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A look at mental health biomarkers

On NPR today: A segment exploring efforts to develop tests that detect problems in the brain. Included in the piece is the story of Menlo Park man Robin Jones, who experienced sudden memory difficulties in his late-60s and came to see neurologist Michael Greicius, MD, at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders. There, Jones went through the standard cognitive evaluation for Alzheimer's and also took a biomarker test for the disease.

"Sad, yes, there was sadness," Anne Jones said about learning her husband had tested positive for Alzheimer's-linked proteins. "But there is a certain amount of relief. There's relief knowing why your arm hurts or why you have a bad cough. Knowing how to sort of chart out the rest of our time together."

Previously: Researchers combine brain-imaging tool and stroke test to detect early signs of dementia, How new imaging technologies may help advance early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s and Common genetic Alzheimer’s risk factor disrupts healthy older women’s brain function, but not men’s

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