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Meet Stanford Hospital's new CEO, Amir Dan Rubin

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Amir Dan Rubin is steeped in academic medicine. Before arriving at Stanford in January to take the helm at Stanford Hospital & Clinics (SHC), he was the chief operating officer at the UCLA Health System. And, before UCLA, he held a similar post at another academic facility, Stony Brook University Hospital in New York. Clearly, he knows the unique advantages that the marriage between academics and medicine offers the patient.

Rubin has arrived at Stanford at one of the most exciting times in the hospital's 100-year history. The hospital's plan to build a state-of-the-art in-patient facility next to the existing facility is in the final stages of the required approval process with the City of Palo Alto. Already a Corporate Partners Program has emerged to provide unprecendented philanthropic support. Some of Silicon Valley's most stellar buinesses - Apple, eBay, HP, Intel, Intuit and Oracle - are founding members and are projected to provide as much as $150 million over the next 10 years to help build the new hospital. SHC expects to raise $400 million or more in private donations to fund construction of the new facility.

In my newest 1:2:1 podcast, Rubin discusses his first few months on the job and how today's hospital CEOs navigate the challenges of the current health-care environment. He also lays out his vision for the Stanford Medicine experience, which involves thinking big while healing humanity one patient at a time.

Previously: Amir Dan Rubin named president and CEO of Stanford Hospital & Clinics and Silicon Valley companies partner with Stanford to build new hospital

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