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TV watching linked to aggression in tots

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A study of more than 3,000 3-year-olds found that those who watched television or were exposed to TV while others were watching, were at "increased risk for exhibiting aggressive behavior." Authors of a paper appearing in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine believe there are many reasons for the link between TV and aggression. As explained by WebMD:

Possible reasons are that children who see violence on television become desensitized to it; parents who don’t have limits on television may be less likely to have other rules, such as regular bedtimes; and when children are watching television, they are not participating in other activities that may benefit their social development, such as playing.

Numerous other studies in recent years have shown the potentially harmful effects of TV on children. Thomas Robinson, MD, a pediatrician with Stanford and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, has done extensive research in this area; in 2005, he published a paper showing that children with TVs in their bedrooms perform significantly more poorly on standardized tests than their peers without.

Photo by (A3R) angelrravelor (A3R)

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