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Stanford Women's Cancer Center opens Monday

A new state-of-the-art facility specializing in breast and gynecologic cancers will open its doors at Stanford on June 27.

The 13,800-square-foot center will be housed across the street from the Stanford Cancer Institute and will provide centralized location for diagnosis, treatment, clinical trials and research of breast and gynecologic cancers. At the center, a multidisciplinary team will provide a combination of psychological, social and clinical services to patients as well as foster collaboration among scientists. According to a release:

Research at the Stanford Women’s Cancer Center will include investigation of new diagnostic tools like microbubbles and sound waves; treatment plans based on a woman’s genetic profile, including therapeutic vaccines; and clues to more sophisticated prevention through genetic counseling. Other work will look at new minimally invasive surgical techniques assisted by robotics and lasers, radiation delivered directly to tumors during surgery or by internal capsule, fertility preservation technology and non-pharmaceutical aids to support long-term survivorship such as acupuncture, meditation, exercise and nutrition. Patients will have greater access to clinical trials of those new diagnostic and treatment methods.

Jonathan Berek, MD, MMS, an internationally-recognized expert in research and treatment of gynecologic cancers, will direct the new center. Berek said he believes locating breast cancer and gynecologic cancer care in one physical site could accelerate the progress of the knowledge growth and its translation into diagnosis and care advances.

There can be considerable overlap in research... If you look at what happened when scientists shared their work in the early gene mapping projects, you can see that research translates much faster into treatments when you break down the typical silos of individual research.

Previously: Garth Brooks and Trisha Yearwood help fundraising effort for Women’s Cancer Center at Stanford

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