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Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Jan. 6

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

For a truly happy New Year, cultivate sustainable happiness: A Q&A with clinical psychologist Laura Delizonna, PhD, who is currently teaching a four-course series on sustainable happiness for the Stanford Continuing Studies program, discussing science-based methods to enhance happiness.

Flu Near You campaign aims to improve monitoring of flu outbreaks, vaccinations: The Skoll Global Threats Fund in partnership with HealthMap and the American Public Health Association  launched Flu Near You last November. The initiative asks participants to complete brief weekly surveys and, in return, it provides users with various resources, including maps of regional or state level flu activity and customized e-mail disease alerts for their location.

Ask Stanford Med: Stanford health psychologist Kelly McGonigal taking questions on willpower: This week, Stanford health psychologist Kelly McGonigal, PhD, took questions on how to boost willpower and achieve your New Year's resolutions as part of our Ask Stanford Med series. McGonigal will respond to a selection of the questions submitted in a future entry on Scope.

Rep. Anna Eshoo celebrates new cancer research law at Stanford: In a press conference held at Stanford Hospital & Clinics on Wednesday, Rep. Anna G. Eshoo (D-Palo Alto) announced the passage of a new law aimed at developing better treatments and potential cures for the deadliest of cancers.

Spreading awareness of inflammatory bowel disease, one bathroom stall at a time: An article published this week in the New York Times spotlights an advertising campaign from the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America designed to increase awareness about inflammatory bowel disease. The Escape the Stall ads, like the one pictured in the entry, address a difficult-to-discuss topic with grace.

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