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EPA to study environmental and health effects of BPA

More bad news for Bisphenol-A (BPA): yesterday the Environmental Protection Agency labeled BPA as a "chemical of concern" and announced a number of actions to assess the potential health and environmental effects of the chemical.

BPA, an estrogen-like compound found in many baby bottles and other plastics, has been linked to heart disease and other health conditions.

The EPA plans to partner with the Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to research the health consequences of BPA exposure. According to a release the action plan includes:

  • Requiring information on concentrations of BPA in surface water, ground water, and drinking water to determine if BPA may be present at levels of potential concern.
  • Requiring manufacturers to provide test data to assist the agency in evaluating its possible impacts, including long-term effects on growth, reproduction, and development in aquatic organisms and wildlife.
  • Using EPA’s Design for the Environment (DfE) program to look for ways to reduce unnecessary exposures, including assessing substitutes, while additional studies continue
  • Continuing to evaluate the potential disproportionate impact on children and other sub-populations through exposure from non-food packaging uses.

Previously: FDA expresses concern over BPA - but doesn't ban it and BPA = Aggressive tots?
Via Scientific American

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