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Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Aug. 23

The five most-read posts on Scope this week were:

Ancient crocodile mummies scanned at Stanford: A pair of Greco-Roman crocodile mummies belonging to the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum at UC Berkeley were scanned at Stanford in March. Preliminary CT images of one of the crocodiles are also available here.

Stanford stem cell expert weighs in on district court ruling: Irving Weissman, MD, director of the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, issued a sharp condemnation of Monday's U.S. District Court ruling temporarily blocking researchers from using federal funds to conduct human embryonic stem cell research.

Research shows eating berries may boost brain health: New research, presented this week at the National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, showed eating blueberries, strawberries and acai berries might be able to slow the brain's natural aging process.

More concern over US judge's stem cell ruling: Stanford law professor Hank Greely, JD, and School of Medicine researchers responded to the U.S. District Court ruling temporarily blocking researchers from using federal funds to conduct human embryonic stem cell research.

A father's reaction to the embryonic stem cell injunction: In a video statement, Andres Trevino, whose son benefited from a therapy involving embryonic stem cell research, expressed his profound disappointment about the U.S. District Court ruling on human embryonic stem cell research.

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Category:
Biomedical research
Stanford immunologist pushes field to shift its research focus from mice to humans

Much of what we know about the immune system comes from experiments conducted on mice.  But lab mice are not little human beings. The two species are separated by both physiology and  lifestyles. Stanford immunologist Mark Davis is calling on his colleagues to shift their research focus to people.