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More on Stanford neurologists' work to fight lethal pediatric brain tumor

Yesterday my colleague wrote about a major advancement in the fight against an almost universally fatal type of childhood brain cancer, diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. The San Francisco Chronicle covered the story today, and reporter Erin Allday explains in her piece the significance of the development:

Stanford's mouse model will prove "exceedingly helpful" in studying the cancer and testing possible drug treatments, said Dr. Daphne Haas-Kogan, program director of radiation oncology at UCSF's Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.

"It's a very big deal," said Haas-Kogan, who serves on a committee focused on brain stem tumors. "Every six months I give a talk about potential treatments and clinical trials, and it's always a really depressing 45-minute talk. But this year was the first time I got up with enthusiasm."

Previously: Big advance against a vicious pediatric brain tumor

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