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Baby woolly mammoth scanned for Chicago museum

Apparently mummies aren't the only ancient creatures being scanned these days. Now GE Healthcare has donated time on its MR and CT scanners to The Field Museum to image a 42,000 year-old baby woolly mammoth. From the GE release:

In collaboration with the International Mammoth Committee (IMC) and The Field Museum, Lyuba was brought to the GE Healthcare Institute in Waukesha, WI to be imaged on three different systems. First, she was scanned on the Discovery CT750 HD, a 64-slice, high definition CT scanner. The images obtained from this scan allow scientists to learn more about her internal mineral deposits as well as her bone structure. Second, in an effort to see her entire skeletal structure from head to tail, she was imaged on the InnovaÆ 4100IQ, a three-dimensional digital X-ray system. Finally, Lyuba was scanned on a high performance open MRI system, the Signa OpenSpeed EXCITE 0.7T, to view her soft tissue including the brain, liver and heart.

The embedded video talks more about the project.

Via Medgadget

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