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Stress, will-power top reasons why Americans fail to adopt healthy habits

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If you're struggling to keep your New Year's resolution to exercise more, eat healthier, quit smoking or lose weight, you're not alone.

An online poll of 2,000 U.S. adults conducted in March by the American Psychological Association found of that just over half of respondents promised to make such lifestyle changes this year, but fewer than one in five reported progress in achieving their goals.

In assessing barriers preventing people from sticking to their resolutions the poll found:

More than three-quarters of those who made health-related resolutions say significant obstacles block them from making progress such as willpower (33 percent), making changes alone (24 percent), and experiencing too much stress (20 percent).

In an earlier post, Mark Abramson, DDS, who runs stress-reduction courses at Stanford, offered the following advice on what to do if your resolutions hit a roadblock:

With any resolution you make, you're going to drop the commitment over and over and over again. If your deeper commitment is to take care of yourself, you can get back to the resolution and actually make slipping up part of the process.

Now's the time to lace up those sneakers - even if it's mentally - and get back on track. You can get started with these tips from Stanford experts on how to slim down, de-stress and stick to an exercise routine.

Via The Checkup
Photo by vespar avenue

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