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Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Oct. 25

The five most-read posts on Scope this week were:

Spain holds napping championship to revive siesta tradition: Spain held its first siesta championship in Madrid, and the country's top napper was awarded a prize of 1,000 euros. Organized by the National Association of Friends of the Siesta, the competition aims to bring awareness to how modern life has eroded the Spanish tradition of taking a snooze after lunch.

Really, IRS? Agency doesn't recognize breastfeeding as form of preventive medicine: The Internal Revenue Service, determining which products qualify for tax-sheltered health care spending accounts, ruled that breastfeeding supplies don't qualify.

Image of the week: Bedbug: A digitally-colored scanning electron micrograph of Cimex lectularius showing the insect's six jointed legs and "skin-piercing mouthparts."

The largest stem cell research building in the U.S.: In a 1:2:1 podcast, Irving Weissman, MD, discusses the Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research Building. The new 200,000-square-foot facility may be the largest research building of its kind in the world.

Extra fructose, hidden in plain sight: A University of Southern California study found that Coke, Pepsi, Sprite and several other popular soft drinks have more fructose than their labels stated.

Popular posts

Category:
Biomedical research
Stanford immunologist pushes field to shift its research focus from mice to humans

Much of what we know about the immune system comes from experiments conducted on mice.  But lab mice are not little human beings. The two species are separated by both physiology and  lifestyles. Stanford immunologist Mark Davis is calling on his colleagues to shift their research focus to people.