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A look at the "Serious Scientist Myth"

In an essay today on SciLogs, author Matt Shipman continues a thread bucking what he calls the "Serious Scientist Myth" - the idea that "serious" scientists dislike speaking to news reporters about their work and hold their interview-willing colleagues in low regard.

Shipman, a science writer and public information officer at North Carolina State University, translates peer-reviewed studies on this topic into reader-friendly form - as he suggests that many senior, or simply confident, researchers can do when speaking to the press. And he has fun with another stereotype, this one about journalists:

So, here’s what I want to know: Where did the Serious Scientist Myth come from?

This isn’t a cute narrative trick, where I ask a question at the top of the story and then answer the question for my readers. I have no idea what the answer is. Instead, I’ll explain why I’m asking the question.

Read more here.

Previously: Bryan Vartabedian: Physicians are public affairs professionals, The influence of medical press releases on news coverage quality and The problem with “science by press conference”

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