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Enjoying the turkey while watching your waistline

As part of Thanksgiving tradition, millions of Americans will soon be jumping in cars or airplanes, heading to loved ones' homes, and eating. In some cases, eating a lot. If you're one of the many who wants to enjoy the holiday without over-doing it, you might find a few past Scope entries helpful. Posts here and here offer tips for reducing the urge to overeat and to enjoy holiday staples without compromising your health. And for those of you who may be tempted to indulge over the next six weeks or so and get back in shape come the New Year, Stanford nutritionist Jo Ann Hattner, RD, has this to say:

This is a poor health strategy primarily because your body has already had to accommodate the excesses of the holiday eating and that may have had detrimental effects, particularly to your cardiovascular system. In addition, depending on how much you gained during the holidays it can be an overwhelming task to lose the weight. If this is the case, unfortunately, you may still have it on board when the next holiday rolls around.

Previously: Stanford nutrition expert discusses how to eat well while staying jolly, Battling the bulge this holiday season, Stanford nutritionist offers tips for eating healthy during the holidays and Experts provide tips on healthier holiday eating for kids

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