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Stanford GSB program debuts global health innovation blog

Stanford GSB program debuts global health innovation blog

To promote research and foster conversation on developing sustainable health-care solutions for low-resource environments, the Stanford Graduate School of Business recently launched a global health innovation blog of the same name.

In explaining the motivation for launching the blog and focus of the content, the organizers write:

We created the Global Health Innovation blog to give healthcare innovators, entrepreneurs, and other professionals a place to read and share information about the many challenges of developing and commercializing products and services targeted at underserved populations in developing countries. We also intend to highlight creative solutions being used to overcome common barriers in an effort to inspire and assist the growing community of global health innovators at Stanford and beyond.

Every few weeks, we’ll post a new vignette that tells the story of company or team, a challenge they faced, and the solution(s) they used to address the problem. In some cases, these stories may also focus on lessons learned from unsuccessful experiences. We hope that others who have either faced similar issues or have tried alternative solutions will share their insights by adding a Comment to the post.

The latest post examines the story of SafePoint Trust founder Marc Koska’s efforts to address the threat of unsafe injections, his involvement in developing a low-cost auto disposable syringe and the organization’s ongoing campaign to improve basic health-care in developing countries.

Previously: How a Stanford dermatologist is using telemedicine to reach underserved populations in California, U.S. Chief Technology Officer discusses health-care reform’s effects on innovation and Ask Stanford Med: Answers to your questions on health-care innovation

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