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What goes on in your brain when you experience love?

Love_Sculpture_2.jpg

Feelings of love are often described as "butterflies in your stomach" or a "fluttering in the heart." But love is more likely attributed to a dozen areas in your brain, according to an MRI comparison study by Syracuse University researchers.

Scientific American recently published images from that study and a story explaining the findings:

Researchers have revealed the fonts of desire by comparing functional MRI studies of people who indicated they were experiencing passionate love, maternal love or unconditional love. Together, the regions release neurotransmitters and other chemicals in the brain and blood that prompt greater euphoric sensations such as attraction and pleasure ... Passion also heightens several cognitive functions, as the brain regions and chemicals surge.

Previously: Ke$ha's right: Study suggests love and drug addiction activate same regions of brain, Professor Sean Mackey discusses the painkilling power of love, Stanford research provides insight on pain, love
Photo by Katie Tegtmeyer

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