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Stanford neurologist rocks out for science

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It’s not every day that a Stanford physician gets to spend several hours on set with a rock star. But take a look at this photo and you'll see it’s Stanford’s Frank Longo, MD, PhD, (in white) standing next to Bret Michaels, the musician/singer and reality-television star.
No, the professor and chair of the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences isn’t giving up his day job to join the former lead singer of Poison on tour. He and 16 other “Rock Stars of Science” are featured alongside well-known musicians in a special public service campaign in GQ's December “Men of the Year” edition, available nationally Nov. 23.

GQ partnered with Geoffrey Beene Gives BackÆ and Entertainment Industry Foundation/Stand Up To Cancer on the campaign, which aims to support research funding and get young people interested in a career in science.

Longo told me one of the best parts about participating in this effort (besides trying on some amazing outfits) was knowing it would help spread the word about the neurological research being done here. “The cures are out there, but getting there requires hard work, visibility and funding,” he said.

Longo, who plays keyboard with other Stanford neurologists in his free time, also said he thinks being a rock star is harder than being a doctor:

Rock stars have to not only thrive at their musical craft but have to create a dazzling image and presence. As a doctor, my goal is to do a good job, plus I get to see my wife and kids on most nights.

And just so there’s no confusion, Michaels is the one with the long hair and tattoos.

Photo by Kurt Iswarienko

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