNA and the development of cancer.

Cancerous tumors cause disease in two ways: they grow and spread. But a new immune therapy approach may be able to target both problems simultaneously.

Cancerous tumors cause disease in two ways: they grow and spread. But a new immune therapy approach may be able to target both problems simultaneously.

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Hiding mRNA messages in CARTs — positively charged degradable vehicles —smuggles them across the cell membrane and can 'vaccinate' against cancer in mice.

Hiding mRNA messages in CARTs — positively charged degradable vehicles —smuggles them across the cell membrane and can 'vaccinate' against cancer in mice.

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